Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

251 - 260 Results out of 513
The ABC of Gen Z: Who Are They and Why Are They Important to the Food Industry?

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

By the end of 2019 Gen Z will surpass Millennials as the most populous generation, comprising 7.7 billion people, or 32% of the global population. This year those born in 2001 will be turning 18. They will be entering college and in 2020 they will account for $29-$143 billion in direct spending and will influence a much larger amount. They have been growing up in a period of unrest and uncertainty with ubiquitous digital connections in a world that is increasingly urban and diverse. How do all of these factors impact who they are and how they make decisions? How do they behave in retail and food service? What kinds of ingredients and foods are they looking for? Join us to learn more while we explore these topics.
Tribology in Food: Past, Current, and Future

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392

Tribology, the study of friction, lubrication, and wear, has garnered significant interest in the last several decades, with a marked increase in publications on this topic in the last few years. This increase is mainly due to the current opinion that food tribological behaviors can help explain textural attributes related to friction, such as grittiness, smoothness, and astringency, that cannot be explained by rheological behaviors. While no universal relationships between food friction behaviors and food textural attributes have been found to date, tribological measurements generally provide complimentary information to standard rheological measurements.
 
This session will open with a discussion of basic tribological information needed to understand the current state of the food tribology field. Next, we will cover best practices in tribological measurements. Because tribology is a system property, not a material property, great care must be taken in selecting measurement surfaces, environmental conditions, and measurement protocols. This discussion will also cover common issues in tribological testing and how to overcome them. Afterward, we will present current findings on relationships between food tribological behaviors and sensory attributes, as this topic has provoked great interest in the current literature. Next, we will discuss food wear, which is currently a highly underexplored topic in the literature. Wear behaviors may relate to food oral and industrial processing behaviors, potentially serving as a predictor for food breakdown and processing ability. Finally, we will close the session with a panel discussion of future applications of tribology.
United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 2: Achieving Zero Hunger by Reducing Food Waste, Improving Food Security, and Developing Innovations in Food Science

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-386

Already over two billion people worldwide are affected by some form of food insecurity such as malnutrition or poverty. Furthermore, the world population is projected to grow to 9 billion by 2050, while urbanization is set to increase by 78%. The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018” (FAO) states that the number of hungry people is on the rise already today. While a great deal of attention is paid to improve the quality, production and delivery of food, an oft neglected aspect is preventing food loss as it makes its way from the producer to the consumer. Nearly one third of all food produced for human consumption is lost before it makes its way to the consumer. Global food supply chain losses are substantial, and amidst talk of having to increase food production significantly to meet growing demands, there appears to be a gap to identify how much food is lost and wasted and how we can prevent these food losses. Reducing this loss will not only have a direct impact on hunger by increasing the available supply of food, it will have several indirect economic and environmental benefits that can be observed throughout the food value chain. 

Another aspect of achieving zero hunger, is solving “hidden hunger” or malnutrition. It is often the case that even when adequate food reaches a population, the proper nutrition is lacking. Finding the means to deliver proper and often specialized nutrients to large target populations is a vital technology in the fight against global hunger. This requires transformational thinking and innovation some examples of which will be introduced in this session.

Lastly, this session also aims at providing clarity on how interested food technologists could participate either remotely or locally in the various programs managed by UN food agencies. This is a first collective step between these organizations and IFT to find avenues to identify food technology capabilities and resources that can contribute to the strengthening of capacities of local communities that these organizations assist.

There do not exist clear venues for food technology professionals to contribute their expertise and collaborate with multilateral organizations in projects either remotely or locally. For example, WFP feeds 80 million people annually with only a staff of 20 food technologists contributing to the development, distribution and management of the safety and quality of food value chains in some of the planet’s most remote and insecure regions. We hope to bring awareness of the demand for food technologists in these vital sectors so we would have the talent necessary to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger. 
Chasing the Perfect Bite: Advancements in the Alternative Meat Landscape and Technology

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277

The plant-based meat alternative market continues to expand quickly, with a projected growth of 6.8% between 2018 and 2023. This growth will transform the plant-based meat market from an estimated $4.63 billion (USD) in 2018 to $6.3 billion by 2023, thanks to an increase in consumers who seek healthy, high-protein, and sustainable options to traditional meat products. Flexitarians, those who consume a primarily vegetarian diet but occasionally seek meat or fish, also contribute substantially to meat alternative consumption as their principal protein source. In the past, traditional plant-based foods often had the appearance and texture of mixed vegetable patties; however, consumer demand has shifted. Today, trending products are the plant-based versions of animal-based meats which are similar in look, feel, and taste. Joanna Clifton of Innova Market Insights will open this session with an introduction to the alternative meat industry including growth, trends observed, and challenges encountered. Our next speaker, Dariush Ajami, Chief Innovation Officer of Beyond Meat, will share the production hurdles faced during manufacturing as well as the complexities of delivering organoleptically satisfying finished products. Jenni Harrington of Buhler Group will discuss advancements in extrusion technology and equipment, highlighted with tips on effective use of extrusion to create a desired finished product. Finally, the session will close with an overview of key plant-based proteins and functional ingredients by Ryan Kowalski from Ingredion, showcasing how to deliver a pleasant eating experience from both a taste and texture perspective. Session attendees will gain an introduction to the growing alternative meat segment with an understanding of finished product challenges and consumer acceptance. In addition, familiarity with equipment and key functional ingredients used during extrusion of plant-based meat alternatives will be provided.
Validation of Nonthermal Processing Methods Used for Controlling Pathogens in Foods to Ensure Compliance With Regulatory Requirements

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268

Nonthermal processing methods have become popular due to the notable advantages over traditional food pasteurization methods. HPP validation is complex and poses a serious food safety risk if the correct processing parameters are not met. Validation protocols, as well an indicator to ensure foods receive the correct time-at-pressure cycle, will be discussed.

Best practices and challenges related to the validation and adoption of nonthermal technologies for microbial inactivation and regulatory compliance will be presented.
Fat Is Back: Emerging Science Around Health, Nutrition, and Application

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

The science around fats is turning around to reshape the current knowledge as lots of new research findings are emerging in this area. Milk fats do not comprise only saturated fats but also other important components, such as phospholipids, branch chain fatty acids, short and medium chain fatty acids, etc., which play critical role in human health and nutrition. Recent findings suggest that (i) obesity risk may not be related to consumption of higher fat dairy foods, (ii) branch chain fatty acid type components may be promising in perinatal nutrition, (iii) consumption of saturated fats might not be linked with risk of CVD, and (iv) there is a link between dairy fat biomarkers and reduced risk of diabetes. Overall, a shift in thinking on the connection between dairy foods and heart health, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes as well as other diseases is shifting. These findings have a profound effect on consumer behavior as the consumption of full fat food products is going up. This session will cover the latest research, health benefits, and applications of dairy fats.
Fenema Workshop

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

TBD
Meat Hybrids and Analogs: Product Trends, Research, and Nutrition

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273

Historically, protein advancements have primarily focused on animal based muscle, milk, and eggs. However in recent years, consumers increasing curiosity into protein heavy diets and concern for food manufacturing processes has fueled the development of all protein sources, especially alternatives to animal-based. This rapid development of alternative meat-like and plant-based protein alternatives in the recent decade has drastically shifted the light in which protein is now viewed, researched, and consumed. Plant-based protein inclusion into traditionally meat-centric meals and eating habits is not a new concept, nor is inclusion of plant fibers into processed meats; but, deliberately enhancing processed meats with plant proteins, or hybridizing, is emerging. Development of meat-like analogs and, subsequently, meat-plant hybrids has exploded as a result. Major restaurant chains have been adding alternative proteins to menus for a few years now, but recently hybrids are also starting to gain popularity as well. Research shows that inclusion of plant fibers and proteins can standardize and benefit the nutritional value and functionality of processed meats. Processing advancements in the industry have greatly improved the eating experience of meatless analogs by better improving texture and flavor and meat-plant hybrids and analogs serve to marry and amplify the best components of plant and animal ingredients. Developing a deeper understanding of the role meat-plant hybrids in the rapidly changing protein market will provide tools for food scientists and industry experts to push the envelope of protein product and process developments. This session is a collaboration between IFT's Muscle Foods Division, Protein Division and Phi Tau Sigma.
Consumer Choice, Not a New Nicholas Sparks Novel, Rather How We Observe and Measure Matters

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385

The goal of this curated symposium is to present IFT members with a dialog between industry professionals on the real truths and myths behind practices that are thought to be commonly agreed upon approaches. When planning a research study, choice behavior is often overlooked. Choice behavior seems arbitrary, but the truth (or myth) on the issue is much more involved and elaborate than quickly running a consumer study. The literature tells us there is an underlying non-cognitive principle to the matter, as well as imparting context and the decision process consumers make/follow. The Sensory and Consumer Sciences Division (SCSD) has selected a number of practicing professionals to discuss this area and provide understanding to both the division membership and the greater food and beverage product design and development community on the status of this area of interest.
Ultraviolet Treatment of Beverages: From Theory to Practice

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392

Ultraviolet (UV) light has been used for decades for disinfecting water, and is broadly applied in Europe and North America. But until recently it has not been adopted for opaque fluids such as liquid foods and beverages. Recently, successful application in juice treatment has demonstrated the feasibility of UV for treating these fluids, and UV technology has started to emerge as a promising non-thermal preservation processes for other beverages. As a non-thermal, non-chemical disinfection technology, UV is anticipated to have minimal effects on product quality, flavor, and nutritive content. UV treatment is effective against food and water borne pathogens, spoilage microflora, spores, and can control pathogen levels to comply with regulatory requirements. The challenge remains that the range of optical and other properties of beverages is extremely broad. Also, each disinfection process may have different microbiological targets, meaning that each UV process has to be developed individually using specific system designs. In each application, three factors must be assessed: the treatment level required for the necessary reduction in target pathogen levels; the impact on product quality; and the regulatory requirements.
 
Since the challenges of implementing UV are both theoretical and practical, this symposium has been designed as collaboration between academic, government research, and UV industry experts. This symposium will briefly introduce the fundamental principles of UVC light germicidal effects and present approaches for evaluation of product and process parameters in applications of this technology for liquid foods and solid surfaces.
 
The first focused presentation will address the commercialization of UVC light application for non-thermal pasteurization of water in the dairy industry and requirements for regulatory compliance with the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance that governs the production of Class A dairy products.
 
The second presentation will discuss UV treatment for beverages with high absorption and scattering properties. The effect of fluid optical properties on achieving required log reduction of food-borne pathogens will be discussed, and inactivation of relevant pathogens will be demonstrated.
 
The third presentation will discuss the application of UV treatment to milk, in order to inactivate Cronobacter sakazakii. The presenter will discuss results of a feasibility study of UVC light application to reduce Cronobacter sakazakii in milk. The D-values for different strains of Cronobacter sakazakii will be discussed; in addition data on UV dose response curves of different strains of Cronobacter sakazakii will be presented.