Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

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Current Innovations, Challenges, and Strategies in Extrusion of Plant-Based Proteins

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:40 PM - 01:40 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

Recent trends in food extrusion technology and research have been mainly directed to the development of sustainable and functional foods. This trend can be strongly related to the increased consumer awareness on the role of food products and processes on environment, health, and wellbeing. Extrusion technology offers many advantages due to its multifunctional nature combining several functions, e.g. mixing, shearing, cooking, and cooling, in one unit operation. Extrusion can be leveraged to process a wide range of raw materials with desired product characteristics and functional properties. Extrusion of proteins from various plants (e.g. soy, wheat, or pea) is an example for the application of this technology to design sustainable and functional food products.

Extrusion has been used since the 1960s for making texturized vegetable protein (TVP) and since the 1990s for exploring and advancing high-moisture extrusion of plant proteins, which have been widely used today for making commercial meat substitutes. Especially in the last decade we have seen great breakthrough product innovations, e.g. meatless burgers, schnitzel, or sausages, chicken-free strips, or cheese analog. Although the application of extrusion processing to plant proteins is not a new technology, systematic studies and related know-how and insights in this field are very limited. The protein-based formulations category could use more breakthrough extrusion technology innovation and would greatly benefit from more fundamental research to understand ingredient and process interactions and how they relate to making quality products at affordable rates. This is a great and motivating opportunity for more fundamental and applied research in this field.

The goal of this session is to highlight innovations in this exciting area and present latest results in research and development. The speakers represent different fields, including the food industry, academia, and research institutes, and will give their perspectives of the state of the art and the business. The presentations will highlight relevant topics of protein extrusion, including the use of IP mapping for assessing the latest innovations, product concepts, and design principles, assessment of the product’s environmental impact by life cycle assessment, as well as product development strategies. Leveraging extrusion technology for innovative and new plant protein-based foods will greatly support the consumers desire to shift their diets toward more plant proteins. Learning about extrusion of plant-based proteins and advancing this technology poses a great opportunity area for food technologists to contribute to food security and a sustainable future.

*Our thanks to Axiom for their sponsorship of the Alternative Protein Deep Dive programming*
Brigham Young University Alumni Breakfast, IFT18

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 07:00 AM - 08:00 AM

Where: Hyatt McCormick - Burnham AB

Alumni Breakfast for Food Science Graduates of Brigham Young University.
Formulating for Function: Winning Nutrition and Consumer Preference on Food Product Development using Dietary Fiber, Hydrocolloid, and Starch

When: Saturday, 07/14/2018 through Sunday, 07/15/2018, 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Where: Hilton Chicago, Room: Continental B

Nutrition and texture ingredients, dietary fibers, hydrocolloids, and starches are primary components in developing food products with the desired nutrition and texture. With all the choices available, selecting the right ingredients for your product can be challenging. This 2-day interactive course will provide guidance on the use of dietary fibers, hydrocolloids and starches for food product design by learning about structure-function relationships, relevant regulatory aspects, and hands-on demonstrations. This course will emphasize providing preferable taste and texture while 1) satisfying consumer demand for a clean label with natural ingredient technologies, and 2) improving nutritional value through current and emerging dietary fiber technologies.

Program Focus:
  • Product Development & Ingredient Innovations
  • Food Health & Nutrition
Appropriate for Intermediate-Level Professionals In:
  • Product Development
  • Research & Development
  • Processing Development
  • Nutrition
  • Sensory & Consumer Science
Continuing Education Hours: 14

Individuals holding these credentials will earn 14 hours* for completion of this course: Certified Food Scientists; Registered Dietitians; Dietetic Technicians; Certified Research Chefs; Certified Culinary Scientists.

*Subject to change plus or minus one hour based on final agenda.

REGISTRATION: click here to register.
Premier Member and New Professional Members: $690.00
Networking and Engagement Members: $780.00
Non-Members: $865.00
IFT Student Members: $300.00

All prices to increase $100 after June 1.

As part of your registration, you will receive course materials, lunches, refreshment breaks, and a certificate of attendance. Course presentation materials are distributed electronically; bringing your laptop or tablet is recommended.
Presentation Theater - QUALISOY

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 01:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - North Hall, Booth N7230

Learn how consumer trends are driving sustainable practices on Monday, July 16, from 1:30 – 2 p.m. Enjoy turnovers made with U.S.-grown high oleic soybean shortening, courtesy of QUALISOY, and hear from a consumer trends forecaster and from a U.S. soybean farmer about sustainability.
IFTNEXT: Launching a Food and Beverage Business (with The Hatchery)

When: Saturday, 07/14/2018 through Sunday, 07/15/2018, 09:00 AM - 04:00 PM

Where: Hilton Chicago, Room: Williford C

The food sector continues to rise with new and innovative product concepts, culinary-focused technologies, artisanal movements and market disrupting snacks. As the specialty food industry reaches sales of over $120 billion, there are increasing opportunities for emerging food and beverage startups to change the industry landscape.

Whether you’re looking to start your own food business, have recently launched, or would simply like to learn more about the industry as a whole, this 2-day workshop is the perfect introduction.

Through a series of presentations, seminars, interactive sessions, workshops and real-world examples you will be able to get a holistic perspective of the food industry and what it truly takes to launch and grow a successful food and beverage company. Hear from industry experts, specialty attorneys, branding coaches and finance gurus who will help you understand the key features to operating a sustainable business. Plus! You’ll get to hear directly from successful entrepreneurs who have experienced these challenges firsthand with a specialty entrepreneurship panel.

This 2-day workshop will cover:
  • Industry trends and insights
  • Regulations & Licensing
  • Insurance
  • Branding
  • Trademarks and IP Protection
  • Financial Planning
  • Business Entity
  • Marketing Strategies
  • And more!
Continuing Education Hours: 12
Individuals holding these credentials will earn 12 hours* for completion of this course: Certified Food Scientists; Registered Dietitians; Dietetic Technicians; Certified Research Chefs; Certified Culinary Scientists.

*Subject to change plus or minus one hour based on final agenda.

REGISTRATION:click here to register.
Premier Member and New Professional Members: $690.00
Networking and Engagement Members: $780.00
Non-Members: $865.00
IFT Student Members: $300.00

All prices to increase $100 after June 1.

As part of your registration, you will receive course materials, lunches, refreshment breaks, and a certificate of attendance.
Who's Driving Personalized Nutrition and Why?

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 04:45 PM - 05:15 PM

Where: McCormick Place - IFTNEXT Stage

There's a lot of buzz about Personalized Nutrition, but what is it and how did consumers come to demand these custom health solutions? In this session, we will talk about why Personalized Nutrition is relevant in today's marketplace, how clean label fits in, as well as how and why consumers have changed-up the traditional paradigm of health and wellness. Learn more about how the consumer evolved, what their new expectations are, and what food and beverage manufacturers and marketers need to do to deliver the customization that consumers want. Don't miss this stimulating discussion.
Food Science for the Non-Food Scientist

When: Saturday, 07/14/2018 through Sunday, 07/15/2018, 08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Where: Hilton Chicago, Room: Continental A

One of IFT’s most popular courses will help you better understand and communicate with your technical teams and customers. Learn the basic principles of food science and equip yourself with an enhanced understanding of the role of food science in the development of food products. Gain a better understanding of the importance of food safety, basic regulatory issues and food science trends.

Continuing Education Hours: 14
Individuals holding these credentials will earn 14 hours* for completion of this course: Certified Food Scientists; Registered Dietitians; Dietetic Technicians; Certified Research Chefs; Certified Culinary Scientists.

*Subject to change plus or minus one hour based on final agenda.

REGISTRATION:click here to register.
Premier Member and New Professional Members: $690.00
Networking and Engagement Members: $780.00
Non-Members: $865.00
IFT Student Members: $300.00

All prices to increase $100 after June 1.

As part of your registration, you will receive course materials, lunches, refreshment breaks, and a certificate of attendance. Course presentation materials are distributed electronically; bringing your laptop or tablet is recommended.
Gilbert A. Leveille Award and Lectureship: Whole Food Approach for Chronic Disease Prevention

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 03:30 PM - 04:15 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404BC

More and more scientific evidence suggests that a healthy eating pattern with increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other plant-based foods is associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, cataracts, and age-related diseases. Bioactive compounds in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains may, in part, be responsible for their health benefits. Recent research demonstrated whole foods play important roles in reducing the incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases. Our group proposed that the major health benefits of a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are predominately attributed to the additive and synergistic interactions of bioactive compounds and other food components in whole foods by targeting multiple signal transduction pathways with multiple mechanisms of action. Whole foods play important roles in reducing the incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases. This presentation will discuss our current research on health-promoting synergies and interactions of bioactive compounds and nutrients in whole foods for chronic disease prevention and healthy aging, and focus on the plausible mechanisms of action behind the biological effects.
Is It Time to Change the Paradigm for Food Toxicology? Nitrate as a Case Study

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Nitrate is an anion produced naturally in the body, it occurs naturally in the environment, and it is also used as a fertilizer as well as a food additive, sometimes together with nitrite. Human exposure occurs readily, since it is part of a normal diet, primarily via consumption of vegetables (typically 60-80%), though nitrate is also found in fruits, dairy products, cured meats, fish, beers, water, and cereals. In recent years, significant human health benefits have been reported for nitrate, especially for cardiovascular effects such as blood pressure, platelets, endothelial function, mitochondrial efficiency, and exercise, as well as those health benefits that are typically associated with a diet high in vegetable content. Historically, going back over 70 years, however, there have been some reported health concerns related to nitrate exposure involving the occurrence of methemoglobinemia, an effect which is now understood to be limited to infants and which is confounded by other factors (e.g., gastroenteritis), as well as being associated with high-dose nitrate exposures in well water. While multiple nitrate toxicity values have been developed by several public health and regulatory agencies (USEPA, 1991; ATSDR, 2015), the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has also established an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI), but it is the only value unique to food consumption as a source of exposure. ADIs by definition are estimates of a food additive that can be ingested daily over a lifetime without appreciable health risk. The current JECFA ADI for nitrate is 0-3.7 mg/kg-day. However, those consumers around the world with high-vegetable intake diets, such as those on the “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” (DASH Diet), have nitrate intakes that greatly exceed the JEFCA ADI. Unfortunately, this ADI is based solely on effects seen in a chronic rat toxicology bioassay, which is in turn based on the current toxicology paradigm of using the results of animal toxicity studies to estimate possible human risk. This symposium will summarize the current science on dietary nitrate (and nitrite) as important precursors of nitric oxide (NO), which is an important cell-signaling molecule and potent vasodilator. It will also propose an alternative paradigm of reassessing the potential human health effects of nitrate, seeking to establish an evidence-based, health-protective ADI that takes into account the complexities surrounding nitrate, including effects such as the beneficial physiological role of nitrate and nitrite in maintaining adequate NO levels, the relevance of exposure scenarios associated with adverse effects, differential kinetics by age and species, and the health benefits of diets high in nitrate-rich vegetables and fruits.
Scientific & Applied Sessions

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where:

Search scientific program sessions by specific topic, such as emerging trends, new developments, and commodity areas, as well as experience level, speaker, track, event, time, and more using the IFT18 Online Planner.