Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

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FEATURED SESSION: The Human Age: Confronting the Innovation Conundrum

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 09:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S100 Ballroom

Dennis Dimick, Executive Editor of National Geographic magazine, presents his stunning photographs of the environment guaranteed to make you consider your place and purpose in the world. Beautifully considered, Mr. Dimick’s photos explore the impact of human ingenuity and the Earth’s ability to sustain it.
Emerging Leaders Network

When: Saturday, 07/14/2018 through Saturday, 07/14/2018, 08:00 AM - 06:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S102ABC

Invitation only. The IFT Emerging Leaders Network (ELN) is a highly selective global leadership program established for new professionals in the science of food who are eager to expand their leadership skills. The program is designed to bridge the gap between the participant’s academic experience and their on–the–job training.
IFT18 Career Center Live

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 08:30 AM - 05:30 PM

Where: McCormick Place - South Hall

IFT18 Career Center Live combines informal networking opportunities for potential job seekers and hiring companies, as well as formal pre-scheduled interview opportunities for companies with immediate hiring needs.

Get noticed by some of the top companies and job seekers in food science and technology from around the globe by participating in IFT18 Career Center Live.
IFT Prayer Breakfast

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 07:00 AM - 08:15 AM

Where: Park Grill (11 N. Michigan Avenue) - Founders Room

Annual Prayer Breakfast for all IFT attendees. Registration and Ticket required to enter the event. We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance. Ticket price is $35/person.
Click here to register for this event!
Benchmarks, Hurdles, and Metrics to Compare Products and Categories: Is There a Right Way to Set a Standard for Success?

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S401ABC

Benchmarking is a tactic to assess how a given product matches up to competitors or standards in the marketplace. It can be used to establish sensory or business practice for the desired user experience. Benchmarking may be used to define fundamental, baseline metrics for a product, which allows for a form of performance tracking over product iterations. The benchmarking approach can be derived from a comprehensive series of quantitative studies all the way through to simple category review done in a small qualitative setting. Depending on the needs and risks, benchmarking can give the business informative design decisions to drive product design and user experience.

The goal of this curated symposium, the third in a series, is to present IFT members with a dialog between industry professionals on truths and myths behind practices that are thought to be commonly agreed upon approaches. In the case of benchmarking, knowing what the category benchmarks are for a given product may help the cross-functional team understand their strategy for product design, development and communication. There is a different point of view that the use of benchmarks that are general can hobble the same product design effort. Different disciplines in product design have varied perceptions regarding the value and approach to benchmarking. The Sensory and Consumer Sciences Division (SCSD) has selected a number of practicing professionals to discuss this area and provide understanding to both the division membership and the greater food and beverage product design and development community on the status of this area of interest.



*Our thanks to Compusense for their sponsorship of the Sensory Science track*
Whole Genome Sequencing: Overview and Role in Food Safety Systems

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S404D

In recent years, whole genome sequencing has emerged as a powerful food safety tool. The unprecedented resolution of whole genome sequencing allows for highly improved characterization and subtyping of microorganisms over methods such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis. This in turn has helped to improve epidemiological investigations of foodborne illnesses by more quickly and accurately linking clinical isolate whole genome sequence subtypes with those of food and environmental isolates. By providing this faster and more accurate link, foodborne illness outbreaks can be resolved in much more timely manner, which therefore helps reduce the number of foodborne illness cases. Consequently, whole genome sequencing has been adopted as a key tool in the repertoire of regulatory and public health agencies such as the FDA, USDA, and CDC for resolution of foodborne illness outbreak investigations and other applications such as monitoring of antimicrobial resistance.

Yet, although these agencies have begun to use whole genome sequencing in these ways, there is still a need for policy development surrounding the technology. As a result, the use of whole genome sequencing in the food industry has been limited. There are many different applications of the technology that would greatly improve food safety management from different areas of the food industry. For instance, whole genome sequencing can be used to identify possible harborage of a bacterium in a food processing facility. It can also be used to tie together isolates that were involved in a beef slaughter "event day." Other uses of next generation sequencing technology that are not directly applied to whole genome sequencing, such as 16S metagenomics, are also important for investigating sources of spoilage and determining the types of microorganisms present at different stages of the process. Yet, due to uncertainty around the regulatory perspective of the use of the technology, the food industry has been reluctant to widely adopt it as a tool in their food safety management systems.

This symposium will discuss an overview of the current technology that is available for performing whole genome sequencing and the current uses of whole genome sequencing by third party laboratories. This will then be followed up by presentations from the meat and produce industries where the use of whole genome sequencing by the members of these industries will be discussed, along with the concerns that still remain for these industries from a regulatory standpoint. Lastly, the session will be rounded out by a presentation on the legal and regulatory concerns on the use of whole genome sequencing, including information on the current landscape of policy development with regard to the technology.
Flavors of Food Protein Ingredients and Their Applications in Product Formulation

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

Plant proteins are important protein sources to meet the nutrition demands of the increasing population. Flavor is an important aspect of food ingredients, including protein ingredients, that dictates consumer acceptability of the final food products. Even though great progress has been made in the off-flavor control of soy protein, off-flavor of many plant protein ingredients remains a major limiting factor for their use in food products. Protein ingredients from different sources that carry unique flavor profiles, which can be influenced by the processing and storage conditions. In addition to their intrinsic flavors, protein ingredients interact with flavor compounds and influence the overall flavor profile of the final products when used in formulation or flavor encapsulation. This symposium aims to cover the intrinsic flavors of protein ingredients as well as their interaction with other food components that affect product flavor profiles. The odor and taste of protein ingredients and the effects of processing on protein flavor profile will be addressed in the first two presentations. The first presentation will be an overview of the off-flavor in pulses, which will also provide background knowledge for audiences who are not familiar with protein flavor or flavor chemistry. The second presentation will report the findings from ongoing research on rice protein flavor. Protein-flavor interaction and its influence on food formulation will be discussed in the third presentation. The fourth presentation will report on sensory evaluation studies of plant protein-based food products that are currently on the market. It will provide an understanding of how different attributes of protein ingredient influence consumer liking and how the information can be used in formulation to meet consumer needs. The topics will be of interest to audiences both from the food industry and academia who are working with protein ingredients or sensory evaluation.
Advances and Implementation in Ultraviolet Light Technology in Beverage, Dairy, and Grain Applications

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

Ultraviolet (UV) light has been used for decades for disinfecting water, and is broadly applied in Europe and North America. But until recently it has not been adopted for opaque fluids such as liquid foods and beverages. Recently, successful application in juice treatment has demonstrated the feasibility of UV for treating these fluids, and UV technology has started to emerge as a promising non-thermal preservation processes for other beverages. As a non-thermal, non-chemical disinfection technology, UV is anticipated to have minimal effects on product quality, flavor, and nutritive content. UV treatment is effective against food and water borne pathogens, spoilage microflora, spores, and can control pathogen levels to comply with regulatory requirements. The challenge remains that the range of optical and other properties of beverages is extremely broad. Also, each disinfection process may have different microbiological targets, meaning that each UV process has to be developed individually using specific system designs. In each application, three factors must be assessed: the treatment level required for the necessary reduction in target pathogen levels; the impact on product quality; and the regulatory requirements.

UV treatment may also be applied to destroy pathogens and chemical contaminants on solid surfaces, and UV is often used in laboratories to inactivate pathogens in fume hoods. Recently UV has been considered for treating surface toxins on grains, but in this application there are significant challenges in ensuring uniform treatment of an opaque, irregular object. In spite of this, recent research has shown promising results in this application, achieving significant reductions in mycotoxins on the surface of grain. Ultraviolet (UVC) light at 253.7 nm has shown promise as a non-ionizing postharvest strategy for the reduction of fungal and mycotoxin loads on both artificial and grain surfaces. Since the challenges of implementing UV are both theoretical and practical, this symposium has been designed as a collaboration between academic, government research, and UV industry experts. This symposium will briefly introduce the fundamental principles of UVC light germicidal effects and present approaches for evaluation of product and process parameters in applications of this technology for liquid foods and solid surfaces.

The first focused presentation will address the commercialization of UVC light application for non-thermal pasteurization of water in the dairy industry and requirements for regulatory compliance with the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance that governs the production of Class A dairy products. The second presentation will discuss UVC disinfection for beverages with low UV transmittance, focusing on juices. The effect of fluid optical properties on achieving required log reduction of food-borne pathogens will be discussed, and inactivation of relevant pathogens will be demonstrated. The third presentation will discuss the application of UV treatment for grain, in order to destroy mycotoxins on the food surface. The presenter will discuss results of a feasibility study of UVC light application to reduce fungal growth and mycotoxin loads on the surface of stored corn and wheat, and detail the challenges of UV treatment of UV treatment of irregular shapes.
IFTSA Student Lounge

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 08:00 AM - 06:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S503

Meet up with students and other colleagues at the IFT18 student lounge. Be sure to stop by and pick up your student events brochure and OFG swag!
Minnesota Cocktail Hour

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 05:00 PM - 07:00 PM

Where: Hilton Chicago - Boulevard A (2nd Floor)

University of Minnesota and Minnesota Section of IFT will jointly invite IFT members to attend the cocktail hour and interact with University of Minnesota faculty, student, alumni and Minnesota IFT section members. Registration and Ticket required to enter the event. We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance. $25/person.
Click here to register for this event!