Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA
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Schedule

Below is an overview of all the exciting programs, sessions, networking opportunities, and more waiting for you at IFT19. To create a personal schedule, visit the IFT19 Online Planner & Mobile App page, available in mid April.

Note: Schedule is subject to change.

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  • Saturday June 01
  • Sunday June 02
  • Monday June 03
  • Tuesday June 04
  • Wednesday June 05
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    Meetings Emerging Leaders Network (Invitation Only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 252-254
    The IFT Emerging Leaders Network (ELN) is a highly selective global leadership program established for new professionals in the science of food who are eager to expand their leadership skills. The program is designed to bridge the gap between the participant's academic experience and their on-the-job training.
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    Short Course Microencapsulation in the Food and Beverage Industries (2 day) New Orleans Marriott
    In this two-day short course, you will gain a deeper understanding of the art and science leading to the physical and chemical methods of microencapsulation. Learn how to apply techniques to protect, mask, and ultimately deliver food and beverage ingredients that meet consumer demands. This program will include both technical and practical information relating to the development and application of microencapsulation and nanoencapsulations as well as a review of quality, regulatory, and future market perspectives. These applications will be visualized through a series of hands-on demonstrations. This program will empower participants to use these ingredients in product development. 
     
    Attendees will:
    • Acquire a solid working knowledge of the fundamentals of microencapsulation and nanoencapsulation processing techniques
    • Understand the materials used for microencapsulation and nanoencapsulation techniques
    • Review testing, evaluation, regulatory, and economics of microencapsulated materials
    • Consider microencapsulation for protecting, masking, and controlled delivery of functional food and beverage ingredients

     
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    Short Course Plant Proteins: Functionalities and Applications (2 day) New Orleans Marriott
    There is growing consumer appetite for plant-based food due to a myriad of factors, including health, environmental sustainability, and personal beliefs. As more novel plant proteins are developed and commercialized, these new ingredient innovations enable product developers and research scientists to launch a variety of plant-based products. During this course, we will explore familiar and novel plant proteins, discussing their properties, functionalities, and applications across multiple food and beverage categories.

    Attendees will:
    • Examine fundamental functional properties of different plant proteins as well as their applications in different food products
    • Gain a deeper sense of the discoveries and processing methods that allows the commercialization of these protein ingredients and their behaviors (solubility, gelling, foaming, binding, etc.) in different environments and food types
    • Apply your learning in activities and network with other participants. 
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    Short Course FSPCA Intentional Adulteration: Conducting Vulnerability Assessments (1 day) New Orleans Marriott
    This course is recognized as qualified training to meet the requirements of the FSMA final rule, “Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration” (IA rule) coming into effect starting July 2019. This course provides hands-on learning opportunities that provide participants with the information and skills necessary to conduct a vulnerability assessment in accordance with the IA rule requirements. This course is an excellent opportunity to engage directly with policy-makers, including at least one expert from the FDA. An FSPCA certificate is awarded for successful completion of the course.

    Participants will:
    • Learn to conduct a vulnerability assessment that considers the three fundamental elements outlined in the IA rule.
    • Gain a solid understanding of the IA rule's general requirements, helpful preliminary steps for implementation, how to apply the hybrid approach, and reanalysis requirements.  
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    Short Course Nonthermal Processing of Food: Commercialization, Technical Advances, Acceptance, and Sustainability (2 day) New Orleans Marriott
    This short course showcases basic principles, applications and successful commercialization of Nonthermal technologies ranging from the emerging to the established. Instructors will highlight basic concepts and the benefits, drawbacks, and potential commercial uses of each technology. Format includes lecture, group discussions, panels, and one-on-one interactions with nonthermal technology experts. Instructors will use case studies to illustrate how these innovative technologies meet industry challenges for Food Safety, Food Quality, Consumer Acceptance, and Sustainability.

    Topics include:
    • Novel, emerging, and advanced nonthermal technologies.
    • Fundamental concepts and principles
    • Commercial success - case studies.
    • Enhancing safety, quality, acceptance, and sustainability.
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    Short Course Certified Food Scientist (CFS) Preparatory Course (2 day) New Orleans Marriott
    This optional course is designed to help people considering or preparing to the Certified Food Scientist exam to earn their CFS credential. A “crash course” in all eight content areas covered on the exam, this course brings in experts from academia and industry to go over the key topics and concepts in their respective content area, and share real-life examples to help attendees understand the application of the concepts. A resource for CFS candidates with various backgrounds and from many countries, this course attracts a broad audience of professionals looking to enhance their knowledge and demonstrate their understanding of the wide area of food science.
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    Short Course Labeling Requirements and Implications for Foods Marketed in the U.S. (2 day) New Orleans Marriott
    Food labeling requirements in the U.S. are complex, and you need to stay ahead of the curve as they continue to be redefined. This course will provide you with the foundational and practical knowledge you need to comply with new and established labeling laws and regulations. Instructors will also cover emerging issues in regulation and labeling to help regulation professionals and product developers reformulate and react to marketplace drivers such as clean/clear labeling, corporate social responsibility, and responsible sourcing.social responsibility, and responsible sourcing) they need to understand the regulatory implications. 
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    Short Course Survey of Flavor Technology: Applications and Interactions (2 day) New Orleans Marriott
    One of IFT’s most popular courses provides you an overview of flavor chemistry and technology, interaction of flavors with food ingredients, application of flavors in food products, and the assessment of flavor quality changes. This two-day face-to-face course covers in-depth training about the physical and chemical composition of flavors, sensory evaluation and descriptions of flavors, and the regulatory framework for use of flavor ingredients in the food and beverage industries.  Interactive hands-on activities will ensure your understanding of key points in the lectures 
     
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    Short Course Food Science for the Non-Food Scientist (2 day) New Orleans Marriott
    One of IFT’s most popular courses will help you better understand and communicate with your technical teams and customers.  Learn the basic principles of food science and equip yourself with an enhanced understanding of the role of food science in the development of food products. Gain a better understanding of the importance of food safety, basic regulatory issues and food science trends.
     
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    Meetings Section Leadership Forum New Orleans Marriott - Bissonet (3rd floor)
    The annual Section Leadership Forum is designed to provide a variety of learning and interaction opportunities for IFT section leaders.  Each section is invited to send three participants from 2018-19 or 2019-20 leadership.
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    Meetings Emerging Leaders Network (Invitation Only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 252-254
    The IFT Emerging Leaders Network (ELN) is a highly selective global leadership program established for new professionals in the science of food who are eager to expand their leadership skills. The program is designed to bridge the gap between the participant's academic experience and their on-the-job training.
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    Meetings Division Innovation Lab Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 243-245
    This event is for Division leaders to brainstorm, share best practices, collaborate, and plan for the year ahead.
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    Meetings, Student IFTSA Chapter Leaders Workshop Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 343
    The Chapter Leaders Workshop is designed for incoming IFTSA chapter leaders and Area Meeting Chairs to meet other student leaders at food science clubs from around the world. Workshop participants will grow as leaders, learn about how IFTSA can help your club succeed in the year to come, and have a lot of fun.
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    Short Course IFTNEXT: Design Thinking for the Creative Food Scientist (1 day) New Orleans Marriott
    How might we close the gap between food science and understanding true consumer needs? Design thinking is a human-centered innovation processes that helps people from all disciplines unlock creativity in their everyday work to solve complex challenges. With over 20 combined years of experience in Design Thinking in the food industry, government and academia, instructors will introduce the principles and processes of Design Thinking for Food. In this hands-on workshop, participants will work in teams on food and beverage challenges. learning and practicing design thinking skills such as Designer's Insight and Inspiration, The Rules of Brainstorming, and Rough and Rapid Prototyping. By learning and experiencing design thinking, participants will be able to apply these principles to their everyday work to become more human-centered food scientists.
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    Student, Meetings IFTSA Competition Kitchen Tours Banquet Kitchen (3rd floor)
    IFTSA Product Development Teams can receive a preview of the food prep space prior to competitions on Tuesday. Teams will also have the opportunity to store their competition supplies in the Kitchens.
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    Student Food Communicators Workshop Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - TBD
    Students and new professionals can participate in this three-hour Science Communication Fundamentals Workshop at IFT19 for a small program fee. Participants will learn how to effectively communicate the science of food to multiple audiences. Participants will learn how to identify a public engagement goal, determine the relevant audience, craft tailored messages to achieve their goal, and rehearse their engagement scenario. This workshop features both facilitator presentations and attendee exercises.
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    Dairy Foods Division Manfred Kroger Oral Competition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283 - 285
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    Food Microbiology Division Oral Competition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288 - 290
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    Protein Division Oral Competition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271 - 273
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    Food Chemistry Division Oral Competition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275 - 277
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    Sensory & Consumer Sciences Division Rose Marie Pangborn Oral Competition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291 - 292
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    Meetings Food Science Communicator Media Training (Invitation Only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 242
    Invitation Only Event - This session will offer an interactive panel discussion on how to work with the media, tips for getting quoted, and review IFT’s messaging matrix.
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    Meetings IFSCC Meeting New Orleans Marriott - Studio 7 (2nd floor)
    The International Food Science Certification Commission (IFSCC) oversees the governance and policy making of the Certified Food Scientist (CFS) program.
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    Student, Meetings First Timers Session for Students Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 345
    IFTSA knows that the first time you attend an IFT Annual Event it can be overwhelming. Join us for this session on Sunday afternoon to ensure that you get a solid overview of the show along with tips for the best ways to maximize you time at IFT19.
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    Student, Networking & Social IFTSA Student Lounge Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 353-355
    To meet up with students, visit the Student Lounge, sponsored by PepsiCo. Be sure to stop by and pick up your student events brochure, OFG, and PepsiCo swag! Representatives from PepsiCo will be on hand, during specific times, to talk about all of the internship and full-time opportunities available with PepsiCo.
     
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    Awards & Competitions, Networking & Social Fellows Recognition Forum Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 255-256
    Join us to celebrate the 2019 Class of Fellows to honor their exemplary achievements and contributions to the food science profession.  IFT Fellow is a unique professional distinction conferred on individuals with outstanding, extraordinary qualifications and contributions to the food science and technology field.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $45/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Awards & Competitions Awards Celebration Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    Each year, you can join us for the IFT Awards Celebration to honor and celebrate recipients of the prestigious IFT Achievement Awards and newly elected IFT Fellows. At this coveted event where recipients will be recognized for their outstanding contributions to the field of food science and technology, outstanding scientific advancement, excellence in teaching, and research and commitment to IFT service.
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    Networking & Social Welcome Reception Mardi Gras World
    Join colleagues and fellow attendees for a fun networking event to kick off IFT19 in New Orleans!  Drinks and appetizers will be served so come mix, mingle, and network!
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    Networking & Social Feeding Tomorrow Fun Run + Fitness Audubon Park
    Feeding Tomorrow is hosting its annual Fun Run + Fitness event, our largest annual fundraiser supporting student scholarships. Participants can run, walk, yoga, bike, or swim…anywhere, anytime with the option to participate virtually from May 1st – June 5th! Or you can join us in the Big Easy at IFT19 on Monday, June 3rd for a 5k run, 1-mile walk, and yoga followed by a celebratory after party, complete with goodies from our generous sponsors!

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Fun Run + Fitness is $30/person with an option to purchase a tshirt.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Brigham Young University Alumni & Friends Breakfast New Orleans Marriott - Studio 6 (2nd floor)
    Annual BYU Alumni and Friends Breakfast.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $20/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social North Carolina State University Breakfast New Orleans Marriott - Gallerie 2 (2nd floor)
    The Department of Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences at NC State invites you to join us for breakfast with alumni, stakeholders, faculty, staff and current students.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $60/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social IFT Prayer Breakfast Ruby Slipper (2001 Burgundy St., New Orleans, LA)
    The IFT Prayer Breakfast is open to all and will feature a guest speaker.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $35/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Meetings Marketing, Sales and Management Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Gallerie 5 (2nd floor)
    Kick off your day with breakfast with IFT's Marketing & Management Division. Converse over coffee and share best practices with your
    pastries.
    Fruit, pastries, coffee, fruit water, granola and protein smoothies will be served.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $15, Student - $5
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Food Microbiology, Food Health & Nutrition Integrity and Innovation in Probiotic Formulation Ernest N. Morial Convention Center 283-285
    Consumer acceptance of probiotics has grown rapidly over the past few years and the market for probiotics consumed by humans is estimated at $6.8 billion in 2018 with a CAGR of 8.3%, leading to a value of $12.7 billion in 2026. The total probiotics industry is predicted grow to an expected value of $64 billion by 2022 with a CAGR of ~7.0% from 2017-2022. The currently accepted definition of probiotics, proposed by a working group of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO), is: “live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host”. For consumers and suppliers alike, the key concerns are: (1) what health benefits and which microorganisms provide them; (2) how do I know that there is an “adequate amount” still alive at the end of shelf life, and; (3) how do I know which microorganisms are present and possibly at what relative concentrations in a blend. This symposium will address all three questions with examples of current best practices and leading-edge technologies.
     
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    Food Chemistry, Food Health & Nutrition NMR Applications in Food Science and Nutrition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    Despite the increasing popularity of NMR spectroscopy among food scientists, it is still an underutilized methodology in this field, mainly due to the lack of expertise by many food scientists. In this session we will try to bridge the knowledge gap that may exist when attempting to apply NMR techniques in food science and nutrition. We will cover the basic principles required to apply NMR on the study of foods, nutrients, and biological fluids. A brief description of chemometrics will be provided. Finally, an overview of recent and key applications in the areas of compositional analysis, food authentication, quality control, and human nutrition will be presented.
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    Teaching & Learning Understanding IFT Approval Guidelines, the Application Submission Process, and the Higher Education Review Board (HERB) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    This session is designed to assist food science faculty and/or administrators involved with IFT Approval with gaining an understanding of the 2018 IFT Approval Guidelines, the new online application submission process, and the revised HERB review timeline. Upon completion of the session, attendees will be able to apply the 2018 IFT Approval Guidelines to their own program approval and use the submission platform.
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    Food Safety & Defense California Prop 65: Everything You Need to Know Before You're Asked About It Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    Prop 65 is an ever-changing regulatory area, with complex requirements, frequent legal actions and strict labeling or notification regulations. Food manufacturers are encouraged to participate to learn strategies to navigate the complexity under Prop 65.
     
    Riding a wave of high-tech and an overall upward economic surge, California now boasts the world’s fifth largest economy. In 2018, California government reports indicate that the state is outpacing the nation in economic growth and the idea of maintaining a business in California can be profitable. However along with thoughts of increased economic opportunities, there are numerous hurdles to contend with. The LA Times reports that Los Angeles as the world’s most traffic clogged city and in 2018, it ranked poorly in the natural and social environment categories. California also boasts one of the most complex and conservative state regulations for almost every product sold or made in the state. It’s known as CA Prop 65 and its complexity of laws and interpretations of laws have created unnecessary hurdles for food companies to understand.
     
    According to the CA EPA’s Office of Environmental Health, Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), CA Prop 65 dates back to 1986 when California voters approved an initiative to address their growing concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. That initiative became the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, better known by its original name of Proposition 65
     
    Today, CA Proposition 65 “requires the State to publish a list of chemicals known to cause cancer or birth defects or other reproductive harm. This list (also known as “listings”) which must be updated at least once a year, has grown to include approximately 800 chemicals since it was first published in 1987.” And many of those compounds are in food and beverages; they include certain approved ingredients, naturally occurring compounds as well as food packaging compounds. One recent example of a proposed listing is coffee on the basis of acrylamide, naturally occurring. One might ask, how does Prop 65 impact my ability to produce safe and affordable food in California or any place else. What do I need to know to tell my suppliers, customers, senior leadership and the public? Does Prop 65 mean the food is safe or not safe?
     
    These are sample questions that will be explored in this primer session on Prop 65. Speakers will provide a general overview of Prop 65, with expert perspectives to increase attendees understanding about the regulation and the process. A case study example will be illustrated to help attendees legally navigate the complex system. Participants will also discuss their impact on the U.S. regulatory decision making process as well as public perceptions about food safety. 
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    Student, Networking & Social IFTSA Student Lounge Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 233-355
    To meet up with students, visit the Student Lounge, sponsored by PepsiCo. Be sure to stop by and pick up your student events brochure, OFG, and PepsiCo swag! Representatives from PepsiCo will be on hand, during specific times, to talk about all of the internship and full-time opportunities available with PepsiCo.
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    Harnessing the Power of Difference: Temple Grandin Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    World-renowned researcher, activist, and best-selling author Temple Grandin will explore the power of difference and how bringing together a diverse and inclusive team helps companies become innovation leaders and trendsetters.
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    Aunt Sally's Pralines Aunt Sally's Pralines
    The click-clack of a horse-drawn carriage on a cobblestone street, the sweet smell of warm pralines and sounds of jazz drifting through the air - When people fall in love with New Orleans, it is these senses that fill their hearts. Over 80 years ago, Aunt Sally’s founders lit a fire under a copper pot with the ambitious goal of bringing some of these tastes, smells, and love of New Orleans to the world.  On this tour guest will visit Aunt Sally’s production areas while processing is occurring.  The group will learn the art of candy making and process techniques, including candy chemistry, candy crystallization, temperature control and environment.  And of course the tour would not be complete without a praline tasting!  Tour includes substantial walking and standing.  Non-slip closed toe shoes are required.  Facilities reserve the right to review registration lists and deny participation to individuals they deem as having a conflict of interest.  Participants may be required to sign a confidentiality agreement.

    Shuttle to Aunt Sally's Pralines will leave from the Ernest N. Morial Convnention Center at 9:30am.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event ($34/person) and are required to be purchased prior to the event. Click here to register for this event!
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    Meetings Higher Education Review Board (HERB) - Closed Meeting Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 240
    The Higher Education Review Board meets to discuss matters related to IFT Undergraduate Program Approval.
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    IFTNEXT Start-Up Alley Showcase Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Get to know the the companies featured at IFT19's Start-Up Alley
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    Food Health & Nutrition Microbiome Deep Dive Welcome Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
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    Overview of Gut Microbiome, Diet and Health Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    The opening presentation will provide an overview of the gut microbiome and its importance on host health. A discussion on how different diets and dietary components may impact the composition and activity of the microbes residing in the gastrointestinal tract, and how those changes may affect host health outcomes, will follow.
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    Poster Session 1 - Biotechnology; Dairy Foods; Food Chemistry Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Hall J
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    ePoster Session 2: Food Chemistry Part 2 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 5: Biotechnology, Food Chemistry, and Carbohydrate Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 1: Food Chemistry Part 1 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 3: Food Chemistry Part 3 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 6: Dairy Foods Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 4: Aquatic Food Products Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    Food Processing & Packaging, Food Engineering Twenty Years of Advancements in Nonthermal Food Processing Technologies: Guiding Factors and a Look to the Future, Part I Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    This two-part symposium will cover twenty years of progress in building a sound base of research and engineering to establish several key novel food processes using different efficient modes of energy to improve quality, safety, and shelf life of a variety of foods to meet demands of the 21st century consumer. The Nonthermal Processing Division, which was established in 1999, provided a platform for collaborative multidisciplinary research and development activities that defined pathways for commercialization of advanced food technologies in many countries around the world. Part one of this symposium will focus on the strategies used to guide research and development efforts to guide movement of technologies up the ladders from bench scale research to pilot plant demonstrations of real products and then the scale-up to industrial production. One key role of the Division was to provide a focus for collaborative efforts that involved academic, industrial and government scientists and engineers, from several disciplines and many countries, to facilitate effective technology transfer to put improved minimally processed foods in the hands of consumers around the world. Several leaders of the Division’s efforts will provide summary presentations and there will be a panel of experts at the end of part two to stimulate a discussion with the audience of prospects for future developments in this growing segment of the international food industry. This symposium is proposed in honor of the 20th Anniversary of the Founding of the Nonthermal Processing Division.
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    Food Startups and the Risks They Pose Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262
    The number of food startups has increased dramatically in the last 5 years. Inspired by the goal of “changing the way we eat,” teams from both inside and outside the food industry have been bringing non-traditional products to market with varying degrees of success. This trend has disrupted the standard business norms in the industry. This discussion will analyze a few facets of that disruption and demonstrate the impact to larger established businesses.
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    Product Development & Ingredient Innovations, Public Policy, Food Laws & Regulations 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: Opportunities for Customization Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    Mandated by the 2014 Farm Bill, the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) will include guidance for the first time for women who are pregnant as well as infants and toddlers from birth to 24 months. For the 2020-2025 dietary guidelines, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) have proposed a life stage approach to establish the dietary guidance, with focus on the dietary intake and nutrients of public health concern for each stage of life, namely infants and toddlers (birth to 2 years), children and adolescents (2-18 years), adults (19-64 years), pregnancy and lactation, and older adults (over 65 years in age). 
     
    This new approach, presents opportunities for product development and personalizing nutrition based on the unique nutrition needs during various life stages. Public Law 101-445 (October 22, 1990) established the National Nutrition Monitoring Advisory Council and the reporting of Dietary Guidelines for Americans. At least every five years, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) members are charged to develop guidelines for the general public and national nutrition policy, which shall be based on the preponderance of the scientific and medical knowledge, current at the time the report is prepared. Historically, the topics and questions to be addressed by the DGAC were generated from public suggestions and guidance from either the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or USDA. As we approach the 9th edition of the DGA, unlike previous years, the topics and scientific questions were posted on the USDA website for public comment and finalized by USDA and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).
     
    During this session, three international nutrition experts will address topics related to dietary intake and nutrient requirements for women who are pregnant or lactating, infants and toddlers, and older adults.
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    Food Safety & Defense Are Your Facilities Protected? The Food Safety Modernization Act Intentional Adulteration Rule Is Here!
    The initial compliance date for the Food Safety Modernization Act final rule “Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration” is right around the corner: July 26 of this year. For the first time, domestic and foreign food facilities required to register under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act are required to minimize or prevent an act of intentional adulteration that could affect the U.S. food supply and cause wide scale public health harm. FDA’s senior IA/Food Defense experts will discuss rule requirements, guidance, trainings, tools and resources, compliance, and answer your questions about this new and groundbreaking regulation.
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    Sustainability Citrus Oil and Citrus Flavor Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-387
    Citrus is the most widely produced fruit in the world and grown in more than 80 countries. A wide spectrum of products are obtained from citrus fruits, which are extracted and purified into essential oils, antioxidants, and other compounds. Citrus oils, by-products of citrus juice processing, are among the most popular natural raw materials in flavor and fragrance-driven consumer goods. Carbonates, fruit and chewing gums, beer mixes, toothpastes, perfumes, household cleaners, and many other products partially depend on the citrus oils as flavor and fragrance ingredients. However, the supply side of citrus oils does not look bright. Climate instability is taking its toll on the citrus harvest and global fruit availability. Citrus greening disease or HLB (Huanglongbing) is affecting all varieties of citrus and has had a devastating impact on Florida and other regions including Mexico, Brazil, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, and Southeast Asia. The market demand for fresh citrus fruits and citrus oils is as high as always. This symposium will focus on the theme of citrus oil and citrus flavor sustainability.
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    Teaching & Learning Teaching General Education Courses as a Tool to Disseminate the Value of the Food Industry and as a Recruitment Tool Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392

    The food industry is constantly challenged by misinformation in the media about food safety, food nutrition, and food processing. Such misinformation has created myths that IFT and food scientists, in particular educators, need to debunk. First-year college students are immersed in the media and pull a lot of the information on food from there without the necessary tools to assess it. At the same time, more often than not, first-year students are uncertain on their major and they take courses that give them a glimpse of the different fields they are interested in. This creates an excellent opportunity for food science educators. General education (GE) courses are required as part of the foundation of undergraduate programs. Some of these courses, are also part of college or university-wide core curriculum, and they can focus on a vast array of topics. GE courses in food science attract science and non-science majors hence laying an opportunity to educate students about Food Science. In addition to providing science-supported information, there is evidence that such courses are very effective at recruiting undergraduate students into food science programs. The challenge developing GE courses is making them relevant and attractive to students as well as handling large groups (>100) compared to the typically small food science courses.
     
    On this roundtable, faculty from different universities that have successfully implemented general education courses in Food Science will share lessons learned and strategies to teach food science to large classes of mixed (science and non-science) majors while getting students excited about the topic.

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    Sensory Science Designing Food and Beverages for Niche Populations Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285
    Sensory science is advancing and to produce a successful and relevant food or beverage, the testing population or who you ask to evaluate your product is critically important. In the past, sensory testing was often performed on the population who was most convenient and this still may be applied in some cases for certain products. However, in more specialized populations, differences in taste and smell perception, restricted food choice and specialized nutritional requirements require that the testing be performed in these populations—extending results from a standard population does not provide a good indicator of product acceptance. 
     
    Thus, the overall objective of this session is to educate attendees on the importance of testing with specialized populations and the sensory considerations, including challenges and best practices, in working with various specialized groups. Even though this topic has great industry application and specialized populations are abundant in the consumer landscape, a session at IFT has not been organized around this area for a number of years. 
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    Food Chemistry Plant Protein Ingredients: Recent Advances in Processing Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273
    The global demand for plant proteins is increasing, primarily due to concerns with animal proteins such as cost and sustainability issues, health and dietary restrictions, and ethnic and religious reasons. To be a competitive alternative to the animal-based ingredients, a plant protein should meet the requirements of having acceptable nutritional, sensory, and functional properties. Plant proteins, in the forms of flours, concentrates, and isolates, are currently being incorporated in a wide range of food applications. However, both ingredient and consumer food manufacturers are facing challenges in obtaining plant proteins with desired properties. Therefore, development of new processing technologies to produce plant protein ingredients with improved functional and sensory properties and nutritional value is essential. The desired properties of plant proteins can be achieved by physical, chemical, and enzymatic modification approaches. For example, the molecular structure of the plant proteins can be modified to mimic proteins of animal origin, particularly in meat applications. The purpose of this symposium is to discuss the opportunities and challenges associated with new processing technologies on isolation, characterization, and modification of plant protein ingredients in order to use them successfully in food applications.
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    Food Engineering Biosensing Technology for Practical Applications in Food Production Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    The biosensors industry is now worth billions of US dollars, with applications mostly in the biomedical field. Many biosensing technologies have been developed for measuring small molecules, biomarkers, and whole cells that have the potential to be used in food production settings for the detection of foodborne pathogens, toxins, allergens, contaminants and biomarkers for food quality and safety. The development of biosensors will further serve the food industry, agricultural sector, regulatory community, and public health. However, there are challenges that prevent new biosensing technologies to become commercially available. These challenges include biosensor scalability, cost, repeatability, and manufacturing reproducibility. 
     
    This symposium will answer these challenges by featuring some recent and significant advances in the field of biosensing and its applications to food safety, food quality, and food processing. Presentations will provide insightful scientific and engineering analyses of biosensor systems, knowledge gaps, technology transfer challenges and future research directions. The speakers will address current innovations in biosensors for practical (point-of-service) applications in food production and discuss strategies and current efforts to translate their current research to real-life applications. To maximize the attendance and impact of this symposium, presenters have been carefully chosen for their diverse expertise on biosensing technologies. The presenters will speak on: rapid and highly sensitive immunosensing methods for visible detection of bacteria in real matrices; portable biosensors incorporating receptor molecules and redox active interfaces for monitoring functional ingredients in food and implementation in smart packaging; bacteriophage-based membrane filtration assays that employ novel fusion reporter enzymes to fully quantify E. coli in less than half the time required for traditional enrichment assays; and disposable biomimetic sensors based on graphene nanostructures for applications in low income and point of service environments such as during food production for real-time foodborne pathogen detection.
     
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    Sustainability Leveraging Big Data and Artificial Intelligence for Ushering Innovations from Farm to Fork Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390
    Computational intelligence and big data analytics are increasingly finding applications in food science research globally, and are likely to play a critical role in the food industry in the near future. These technologies can be integrated with the food industry operations from farm-to-fork to potentially deliver smart solutions to complex real-world problems such as simulation of vast agri-food systems, validation of process engineering models and performance prediction of protein molecules. Besides problem solving, these technologies can accelerate innovation and shorten product development cycles in the industry by substituting sensory panels with artificial intelligence (AI) systems, identifying relationships between food ingredients and human health, facilitating DNA-based diet personalization, process optimization, automated texture analysis, and identifying new ways of food waste reduction.
     
    This session proposal is jointly developed by four IFT Divisions, and brings five distinguished speakers from the academia and the industry to share the latest advances and challenges related to big data and AI application in food science research, product development, manufacturing, and consumer perceptions. The goal of this session is to integrate the scientific and technological merits of data-driven approaches with a mechanistic understanding of manufacturing processes. The session will also highlight the potential of artificial intelligence methods for research enhancement in processing and product development with sophisticated databases and computational approaches. The final presentation will summarize the current state in the context of a holistic agri-food system and identify potential sustainability benefits and future risks of AI progression.
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    Food Processing & Packaging, Sustainability Packaging Solutions to Reduce Food Waste: Packaging Case Studies Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    The number of packaging solutions to reduce food waste is abundant at first glance in comparison to other identified solutions such as improved date labeling. This is because many foods demand different packaging requirements for their proper protection. Assessing packaging solutions by their ability to halt major degradative reactions in specific food is the pragmatic, science-based approach that will be used in this session. Specifically, this session incorporates consumer research pinpointing how to best communicate packaging solutions to reduce food waste to consumers, packaging distribution testing and protocols that can be employed to reduce food waste from food manufacturers to retailer/consumers, nano-based barriers to coat food that reduce the need for synthetic packaging as well as extend shelf life, and the impact (dollars of food waste prevented) of packaging solutions for specific foods. Case studies on using packaging to reduce food waste highlight the actual food degradation that packaging solutions to food waste address.
  • -
    Professional Development The Art of Science Translation Competition IFT Central Booth
    Translating science is critical to the success of any scientist. This means effectively communicating why you’re focusing on that specific work, how you gathered the information, and what it means for the larger science community. Come watch finalists compete in translating their science to the broader scientific community! A visual notetaker will be capturing their presentations, making a physical translation of their science.
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    Food Safety & Defense Can We Win the Fight Against Food Fraud? Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Traceability Stage
    The Food Fortress initiative and the food industry intelligence network (fiin) across the UK and Ireland demonstrate that, by working together, industry and regulators can win the fight against food fraud and reduce our vulnerability significantly. This interactive panel session will highlight how easy it is to carry out food crimes and challenge the audience to learn from the 2 successful examples presented and consider what they are going to do to join the fight! Our session will showcase some great examples of innovative data and intelligence sharing across sectors of the industry and regulators, risk assessment and data analytics - focusing on authenticity and traceability to drive a safer food supply chain and protect the interests of the consumer.  The role of food scientists and technologists in collecting robust data, interpreting, validating and communicating the data will also be highlighted in the initiatives presented.
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    IFTNEXT 2020 Vision: Science Communication Challenges for the New Decade Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    This presentation offers a new paradigm for nutrition communicators by encouraging conduits of nutrition science information to take a more aggressive approach encouraging journalists to stop perpetuating nutrition and health myths. Too often, the very people who should be extinguishing the fires of misinformation are fanning the flames instead, either through a hasty approach to science, politicizing what should be a strictly science-based discipline, or using misleading reportage on nutrition science to serve a third-party agenda. Not only has this contributed to the decades of misguided advice and fad nutritionists, it has encouraged sound-bite science or the actual denigration of science. Focusing primarily on the most commonly miscommunicated issues of red meat, salt, corn syrup and similar “hot-button” ingredients, the presenters will demonstrate how chronic circumventing of science-based communication has handicapped nutrition communicators and the public for decades, and strategies to limit these miscommunications in the future.
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    Meetings Council of Food Science Administrators Luncheon and Workshop Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 244
    Invitation Only, ticketed event. Council of Food Science Administrators is a gathering of department heads and program chairs for undergraduate food science programs to share resources, best practices and engage in networking. Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $80/person.

    Click here to register for this event!
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 11am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food.  Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Public Policy, Food Laws & Regulations The Role of Probiotics and Gut Microbiome on Metabolic Health: An Overview on the Clinical Science and Market Positioning of Probiotics for Weight Management and Metabolic Syndrome Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    This presentation will provide an overview of probiotics as it relates to the gut microbiome and metabolic health, and the role of gut microbiome in weight management and fat loss.  Data from a recent clinical study on products that have been shown to improve biomarkers of obesity, by creating lasting changes in the gut, will be presented.  The presentation will also address current market trends and regulations related to probiotics.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 11:20am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food.  Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 11:40am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food.  Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Meetings JFSE Editorial Board Lunch (by invite only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 238
    Journal of Food Science Education Editorial Board meeting.
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 12pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food.  Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    IFTNEXT Food Production Consumer Perceptions and Social Media Trends Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Food production technologies aim to produce safe, nutritious and sustainable foods that consumers desire. But consumers do have perceived notions about some beneficial technologies, such as biotechnology (bioengineered foods), cell-cultured foods (“clean meat” production) or integrated pest management (pesticides), which may contribute to an off-putting feeling when making purchase decisions. Our presentation will unmask consumer perceptions about these technologies, explore how consumers prioritize concerns when making food choices and how they respond in social media to communication tactics.
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    Food Health & Nutrition, Food Chemistry Dietary Fiber Structure Controls on Gut Microbiome Composition and Function Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    Dr. Bruce Hamaker will provide context for how food carbohydrates interact with the gut microbiota to influence human nutrition and health. He will emphasize the impact of the interaction between gut microbiota and specific carbohydrate structures on human physiology, that stem from the tripartite interaction of carbohydrates, microbiota, and human physiology. Dr. Lindemann will address how carbohydrate structures, including fine structural variants, can have targeted impacts on certain species and genotypes within human gut microbiota, and the degree to which carbohydrate structure governs the composition and metabolism of microbiota. Further, this session will explore the idea that carbohydrates can be designed and blended to feed certain populations and control metabolic and health outcomes. The goal of the session is to provide context for the emerging use of carbohydrate structures in foods as a set of tools to manipulate the gut ecosystem toward improved health.
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    Meetings Refrigerated & Frozen Foods, Product Development and Foodservice Division Joint Event Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 245
    Enjoy a presentation and delicious luncheon with these three Divisions - a great way to connect with colleagues both new and old.
    A sit-down, plated lunch with be served.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
  • -
    Meetings Nutrition and Nutraceutical & Functional Foods Division Event Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 243
    Enjoy a presentation and delicious luncheon with these two Divisions - a great way to connect with colleagues both new and old.
    A sit-down, plated lunch with be served.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
  • -
    Professional Development Patents: Career Development and Business Intelligence IFT Central Booth
    This interactive session will explore how patents can help you elevate your career. You will learn to identify patent issues when working with third parties such as collaborators, vendors, and customers. You will also learn to identify patent issues in the product development process from ideation to commercialization. You'll also learn how a patent could be used as a form of business intelligence and as a marketing tool.
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    Meetings Food Laws & Regulations, Toxicology & Safety Evaluation and Quality Assurance Joint Division Event Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 255-257
    Enjoy a presentation and delicious luncheon with these two Divisions - a great way to connect with colleagues both new and old.
    A sit-down, plated lunch with be served.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 12:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food.  Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Meetings IFT Press Advisory Group Meeting Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 254
    Annual meeting of the IFT Press Advisory Group.
  • -
    Student, Awards & Competitions The 29th Annual IFTSA & MARS Product Development Competition - Oral Presentations Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 343-345
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 1pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food.  Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 1:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food.  Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    IFTNEXT How AI Can Help You Cope With Information Overload Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    A rigorous assessment of past research is an essential pre-requisite for innovation. Literature searches and reviews are increasingly problematic. The number of papers being published worldwide is increasing rapidly; predatory OA (fake science) journals are proliferating; and researchers are relying on flawed search tools (eg.Google Scholar and PubMed).
    This presentation looks at how new AI-powered search tools can be used to solve these information challenges in the sciences of food, health and nutrition. It explains how they can deliver relevant and comprehensive results, not just within the discipline but across disciplines. It also shows how they can be used to help formulate research hypotheses, identify researchers and institutions active in particular areas and identify hot topics.
    The presenter will be Jonathan Griffin, who works for IFIS Publishing, an educational, not-for-profit organization dedicated to understanding and meeting the information needs of the food community.
  • -
    Food Health & Nutrition, Food Chemistry Secondary Metabolites in the Control of Microbiota and Immunity: Functional Sugars Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    This session will provide background on glycoscience and the role of glyco structures in cell-cell communication, also involved in the cross-kingdom communication system to develop i.e., a potentially mutualistic, commensalistic or parasitic interaction. The innate immune system in mammals is an older evolutionary defense strategy, relatively speaking, and also it is the dominant immune system response found in plants, fungi, insects, and primitive multicellular eukaryote organisms.  Therefore, it is not surprising to have analog immune responses to secondary metabolites of plants, stimulating our innate immune cells. Research is revealing the molecular mechanism and the role of some dietary functional sugars in potentially improving the cellular communication with the gut microbiota. Advances in research is creating novel marketing opportunities for gut health, to potentially prevent the large number of specific health challenges arising from microbiota imbalance.
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    Awards & Competitions, Student IFTSA Undergraduate Research Competition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 356-357
    Six undergraduate finalists will present their original research projects both orally and via poster, vying for first, second, and third place recognition in New Orleans. Winners will be announced at Tuesday’s IFTSA Closing Ceremony.
  • -
    NOLA Brewing Company NOLA Brewing Company
    Take a guided tour of NOLA Brewing Company by one of their most experienced brewers. Attendees will be given a history of the brewery and how they got started. They’ll learn how beer is made on the production floor and be given a technical override on exactly what is going on in each step of the manufacturing process.  They’ll discover the types of yeast used, why hops are incorporated into the mix, specs of equipment and the shelf life issues of beer. Plus, they’ll also learn about the canning operation and why they use cans. After the tour guest are invited to a tasting. Tour includes substantial walking, standing and one flight of stairs. Must be 21 to attend this tour.  Non-slip closed toe shoes are required. Facilities reserve the right to review registration lists and deny participation to individuals they deem as having a conflict of interest. Participants may be required to sign a confidentiality agreement.

    Shuttle to NOLA Breweing Company in included and will leave from the Ernest N. Morial Convnention Center at 1:30pm.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event ($54/person) and are required to be purchased prior to the event. Click here to register for this event!
  • -
    Professional Development Bringing Your Authentic Self to Work IFT Central Booth
    What happens when your drive to “be yourself” also competes with not wanting to stand out or be different from others? Studies show that humans have a desire to be authentic and can lead to higher rates of satisfaction and well-being. Learn how encouraging a sense of  inclusion on a broader scale can benefit you and your organization.
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 1:40pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Food Health & Nutrition, Food Chemistry Parallels Among the Microbial Diversity in Fermented Vegetables and the Human Gut and Potential Applications in Food and Beverage Products Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    This session will provide background on glycoscience and the role of glyco structures in cell-cell communication, also involved in the cross-kingdom communication system to develop i.e., a potentially mutualistic, commensalistic or parasitic interaction. The innate immune system in mammals is an older evolutionary defense strategy, relatively speaking, and also it is the dominant immune system response found in plants, fungi, insects, and primitive multicellular eukaryote organisms.  Therefore, it is not surprising to have analog immune responses to secondary metabolites of plants, stimulating our innate immune cells. Research is revealing the molecular mechanism and the role of some dietary functional sugars in potentially improving the cellular communication with the gut microbiota. Advances in research is creating novel marketing opportunities for gut health, to potentially prevent the large number of specific health challenges arising from microbiota imbalance.
  • -
    Emerging Data Tools and Predicting Future Trends in the Food Industry Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    It's not enough to know which consumer trends are impacting the food industry today, you need to know what trends are coming that haven’t bubbled to the surface of the marketplace yet. This panel discussion will explore how predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and other data tools are being leveraged to forecast trends into the future. It’s not enough to know which consumer trends are impacting the food industry today, you need to know what trends are coming that haven’t bubbled to the surface of the marketplace yet. This panel discussion will explore how predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and other data tools are being leveraged to forecast trends into the future.
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 2pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 2:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Food Health & Nutrition Planting the Microbiome: The Impact of Plant-Derived Exosome-Like Nanoparticles on the Gut Microbiome and Intestinal Homeostasis Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    Ingestion by distinct gut microbes of exosome-like nanoparticles containing bioactive components can result in differential microbial gene expression that can contribute to host health.  This interkingdom communication between plant, microbe and host provides compelling approaches toward the development of precision tools aimed at health-directed dietary interventions for consumers.
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 2:40pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Poster Session 2 - Education, Extension, & Outreach; Food Laws & Regulations; Food Microbiology; Marketing, Sales, & Management; Quality Assurance; Sensory & Consumer Sciences; Toxicology & Safety Evaluations Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Hall J
  • -
    Food Health & Nutrition The Gut Microbiome and Personalization of Diet and Health Interventions Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    In this session recent advances in linking the gut microbiome to personalized dietary recommendations will be examined. With the rise of uBiome and other gut microbial sequencing companies, consumers want to know what they can do with this data. Unfortunately, much as with human genomic sequencing the applications have trailed behind the data availability. While gut microbial composition has been correlated with a large number of disease states, the causal chain (did the microbes cause the disease or did the disease favor those microbes?) has yet to be established in most cases. However, the link between diet and our gut microbiome is much more direct although somewhat bidirectional, with diet influencing the microbial composition and microbial metabolism influencing human health. It is clear that diet quite readily alters the relative abundances of the various microorganisms in the gut, but it appears to be much more difficult to change membership, the strains of bacteria that are present. At present it appears we can only incrementally change the microbiome that established itself in our guts soon after weaning. From this springs the idea that we can customize our diets to take maximal advantage of the bacteria that are already present in our intestinal tracts. They can produce a number of health altering compounds such as the short chain fatty acids, compounds that are important modulators of the immune system and metabolism. This session will examine efforts to identify signatures in the microbiota that indicate when a particular food or food component will be more or less beneficial. Does this mean that every microbiome needs to be treated as unique? Perhaps, however, efforts have been made to find relevant differences based on gender, geography, age, weight status and others. Furthermore, there is the somewhat controversial idea that people can be divided into a small number of ‘enterotypes’ that represent functionally and phylogenetically distinct types of microbiomes. The goal is that attendees will come away with a sense of where this relatively nascent field is going and its implications for food and ingredient producers.
  • -
    IFTNEXT Engineers for Change: Insights from Fellowship Research in Sub-Saharan Africa Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Learn how Feeding Tomorrow, the Foundation of IFT, are collaborating with several not-for-profit organizations to set up volunteer programs that leverage technical knowledge, in this case through Engineering graduate students to provide scalable, sustainable, safe and nutritious food technology solutions for people and regions in need. 
  • -
    ePoster Session 12: Fruit & Vegetable Products Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
  • -
    ePoster Session 9: Food Microbiology Part 2 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
  • -
    ePoster Session 7: Food Laws & Regulations, Food Microbiology, Sensory & Consumer Sciences, and Quality Assurance Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
  • -
    ePoster Session 11: Protein Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
  • -
    ePoster Session 10: Toxicology & Safety Evaluation, Protein, and Fruit & Vegetable Products Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
  • -
    ePoster Session 8: Food Microbiology Part 1 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 3pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Student, Awards & Competitions Smart Snacks for Kids Product Development Competition - Oral Presentation Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 343-345
    The IFTSA Smart Snacks for Kids Competition challenges students to develop a fun and nutritious food or beverage product targeted at kids and/or teens. Teams are empowered to use their imagination in order to engage their chosen audience in the science and overall appeal behind a novel product of their creation. A crucial component of a winning product is the team’s ability to relay the food or beverage’s ”smart” qualities to both a technical AND a general audience. Winners will be announced during the IFTSA Closing Ceremony.
  • -
    Professional Development Expectations vs Reality: Working in the Food Industry IFT Central Booth
    New graduates and early careerists often envision a rewarding career in the food industry. Oftentimes this is the case but not without some “reality checks.” Come and join a panel of food industry experts to find out what you should expect working in the Food Industry.
  • -
    Sustainability Eyes on Agriculture: Sustainability Includes Action from Suppliers to Consumers Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Traceability Stage
    More consumers are caring about sustainability at the farm level. The origin of food ingredients and their sustainability are stepping into the spotlight, especially as consumers care more about transparency. As consumers are interested in claims related to farmer welfare, soil health and regenerative agriculture, ingredient companies will have to share more information with manufacturers.
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Mon, 3:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Sustainability, Food Processing & Packaging Food Loss and Waste Minimization in Fruit and Vegetable Chains: Global Perspectives and Opportunities for Transformation Into High Value Products and Ingredients Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392
    It is estimated that the world wastes about 1.6 gigatons of food, where 1.3 gigatons represents the edible portion of the food lost, which could otherwise be recovered and diverted into high value products. In horticulture, this translates into global economic losses of at least $320 billion, as reported by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization. The fruit and vegetable chains undergo 10-60% losses before retail, depending on the country and region, while consumer losses can scale up to a wastage of 60% of the food consumed in industrialized countries. This symposium will provide a selection of the work carried out around the world to minimize food losses through diversion and value addition across horticultural chains.
     
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    Food Processing & Packaging The Plant-Based Meat Revolution: Developing and Characterizing the Next Generation of Products Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390
    Plant-based meat has evolved over the last couple of decades. Consumer expectations and awareness of the environmental impacts of meat production have driven the development of alternatives for regular meat.
     
    These new types of meat made from plant ingredients are a growing market segment. According to Nielsen data commissioned by the Plant Based Foods Association, over the past year retail sales of plant-based meat grew 24% while animal meat retail sales grew 2% during the same time period. One of the explanations for this trend is the continued effort from all contributors in this sector to revolutionize meat consumption and develop products that appeal to a wide range of consumers. These products must provide sustainability and health benefits, new flavor discovery, and be tasty and affordable.
     
    Lots of research has been conducted to improve the process from crop production to fibrous and juicy plant-based meat. However, in order to continue the growth trend in the plant-based meat sector and create the next generation of plant-based meat products, numerous R&D opportunities remain.
     
    This symposium will highlight the latest developments in the production of plant-based meat, from raw material characterization to ingredient processing to high-moisture extrusion cooking and post-extrusion product development. It will also summarize some of the knowledge gaps and technical barriers that still need to be addressed.
     
    First, we will introduce plant-based meat, discuss current consumer trends and market opportunities, and create the context for understanding the subsequent talks. We will outline opportunities in plant-based meat, such as the need to address production and scaling bottlenecks, that will be necessary for accelerating the plant-based meat industry.
     
    Then we will focus on the raw materials and how the technology of fractionation – including wet processing methods – can be used to extract protein and starch from crops to turn plants into functional ingredients for use in high moisture extrusion.
     
    Next we will explore the latest developments in high moisture extrusion to produce plant-based meats. We will show data comparing the texture of extruded plant-based meat to animal meat and discuss possible avenues for controlling and improving the extrusion process to create better texture for plant-based meat.
     
    Finally, to complete this symposium, we will present product development strategies to overcome the technical obstacles when working with plant-based proteins in extruded food products. Together, the presentations in this symposium will help attendees understand the processing and food technology that lead to fibrous, juicy, tasty plant-based meat. Continued, collaborative efforts to develop and characterize the next generation of plant-based meat products promise a plant-based meat revolution with positive outcomes and opportunities.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Alternative Proteins for Optimal Human Health: Science, Development, Sensory, and Regulations Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-387
    The market for and development of proteins from novel sources is expanding rapidly every day to meet a growing consumer demand for a wide variety of different uses. As consumers seek more options and versatility in products it is critically important to understand how these proteins can be fit for purpose. Identifying and developing these novel sources of proteins as food ingredients to meet consumer demand creates a host of challenges for industry, including the analytical challenge of determining the quality of the protein provided. Ensuring that taste and texture are not negatively affected is paramount to the success of a product and a thorough understanding of the challenges and solutions for product formulation is critical. Consumer safety is not negotiable. A determination that these proteins from novel sources are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) requires development and public disclosure of appropriate data to confirm safety. All of these topics will be explored in depth to provide the attendee of the session with an understanding of the safety and functionality of novel protein sources in our foods.
     
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    Public Policy, Food Laws & Regulations, Food Safety & Defense Product Recalls: What Have We Learned and How Can We Prevent the Next One From Occurring? Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 48 million people in the United States become ill each year from foodborne pathogens, causing 128,000 hospitalizations and 3000 deaths. Norovirus caused the most illnesses; nontyphoidal Salmonella spp., norovirus, Campylobacter spp., and T. gondii caused the most hospitalizations; and nontyphoidal Salmonella spp. , T. gondii, L. monocytogenes, and norovirus caused the most deaths. The number of the foodborne outbreaks linked to the consumption of fresh produce and meat has also increased. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is focused on shifting the nation’s food safety system from responding to illness to preventing it. FDA has finalized seven major rules to implement FSMA and to ensure the safety of the food supply in the global supply chain. This session covers emerging pathogens in food safety, and efforts by industry and regulatory agencies to safeguard food supply to US consumers.
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    3D Food Printing: State of the Art, Future Prospects, and Consumer Acceptance Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    Personalization and consumer empowerment are important drivers in developing 3D food printing technologies for local on-demand, flexible food production. Furthermore, the digitalization of the food manufacturing chain is a strong technological driver. However, the potential of 3D food printing technology has not yet been fully realized within the agri-food industry. In this session, we will present the current state of the art of 3D food printing in terms of advances in 3D food printing equipment, processes, and application. Each separate talk will focus on developments on 3D printing technologies, advances in food material properties for 3D food printing, and consumer acceptance of 3D food printed products from leading 3D food printing research institutes and pioneering companies. This session will be valuable for food manufacturers, product developers, ingredient suppliers, and consumer groups who are interested in the application of 3D printing technologies within the food industry. Furthermore, this session will provide insight on 3D food printing as a growing novel field of study within the food sciences.
     
    There have been tremendous improvements in the technology used for 3D food printing in the last five years. In the first talk, advances in 3D food printing equipment across different platforms such as fused deposition modeling (FDM), selective laser sintering (SLS), and powderbed printing (PBP) will be described along with their applications and future prospects for use within the food industry. Furthermore, food applications of various 3D printing equipment will be detailed by giving a wide array of examples where 3D food printing has served a distinct advantage over traditional food processing operations. 
     
    In the second talk, important food material requirements for each technology will be detailed. Fused deposition modeling (FDM), selective laser sintering (SLS), and powder bed printing (PBP) each require different material properties. In addition, product concepts that can be achieved using 3D printing technologies will be outlined. The use of 3D printing technology to provide unique shapes will be discussed. More importantly, the possibilities for engineering novel food structures and textures will be highlighted.
     
    In the third presentation, a manufacturer of whey proteins will review the research work performed with whey protein isolates (WPI) in combination with other ingredients and their functionality in 3D printing models. The speaker will discuss the challenges in protein functionality and their adaptability to 3D printing.
     
    Finally, the application of 3D food printing for military field feeding and customizing nutrition for the soldier continues to be explored. Soldiers’ acceptance of food items produced by 3D printing technology will be necessary for inclusion of printed ration components into the current military field feeding platform. Moreover, the printability of a formulation affects the functionality of the printed product and its structural stability over time. This presentation will discuss using model food systems to optimize formulation composition, flow properties, and printability. This data will aid in the development of nutritionally customize ration components to optimize soldier performance.
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    Food Chemistry, Food Health & Nutrition An Updated View of Pectin Interactions and Functionality Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385
    Pectin is one of the most complex and major plant cell wall components in nature. The structure of pectin has been studied for many years, showing as many as 17 different monosaccharides and more than 20 linkages. The large variation and the complexity of the structure result in major variation in the functionality of this polysaccharide, both in products where it is one of the natural components, such as fruits and vegetables (raw and processed), and in the numerous products where it is added as a gelling, stabilizing, or thickening agent. The structure of pectin allows interactions with many other macro and small molecules in our food. Such interactions are affected by the origin of the pectin (that affects the structure) and by the external parameters such as processing. It is known that food component interactions might significantly affect the stability of some compounds and the nutritional and functional properties of the product. The aim of the suggested symposium is to present the most recent evidence regarding the different interactions of pectin with other food components and how it can affect the functional properties of the food.
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    Food Safety & Defense Cannabis Edibles: Addressing the Challenges of a Global Food Trend Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285
    With the legalization of cannabinoids (especially THC and CBD), and with the many consumers seeking alternatives to smoking, infused food and drinks are fast becoming a preferred delivery mechanism for consumers. An explosion of new business opportunities is bringing many who are not grounded in food science into the food/drink space. Regulatory systems for cannabis-infused consumables, and thus legal guidance, are still evolving; often governed by region, they lack harmonization across jurisdictions and alignment with established food safety protocols.
     
    Combining these difficulties with the plethora of non-scientific information and perspectives about cannabis consumable products creates specific concerns, many of which are directly related to product and consumer safety: food fraud, supply chain integrity, quality control, commonly accepted test methods, homogeneity of finished foods, and product identification and labeling. All of these flow from the fact that cannabis consumables combine drugs with food in a way unlike any previous products.
     
    This discussion will introduce important background about the specific development challenges faced by cannabis-infused edibles producers and will review practical solutions from the perspective of three popular food platforms: confections, beverages, and baked goods. It will present methods and technologies that address unique product development challenges of cannabinoids: food fraud, foodborne diseases, dosage control and verification, and product homogeneity and consistency.
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    Food Safety & Defense Safety Assessment: Confidence in Your Ingredients From Nature to Table Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    Consumers are re-evaluating the complete life cycle of both standard and new food ingredients and food products, from the production of the raw agricultural ingredients, through processing and final product packaging. Consumers are wanting more transparency in the process, as well as a reduction in preservatives, excipients and artificial ingredients. The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is helping to streamline and document multiple aspects of food production, and is potentially increasing food processing transparency, including the potential incorporation of blockchain technology in food production. Meeting FSMA requirements entails a re-evaluation of analytical methodology as well as the overall determination of the safety of both the ingredients and the final product. The symposium focuses on safety assessments of (new) food ingredients, by-products of other food products/production, products/by-products of fermentation processes, necessary analytical methodology modifications, and the potential impact of FSMA on the production processes and use of new ingredients.
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    Food Processing & Packaging, Food Engineering Twenty Years of Advancements in Nonthermal Processing Technologies: Guiding Factors and a Look to the Future, Part II Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    This two-part symposium will cover twenty years of progress in building a sound base of research and engineering to establish several key novel food processes using different efficient modes of energy to improve quality, safety, and shelf life of a variety of foods to meet demands of the 21st century consumer. The Nonthermal Processing Division, which was established in 1999, provided a platform for collaborative multidisciplinary research and development activities that defined pathways for commercialization of advanced food technologies in many countries around the world. Part one of this symposium will focus on the strategies used to guide research and development efforts to guide movement of technologies up the ladders from bench scale research to pilot plant demonstrations of real products and then the scale-up to industrial production. One key role of the Division was to provide a focus for collaborative efforts that involved academic, industrial and government scientists and engineers, from several disciplines and many countries, to facilitate effective technology transfer to put improved minimally processed foods in the hands of consumers around the world. Several leaders of the Division’s efforts will provide summary presentations and there will be a panel of experts at the end of part two to stimulate a discussion with the audience of prospects for future developments in this growing segment of the international food industry. This symposium is proposed in honor of the 20th Anniversary of the Founding of the Nonthermal Processing Division.
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    Natural Colors: Opportunities for Innovation Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    Color is often the first characteristic that influences the purchasing decision, especially for new products. Colored foods and beverages are often more appealing visually and directly impact the perception of quality and overall experience. With the recent trend of consumers looking for foods with “clean labels,” the market demand for “natural” colors is increasing. Several case studies of brands that have converted to natural colors have shown that many consumers are willing to pay more for a more natural product.
     
    However, global regulatory agencies do not have a harmonized viewpoint as to the definition of "natural" color additives nor their approval and use requirements. Failure to be aware of the disparate regulatory requirements can lead to compliance and labeling challenges. Additionally, color manufacturers have been engaging in innovative research and product development to meet this market demand, resulting in new natural color opportunities as well as the identification of limitations, although many commonly stated challenges are misperceptions.
     
    This panel session brings together food color experts to share their experiences and perspectives on the impact of regulations on natural color innovation.
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    Food Health & Nutrition, Public Policy, Food Laws & Regulations The Patent Landscape: The Gut Microbiome Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    Patent activity in the food and beverage field is booming. This team will share its view of attempts to patent in the field of the gut microbiome (i.e. food, nutrition, diet, health), and what that means for you from a business and strategy perspective. We’ll explore the state of the art of the gut microbiome through the lens of patent activity. We’ll highlight major technologies, companies, and inventors. The patent landscape process may help you to identify research and business trends, potential research partners and collaborators, acquisition targets, and competitive threats. This patent landscape may also explore the use of human gut microbiome for therapeutic application in area of gastrointestinal diseases. Microbiome-based therapeutic approaches may be reviewed, including fecal transplants and selected novel therapies.
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    Professional Development IFTSA Graduate Research Video Competition: Sponsored by Campden BRI IFT Central Booth
    In this competition, developed in partnership with Campden BRI, graduate students submitted videos of three minutes or less describing their research in a fun and engaging way. The winner of the competition will receive a 10-day trip to visit Campden BRI in the United Kingdom and gain insight into the European food and drink industry. Join this session to see each of the finalist videos and ask questions of the finalists. The winner will be announced at Tuesday’s IFTSA Closing Ceremony.
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    IFTNEXT Overcoming Clean Label Challenges in the New Trust Economy Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Trust. Influence. Reputation. Accountability. Consumers are demanding more transparency in every aspect of their lives—especially in what they and their families eat. Join us for an engaging, interactive session with a TED talk style dive into this free-from movement where 1 in 4 consumers demand a clean label in over half of the foods they buy. Learn why perception is reality, driven by the new trust economy where likes on social media signal trust more than marketing content from large corporations or scientific “facts” from academia or the government. Backed by 30,000 responses from US primary shoppers and a database of hundreds of thousands of behavioral measures from a community of “Clean Label Enthusiasts™,” we will offer six recommendations for how to overcome the clean label challenge for market success.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Communicating Microbiome Science Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    Presentations followed by a panel discussion on communicating the science of the microbiome.
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    Networking & Social CFS Networking Reception Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 240-241
    Champagne networking reception for Certified Food Science credential-holders. New certificants will be recognized and receive their CFS lapel pins.
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    Networking & Social IFT Experts & Media Happy Hour (Invitation Only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 242
    Invitation Only Event - An opportunity for IFT's Food Science Communicators to join a group of select media guests for an informal reception where they can meet and socialize.
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    Networking & Social University of Illinois Reception New Orleans Marriott - Gallerie 2 (2nd floor)
    Reception for alumni, faculty, students and supporters of the University of Illinois.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $25/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social UMass Alumni Update Mulates (201 Julia Street, New Orleans, LA)
    The Alumni event is an opportunity to see old friends and make new ones. An update on happenings at UMass Food Science will be given.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Purdue Indiana Networking Event New Orleans Marriott - Salon H (3rd floor)
    Purdue University Food Science and Indiana Section IFT Networking Event.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $35/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Michigan State University Food Science Human Nutrition Alumni Reception New Orleans Marriott - Gallerie 6 (2nd floor)
    Please come and join us at the Michigan State University Food Science and Human Nutrition Alumni Reception! Go Green!!

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $10/person
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social University of Minnesota Alumni & Friends Meet New Orleans Marriott - Studio 6 (2nd floor)
    Evening reception with finger foods and drinks for university's alumni and friends.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $30/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Oregon State University & Oregon Section IFT Mixer Cane & Table, 1113 Decatur St, French Quarter
    Prototiki? Yes! No better way to catch up with old friends, classmates and colleagues than being treated to appetizers and tropical drinks in this cool French Quarter locale that is reinventing the Tiki bar!  We hope to see you, our alumni and Oregon industry professionals, at this festive reunion.
    Learn more about Prototiki at Cane & Table https://vimeo.com/128873727
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    Networking & Social ELN Celebration Reception (Invitation Only) New Orleans Marriott - Salon E (3rd floor)
    Invitation Only: All Emerging Leader Network 2019 Participants and alumni are invited to celebrate and reunite.
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    Networking & Social Reviewers Reception (by invite only) New Orleans Marriott - Balconies J-K (4th floor)
    IFT Journals reception for active reviewers of JFS, CRFSFS, and JFSE, by invitation only.
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    Networking & Social Chinese American Food Society (CAFS) Annual Banquet Panda King Restaurant (925 Behrman Hwy, New Orleans, LA)
    Annual banquet for CAFS members to network.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance. $35/person
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Cornell Food Science Reception New Orleans Marriott - Gallerie 4 (2nd floor)
    An evening of food and fun for Cornell Food Science Alumni, Students, Faculty, Stakeholders, and Friends.
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    Networking & Social Muscle Foods Division Event Crescent City Brewhouse (527 Decatur St, New Orleans, LA)
    Indulge in the carving station and enjoy one drink ticket at the Muscle Foods Division Social Event! And be sure not to miss out on great raffle prizes!
    Heavy appetizers and two drink tickets included with ticket purchase. So get a mooooooooove on and purchase your ticket today!
    Appetizers will be served and two drink tickets are included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Nonthermal Processing, Food Packaging & Food Engineering, and Education, Extension & Outreach Division Joint Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Salon D (3rd floor)
    Join us for a three-Division collaboration!
    6:00-6:30 pm Networking
    6:30-7:15 pm Formal program
    7:15-8:00 pm Networking
    Appetizers will be served and beer/wine/soda is included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Dairy Foods Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Gallerie 1 (2nd floor)
    Catch up with IFT's Dairy Foods Division!
    Light appetizers and open bar included with your ticket purchase.
    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Biotechnology, Microbiology, Fruit and Vegetable Division Joint Event New Orleans Marriott - Gallerie 3 (2nd floor)
    Join us for our annual three-Division collaboration! Sip drinks at the open bar, enjoy appetizers, and network!  Light appetizers and one drink ticket included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Carbohydrate Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Studio 8 (2nd floor)
    Catch up with IFT's Carbohydrate Division!
    Light appetizers and open bar included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Aquatic Food Products Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Studio 4 (3rd floor)
    Join the Aquatic Food Products Division for an evening of food and drink. Light appetizers and open bar included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social 2019 KAFTA (Korean American Food Technologists Association) Annual Meeting The Crystal Palace (10020 Chef Menteur Highway, New Orleans, LA)
    Free for KAFTA members and visitors that interested in KAFTA annual meeting. Please feel free to bring all of your colleagues, friends, and students.
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    Networking & Social Ohio State Friends & Alumni Networking Event New Orleans Marriott - Salon D (3rd floor)
    This networking event is open to all friends and alumni of The Ohio State University. Please join us for a chance to reconnect with familiar faces and strengthen your food industry network.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $50/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Food Chemistry Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Studio 3 (2nd floor)
    Catch up with IFT's Food Chemistry Division!
    Light appetizers and beer/wine/soda included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
     
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    Networking & Social University of Georgia Food Science and Technology Alumni and Friends Networking Vessel NOLA (3835 Iberville St., New Orleans, LA)
    The University of Georgia Food Science and Technology wants to see you at IFT19! Come and join us for a reception and time to network with alumni and friends.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $25/person.
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social International Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Salon A-B (3rd floor)
    Join the International Division for a fabulous evening of conversation and cocktails during IFT19. Enjoy catching up with friends from around the world.
    Appetizers will be served and beer/wine/soda is included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Protein Division Event New Orleans Marriott - Salon H (3rd floor)
    Join IFT's Protein Division for our first evening social. Converse and share best practices over drinks and appetizers.
    Light appetizers and beer/wine/soda included with your ticket purchase.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $30, Student - $10
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social New Professionals Mixer New Orleans Marriott - Salon E (3rd floor)
    The IFT New Professionals Work Group welcomes all IFT19 attendees who have been in their career for ten years or less to meet and mingle.
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    Student, Networking & Social IFTSA Student Lounge Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 353-355
    To meet up with students, visit the Student Lounge, sponsored by PepsiCo. Be sure to stop by and pick up your student events brochure, OFG, and PepsiCo swag! Representatives from PepsiCo will be on hand, during specific times, to talk about all of the internship and full-time opportunities available with PepsiCo.
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    International Lounge Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 278-280
    Members and non-members of the International Division are welcome to meet and network in the International Lounge throughout the event to discuss international topics facing the science of food.
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    Networking & Social Organics and Naturals Buyer's Breakfast Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 255-257

    Companies with organic products looking for a more intimate setting to share your products with a group of high impact buyers should take advantage of our hosted Organics and Naturals Buyer's Breakfast, sponsored by Ardent Mills, on Tuesday, June 4. This special event provides a limited group of organics suppliers an exclusive opportunity to share product information, not to mention engage and network with new, high-qualified customers.

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    IFTNEXT IFTNEXT Food Disruption Challenge™ LIVE Pitch Competition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    This exciting live pitch competition will highlight the work of innovative, food-focused entrepreneurs. Designed as a fast-paced pitch event, the IFTNEXT Food Disruption Challenge™ will feature a select group of start-ups competing for a $25,000 cash prize. Audience members will also cast their vote to award a $5,000 People’s Choice Award. Finalists are chosen to share their innovations representing breakthrough solutions across food ingredient, packaging, agriculture, and processing applications.
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    Big Easy Bucha Big Easy Bucha
    Launched in 2014, Big Easy Bucha is New Orleans' original artisanal, probiotic-packed kombucha. Kombucha, or fermented tea, is naturally raw, vegan and healthful. Tour the Big Easy Bucha manufacturing facility and learn the various facets of kombucha brewing. Guests will also learn the basics of fermentation and how the tea is transferred and packaged. This tour will include substantial walking and standing.  Hairnets, gloves and closed toe shoes are required. Non-slip closed toe shoes are required. Facilities reserve the right to review registration lists and deny participation to individuals they deem as having a conflict of interest. Participants may be required to sign a confidentiality agreement.

    Shuttle to Big Easy Bucha is included and will leave from the Ernest N. Morial Convnention Center at 9:30am.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event ($34/person) and are required to be purchased prior to the event. Click here to register for this event!
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    IFTNEXT Start-Up Alley Showcase Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Get to know the the companies featured at IFT19's Start-Up Alley.
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    FoodLogiQ: "Tick Tock, Time's Up: The Immediate Benefits of Traceability Technology During a Food Recall" Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Traceability Stage
    Your company has experienced a food recall, and the clock is ticking. Do you have the information you need to locate the affected product?  Can you ensure that product is pulled, stakeholders are notified, and consumers are protected in a quick and efficient manner? Join FoodLogiQ for an interactive demo of Track+Trace, our food traceability software that stitches together the critical tracking events of your products and ingredients at the batch-lot level.  Learn how our technology solution can help you:
    • Achieve true end-to-end traceability from grower to distribution center to retailer or restaurant;
    • Have real-time visualization of your entire supply chain, beyond the industry standard of 'one-up-one-back;'
    • Run a comprehensive investigation of your entire supply chain and identify the root cause of a food safety issue;
    • Launch a withdrawal to get non-conforming product out of your supply chain;
    • Inspire confidence in your products and give consumers the transparency they deserve
     
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    Food Safety & Defense, Food Chemistry Food Fraud Prevention: How Food Standards Complement Information Databases and Vulnerability Assessments Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390
    The impact of fraud on the food industry is not just the huge economic loss, but also negative effects on public confidence in food producers and regulators, and the risk of serious public health consequences. Incidents of food fraud are happening at a rate that increases consumers’ mistrust in the food industry. Consumers are now concerned about what they eat from the perspective of nutrition, quality, safety, and authenticity, and all of these attributes are related. They are going to great lengths and even changing their dietary habits to include foods (and supplements) thought to prevent disease and increase overall health. Consumers feel cheated after finding that foods are not accurately and appropriately labeled. Food safety programs also rely on the fact that the foods or ingredients are appropriately labeled. We know that information about potential adulterants and a structured approach to assessing vulnerability are important to food fraud prevention. However, food standards can also be a powerful tool to both agree on a standardized definition of “authentic” foods and to ensure authenticity and safety in the market. This symposium session will first introduce the latest information on foods susceptible to fraud, along with an update on database and vulnerability assessment tools for the prevention of food fraud. Then we will introduce current food standards and discuss the implementation of these standards to help mitigate supply chain risks. Case studies on protein ingredients, olive oil, and pomegranate juice will be presented. Finally, the latest analytical techniques and schemes applicable to food fraud prevention will be discussed using real-life examples.
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    Sensory Science What Does Clean Mean? Overcoming the Challenge of GMOs and Other Ingredient Avoidances Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392
    The free-from food movement has had far reaching impact throughout the food industry. Retailers, food manufacturers, ingredient suppliers, and government regulators have all felt the impact of this movement. The market impact stems from consumers seeking trust and transparency in the brands they buy, and labels listing ingredients that are perceived as "clean," i.e. nothing "chemical" or "artificial." GMO perceptions by consumers have had the greatest impact on all parts of the food industry supply chain. The construct of “GMO-Free” in the minds of consumers is ill defined, often standing for a general claim of source transparency. The definition of a “GMO” in the minds of consumers does not align with the science. Yet, irrespective of the science underlying food safety and what ingredients are listed as GRAS, these consumer perceptions are real and important for food scientists to understand to be successful in the design and manufacture of products for the marketplace.

    To overcome these challenges, food scientists are seeking answers to questions ranging from when is a clean label important, how to design products to achieve a cleaner label, and how to source ingredients that are perceived to contribute to a clean label. 

    To address these questions, this session will include presentations by a diverse set of experts in consumer and sensory science, ingredient sourcing and redesign, and product design and development. Pioneering insights into ingredient perceptions from consumer research will be presented. This will provide the basis for forward thinking views by the flavor industry into how to redesign flavors and ingredients to address consumer concerns. We will hear from a research chef specializing in clean label food product redesign. Last, we will hear from a leading industry consultant about how plant-based products and sourced ingredients are changing the conversation about what is clean.

    The session will conclude with a moderated panel discussion involving questions and comments from the audience. The scientific session will help product developers, sensory and consumer scientists, and food marketers gain new insights into how consumers are defining products as clean, what are the tradeoffs they will make in context of different use moments, and how trust and transparency factor into the brands they will consider. The session will also provide practical knowledge for when is it necessary to design products as having a clean label, how to design products to achieve a cleaner label, and how to source ingredients that are perceived to contribute to a clean label.
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    Sensory Science Sensory/Consumer Data and Unmet Expectations: The Mother of All Frustration Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385
    Frequently, perceptual data being reported by the sensory professional do not align with the expectations of the customer (internal and/or external). For example, a customer may be reformulating a product as an improvement over the current, but the consumer data do not align to support that conclusion. Or, a customer is planning to sell their product with a message of “sweeter than the competition”, but the trained panel data do not align to support that statement. In such cases, the burden of explanation lies squarely on the sensory professional and can result in challenging situations because a certain outcome was expected, or planned. When this happens business deliverables, such as go-to-market materials or timelines, may be impacted. Why do these situations happen? Can these scenarios be prevented? This symposium seeks to explore these questions as they relate to discrimination, descriptive, and consumer testing data. Each presenter will focus on a different research methodology and share situations where the results did not come out as expected and thereby impacted business decisions. They will explain what occurred, what could have been done differently, and share how the situation was managed with the business team or customer. The session will be moderated by LaKendra Shepard, Principal Technologist at Ingredion Incorporated. Speakers will be: Sola Ojeh, Director of Global Sensory at Sensient Flavors (discrimination testing), Dulce Paredes, Vice President of Global Consumer Insight & Market Research at Takasago International (consumer testing), Sharon Bender, Business Sensory Scientist at Ingredion Incorporated (descriptive testing), and Karen Graves, Director of Sensory at Bell Flavors & Fragrances (linking consumer and descriptive testing methods).
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    Sustainability Technological Advances and New Insights Into the Emerging Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients Industry From Farm to Table Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    As the human population grows, it is ever more important to sustain rather than increase levels of consumption from earth and its ecosphere. Current sources of protein are unsustainable. Already 70% of agricultural land, 30% of the land on earth, is used for livestock. Diversification of our food supply is critical for food security. The good news is that farm raised insects, such as crickets, mealworms and others, hold promise as a sustainable solution. They utilize less energy, feed, land and water than other livestock and contribute less to climate change and pollution. They are gaining already momentum as a food ingredient. Since about 2011, over 50 companies in North America and 80 in Europe offer food products with insects as a key ingredient. This symposium will highlight the latest in cutting edge research and the state of the new industry developing insects as sustainable food ingredients and a class of new commodities for the food industry (protein isolates and extracts, whole insect based ingredients such as cricket powder, oil, fiber, and bioactives etc.). Our learning objectives for this symposium will be: (1) highlighting late breaking cutting edge research and technology in insect farming, genetics, genomics, processing, functionality evaluation, and product development and (2) understanding the functionality of insect based food ingredients, the benefits of these ingredients, and how they can be used in the food industry.
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    Food Processing & Packaging, Food Health & Nutrition NOVA: Clearing Up the Confusion About Processed Food and Health Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285
    Nearly a decade ago, the NOVA movement questioned the public and personal health value of processed foods. Advocating processed foods into four categories, consumers not only questioned the value of processed foods, they contend that these categorized foods contribute to chronic non-communicable diseases, and even cancer. In fact, NOVA advocates state that such foods are not a solution, but actually contribute to unhealthful dietary patterns that lead to poor health. On the other hand, counterarguments indicate that such foods enhance food quality, remove potential innate toxins, and improve nutrient bioavailability. The proposed session will embark on presenting arguments within this controversy, while engaging the audience to consider the dynamics of food processing and health outcomes.
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    Food Health & Nutrition, Food Engineering Recent Advances Regarding Human Milk Oligoscaharides and Their Role in Human Nutrition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    Human breast milk contains a group of unconjugated complex carbohydrates that are synthesized from lactose in the mammary glands, and constitute the third-most abundant component of human milk after lactose and lipids. These carbohydrates, known as the human milk oligosaccharies (HMOs), are not digested in the infant gastrointestinal tract and reach the colon intact or are absorbed in small quantities. Research studies during the past several years have suggested that HMOs could potentially affect the infant immunity by binding to the cell surface receptors and altering the host epithelial and immune cell responses in the infant gut.
     
    This session, jointly organized by IFT Dairy and Carbohydrates Divisions, will focus on the role of HMOs in infant and adult nutrition. The presenters will share some of the latest advances in understanding of human milk components with specific focus on HMOs and bioactive proteins, and how these advances could be leveraged to further improve infant formulations. The session will include a presentation on the factors that influence the utilization of HMOs in the infant’s gut such as lactation duration and infant age. Since the mechanism of action of HMOs has potential relevance to adult populations, recent findings related to infection resistance and immune enhancement in adults, as well as appropriate research models, will be discussed. Also, recent scientific advances and challenges in analytical method development for different components of HMOs addressing the complexity of their isolation and measurements in different product matrices will be presented. 
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    Food Processing & Packaging Shaking It Up: How to Improve Quality and Marketability of Shelf Stable Foods Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-386
    Thermally processed foods attract customers because they are convenient. The result is a $134 billion industry in the United States each year. Traditionally, the canning industry uses still retorts, where product is heated without agitation for long periods, resulting in an inferior texture quality compared to fresh or frozen products. Availability of batch-agitating retorts involving vigorous agitation of product in containers presents an opportunity for decreased process times, which will allow for the creation of shelf stable products of higher quality. Batch agitating retorts provide batch and container flexibility with the possibility to apply several combinations of time/temperature/agitating cycles. In addition, the use of flexible containers has the advantage of shelf stability, lower package weight, reduction of storage space, ease of opening and preparation, and reduced heat exposure, resulting in improved quality and, eventually, packaging economy.

    Batch agitating retort technology has been available for a while, and it is known that it reduces processing time and eliminates cold spots. Currently, researchers and industry are working together to optimize quality in seafood and plant based products to resemble frozen product quality and decrease process times. The technology used for these studies is an oscillating process that is a newer processing mode that moves the product from side to side or front to back in order to heat up the product faster. It is well known that the rotary process has more advantages than the static process.

    Recently, the food industry has become more consumer-driven. Changing demographics, consumer preferences, and shifts towards nutritious and “whole” foods greatly affect processed food marketing. Consumer-oriented approaches can address the concerns related to price and nutritional value.
    We are bringing together thermal processing and packaging specialists to present to the audience the reduction of cold spots during the thermal process of low acid foods, quality optimization of seafood based and plant based low acid products processed in a batch agitating retort, and strategies for the marketing of products processed with emerging processing technologies.
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    Food Chemistry Challenges and Advances in Reformulating Bakery Products With Simple Ingredients Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262
    The bakery industry has used processing aids such as emulsifiers, dough conditioners, and preservatives for decades to improve the tolerance of dough to overmixing and overproofing, and to get breads with softer textures that last for longer periods of time that have identical quality from batch to batch. However, today’s customers are looking for products with short ingredient labels that have simple, kitchen-cabinet sounding names. This situation is pushing the bakery industry towards replacing the traditional processing aids with products that hold a simpler ingredient declaration. During this symposium, experts in the bakery field will provide deeper insights on the challenges of replacing traditional ingredients with alternative solutions.

    To begin this session, Dr. Elena De La Peña from Ingredion will show how to use a holistic formulation approach to using native functional flours and starches and plant-based proteins to reformulate bakery products. Enzymes are excellent ingredients that hold a positive perception by consumers and have great functional capabilities that can help with removing traditional processing aids in bakeries as Dr. Dilek Austin, from Novozymes, will cover during her presentation. Alejandro Perez, from Delavau Bakery Partners, will provide information how alternative dough conditioners affect dough rheology and baking performance with the purpose of proposing a methodology for dough rheology data collection. Regarding texture, Dr. Luca Serventi will introduce the use of legume products and by-products as texturizers in bakery with a special focus on gluten-free products. Also in the texture field but oriented towards conventional bakery products, Dr. Geertrui Bosmans from Puratos will explore the functionality of blends of simple ingredients for the replacement of bleached flour and emulsifiers in layer cakes. This symposium will allow the audience to understand the challenges associated with reformulating bakery recipes with alternative processing aids as well as the strategies and tools required for conquering this quest.
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    Food Microbiology, Food Safety & Defense Research Updates of Applying Non-Thermal Technology to Improve Microbial Safety and Quality of Food Products Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    The brand new Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (FDOSS-CDC) reported that there were 5,760 outbreaks resulting in 100,939 illnesses, 5,699 hospitalizations, and 145 deaths in the U.S. from 2009 to 2015. Traditional food processing technology, typically heating, is the effective approach to kill foodborne pathogens and make food safe to eat. In the recent 10 years, there has been a growing interest in applying non-thermal processing technologies to meet consumer demand for minimally processed food. Non-thermal technology includes pulsed electric fields, high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasounds, cold-plasma, electrostatic spraying, and clean label food preservatives to modify food structure, and improve functionalities. These technologies have also been credited with improving digestibility, increasing bioactivity, enhancing sensory properties, controlling the release of flavors or nutrients, and reducing foodborne pathogens. In the last three years, research projects related to various non-thermal technology have been conducted in a wide range of food systems, from fruits and vegetables and meat and egg products to seafood and dairy products. This session will begin with brief opening remarks from one of the moderators to describe the application of non-thermal technology from food industry perspective, followed by an up-to-date summary of cold plasma research and development – its efficacy, impact on product quality, likely commercial applications, regulatory status, and key challenges for the future of key factors affecting bacteria survival and transfer. Following that, the impact of high pressure processing (HPP) on foodborne pathogen survival in ground meat products with mathematical model development and applications will be discussed. Then, the comparison studies of antimicrobials delivered by electrostatic sprayer verse conventional sprayer will be explored on poultry products with multiple pathogens and analyzed by the related agri-economic cost-effective models. In addition, a portable electrolytic sanitizing unit to control foodborne pathogen for small scale sanitizing conditions like family kitchen areas and organic farmers will be presented. Finally, a presentation regarding clean label management to improve microbial safety and shelf life of food products will conclude the session. The invited speakers include a food technologist, a food microbiologist, a food engineer scientist, and a food industry consultant. These speakers represent expertise from the food industry, government research institutions, and academia domestically and internationally.
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    Teaching & Learning Fennema Lecture Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    TBD
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    Blockchain Revolution in Food Will Turbocharge US $14 Billion Market While Saving 33 Million Lives Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Traceability Stage
    Blockchain in the food supply chain is set to revolutionize the food safety and traceability space. It provides actionable intelligence that can save 33 million lives and tons of food every year. With the aid of blockchain, tracking is accurate and tracing is precise. Moreover, this technology will support the payments, governance and compliance across the food supply chain which ensures a happy and a healthy mechanism to satisfy the growing population around the world. This is just the beginning of IOT disruption in the food supply chain and the broader connected ecosystem. In the next couple of years, this technology will dramitcally optimize the demand and supply flow in food and agriculture while creating new opportunities for all players in the supply chain, but both new and old.
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    Professional Development Adapting to Change in the Food Industry IFT Central Booth
    The food industry is in a constant state of evolving and changing. While this can create so many opportunities, it can be hard to adapt to the whiplash effect this has on day to day working. Come and learn new tools for adapting to the change and finding your flow in your career.
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    IFTNEXT Tapping Into Startup Communities for Blockchain Innovation Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Over the past few years, blockchain technology has been at the center of innovation. we have seen blockchain technology evolve and become readily available to transform different industries, especially for the food industry. Blockchain's capability of tracking ownership records and tamper-resistance can be used to solve urgent issues such as food fraud, safety recalls, supply chain inefficiency and food traceability in the current food system. Even more importantly, there's even higher stake in the potential of revolutionizing the trust system, transactions in marketplace and financing models. we see the urgency of connecting industries with the entrepreneur communities to further explore the potential application. During the short presentation, we'd like to take a deep look about the what's next through the lens of startups.
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    Poster Session 3 - Foodservice; International; Nutraceutical & Functional Foods; Nutrition; Product Development; Refrigerated & Frozen Foods Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Hall J
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    ePoster Session 17: Nutraceutical & Functional Foods Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 13: Foodservice, Muscle Foods, and Product Development Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 15: Product Development Part 2 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 18: International Division Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 14: Product Development Part 1 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 16: Nutrition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 11am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 11:20am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Professional Development Building Online Platforms to Promote Food Science IFT Central Booth
    As the digital age grows and more information becomes available, it has been easier and easier to create content. Join four people who have developed digital platforms that have promoted food science in various ways. Either through written content, podcasts, or partnerships, learn how they created their platforms, what opportunities it brought them, and the impact you can have if you start your own.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 11:40am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    IFTNEXT Feeding Tomorrow and FAO’s Sustainable Development Goals Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    The world needs the brightest minds engaged in the science of food in order to meet the challenges ahead of us, to feed a projected population of 9 billion in 2050. FAO offers a vision for food and agriculture as a key to achieve Sustainable Development Goals and Feeding Tomorrow, the Foundation of IFT, is ready to support by bringing the best and brightest minds to the science of food and to help them improve the world.  Join us to learn more about both UN SDGs and Feeding Tomorrow.
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    Food Safety & Defense, Sustainability Food Safety: Integrating Traceability, Blockchain Technology, and FSMA Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Traceability Stage
    Food safety is non-negotiable and a concept that consumers rightly demand! Achieving food safety across the food chain is a formidable challenge involving a complex matrix of interacting factors and the need for an exquisite understanding of them all. The recent past has seen great progress in controlling foodborne illness through (i) understanding infectious agents/their route into the food chain; (ii) detection/identification methods; (iii) process control mechanisms; (iv) adaptation/application of new technologies; (v) education of processors/handlers/consumers; (vi) validation/verification controls; and (vii) rigorous regulatory environment (e.g. FSMA). Despite all these advances, foodborne illness is on the rise accelerated by rapid growth/ageing of the population, urbanization, lack of sanitation in developing economies, mass tourism/international travel, conflict, and globalization of trade. The WHO recently noted “. . . the journey from where our food comes from to how it ends on our plate is longer and more complex than ever before. Food safety risks exist at every step. Our food safety and control systems must adapt and work together across sectors, along the entire food chain” (Kruse, H.J. (2015) Food safety in an international perspective. Verbr. Lebensm. 10, 105-107). Integration of oversight/control mechanisms will be critical in ensuring a safe food supply, and open/transparent communication will be essential. This symposium will explore how (i) traceability; (ii) blockchain technology; and (iii) validation/verification requirements (FSMA) interconnect, and implications for food manufacturers, consumers, and global trade.
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    Meetings IFT Journals Editorial Board Lunch (by invite only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 238-239
    Journal of Food Science Editorial Board meeting, open to members of all 3 of IFT's journals' Editorial Boards.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 12pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Professional Development You Volunteered, Now What? Translating Volunteer Experiences Into the Workplace IFT Central Booth
    Volunteering is an excellent way to give back to a community, but these experiences can also serve as key opportunities for personal and professional development. Even still, understanding how skills gained through volunteering can be utilized in real life can be a challenge. In this panel discussion, leaders from across the science of food will discuss ways these experiences can be used to enhance, and even advance, your career.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 12:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Sensory Science Pack It In, Pack It Out: Real-Life Packaging Sensory Design You Can Take With You Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390
    Sensory evaluation is grounded in the five senses, all of which interact, so it is rare to experience one form of sensory stimulus to the exclusion of the others. The senses are how humans have learned to navigate the world. Much of the literature research shows that design factors of packaging and food containers can have a strong impact on taste experience and product evaluation. However, most of this research has mainly focused on how visual appearances steer sensory impressions, including smell and taste.

    The goal of this symposium is to present IFT attendees with a practical and relevant presentation by industry professionals in the sensory and packaging space. The discussion will seek to trace the evolution of packaging, to uncover design elements and recent innovations to elevate the consumer experience, and to explore the value of sustainability in the global ecosystem. When planning a research study, packaging is often overlooked, but it is serves a vital marketing function for CPG and FMCG companies. A product’s packaging has several functions besides protecting the contents and expediting transport, handling, and storage: it also serves to grab the attention of trial consumers, to influence their willingness to buy, and even to increase the acceptance of the product for repeat purchase. The Sensory and Consumer Sciences Division (SCSD) has selected a number of practicing professionals to discuss this area and provide understanding to both the division membership and the greater food and beverage product design and development community on the status of this area of interest.
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    Food Microbiology, Food Safety & Defense Emergent Non-Thermal Food Preservation Technologies: Features, Opportunities, and Challenges of Hyperbaric Storage, Atmospheric Cold Plasma, Gaseous Chlorine Dioxide, and Low Energy Electron Beams Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385
    Non-thermal food processing technologies are gaining increasing interest since they can produce safe and fresh-like food products where heat is not applied, allowing for better sensorial, nutritional, and functional properties.
    High pressure processing (HPP), low energy electric beam (LEEB), and atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) are among the non-thermal technologies being more intensively studied (1).
     
    A new application that uses hydrostatic pressure for long-term preservation of food products is being lately studied as a potential replacement/complement of the conventional refrigeration (RF) processes. Under the name of hyperbaric storage (HS), it allows to store food products under pressure (50-100 MPa), retarding food spoilage, thus increasing shelf-life and quality, compared to the conventional RF, by vegetative microbial growth inhibition (50-75 MPa) and inactivation (65-100 MPa). As HS can be performed at uncontrolled ambient temperature, and energy is only mobilized during the short compression/decompression phases of the pressure vessel, it allows considerable energetic savings, contrary to RF, which needs an almost constant power supply (2). Several studies with highly perishable foods have demonstrated HS also keeps several quality attributes at a level better than RF and for much longer time. Recently HS has also demonstrated efficiency to control bacterial spores germination and outgrowth, including a case able to germinate and cause spoilage in pasteurized acidic foods (3).

    Dry foods of plant origin, such as spices, cereals, nuts, and seeds are a growing concern as carriers of pathogenic microorganisms. Since the microorganisms contaminating dry foods reside on the food’s surface, the inner parts need not be exposed to the decontamination treatment (4). Low energy electron beam (LEEB) works with electrons with energies of 300 keV or lower. Inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms is achieved by damaging their DNA and RNA. Due to the electrons’ low energies, it can preserve both nutritional and organoleptic (i.e. taste, smell, appearance) properties of dry foods. To date, LEEB has been successfully validated for pathogen reduction on spices at an industrial scale.

    Cold plasma is a platform technology with an array of demonstrated applications in the agriculture, food, and bio-processing sectors. With advancements in plasma science, a sharp rise in the development of plasma sources and plasma processes for decontamination of foods, food property modification, and efficient processing is being witnessed [5]. New systems are being developed for plasma assisted seed germination and nitrogen fixation in agriculture. Attempts to scale-up plasma technologies to industrial production rates are underway, with the involvement of many research groups from academia and industry. Features, opportunities and challenges of HS, ACP, and LEEB as emergent non-thermal food preservation technologies will be presented and discussed.

    1. Balasubramaniam V.M(Bala) et al., Annu. Rev. Food Sci. Technol., 2015. 6(1): p. 435–62.
    2. Fernandes P.A.R. et al., Food Eng. Rev., 2014. 7(1): p. 1–10.
    3. Pinto C.A. et al., Food Microbiol, 2018. 74: p.125–31.
    4. Baba T. et al., Radiat. Phys. Chem, 2004. 71: p.207–209.
    5. Misra, N.N et al., Cold plasma in food and agriculture: Fundamentals and applications. Academic Press, Elsevier.
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    Food Safety & Defense Nutraceutical and Functional Food Regulations in the United States, Europe, and the Asian Sub-Continents Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273
    Over the last three years there has been significant change in the nutraceuticals and functional foods regulations in the United States and around the world. On the other hand, a large number of additional population around the world started believing in the efficacy and functions of nutraceuticals and functional foods backed by scientific research studies. Additionally, a number of structurally and functionally active novel nutraceuticals and several new functional beverages have been introduced into the marketplace around the world. Furthermore, Japan and USA have undergone a major strategic change in the nutraceutical regulation since late 2015, so this symposium will create an awareness in the IFT delegates attending this symposium. 

    On an average, there has been a 35-60% change in the worldwide regulations in nutraceuticals and functional foods since 2008. In addition, the common public is gaining confidence in the quality products backed by sophisticated quality control of nutraceuticals and functional foods, a broad spectrum of safety studies and GRAS, peer-reviewed publications, and cutting-edge human clinical studies. NSF approval has become a key quality mark in nutraceuticals and functional foods. The objective of this second edition is to capture all the updates and new contemporary topics and bring it to nutraceutical and functional food institutions and companies, regulatory authorities, and to consumers.

    On the other hand, there is another discrete category known as “medical foods,” which has been overlooked by many in the food industry. This symposium will focus on a lecture on medical foods. Furthermore, kosher and halal certification, gluten free foods, and GMO foods are the subject of increasing interest in the USA. A detailed lecture will be provided by an eminent professor from Cornell University, Department of Food Science, New York.
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    Food Processing & Packaging, Food Engineering Advances in Pulsed Electric Field Processing Toward Future Sustainable, Healthy, and Safe Food Production Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285
    The food and bio-based industry are urged to find novel solutions to ensure sustainable, healthy, and safe product manufacturing in the future. A non-thermal technique able to present such a solution is pulsed electric field (PEF) processing. PEF technology is of growing interest for the food and biotech industry, where it was first implemented for potato and juice production. A low energy requirement, continuous operability, and short processing times are major advantages in comparison to conventional processing techniques. Since the first reports of PEF impact on plant, animal, and microbial cells in the 1960s, numerous applications in food and bioprocessing have been investigated.

    Nowadays PEF is readily applied in other disciplines, including medicine and wastewater treatment. By varying the pulse amplitude and pulse length, a broad range of effects are induced, such as electroporated cells, cell permeabilization, and microbial inactivation, as well as cell disintegration.

    In addition to those biological effects, pulsed systems are employed to determine target velocity, accelerate electrons and positrons within particle accelerators, and generate high peak power for fusion research as well as laser generation. Next generation PEF applications within the bio-based industry are emerging by bridging the gap between non-food and food applications. Implementation of knowledge in the food and biotech industry opens the possibilities to challenge the limitations of current PEF applications.

    Emerging pulsed electric field processes are combined processing approaches such as PEF and vacuum drying, the integration of PEF into whole biorefinery concepts and the utilization of nanosecond pulses to increase intracellular electro effects.

    The application of nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in bioprocess engineering is of major interest as the energy input could be further reduced compared to conventional PEF processing. Microbial contamination control, increased cell proliferation, and targeted release of intracellular valuables are among the possible applications.
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    Food Health & Nutrition, Sustainability Rethinking Protein Sources: Industry Perspectives and Consumer Preferences Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262
    Experts in the development of plant-based meat and plant-based nutrition will discuss recent advances in plant-based meat science and technology; how to most effectively develop academic/industry partnerships focused on advancing plant-based meat R&D; the latest research findings, including crop breeding, sourcing raw materials, extrusion manufacturing, and product development; and the nutritional benefits of plant-based meat over traditional meat and its potential to improve health outcomes.
  • -
    Food Engineering, Food Chemistry Tribology in Food: Past, Current, and Future Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392
    Tribology, the study of friction, lubrication, and wear, has garnered significant interest in the last several decades, with a marked increase in publications on this topic in the last few years. This increase is mainly due to the current opinion that food tribological behaviors can help explain textural attributes related to friction, such as grittiness, smoothness, and astringency, that cannot be explained by rheological behaviors. While no universal relationships between food friction behaviors and food textural attributes have been found to date, tribological measurements generally provide complimentary information to standard rheological measurements.
     
    This session will open with a discussion of basic tribological information needed to understand the current state of the food tribology field. Next, we will cover best practices in tribological measurements. Because tribology is a system property, not a material property, great care must be taken in selecting measurement surfaces, environmental conditions, and measurement protocols. This discussion will also cover common issues in tribological testing and how to overcome them. Afterward, we will present current findings on relationships between food tribological behaviors and sensory attributes, as this topic has provoked great interest in the current literature. Next, we will discuss food wear, which is currently a highly underexplored topic in the literature. Wear behaviors may relate to food oral and industrial processing behaviors, potentially serving as a predictor for food breakdown and processing ability. Finally, we will close the session with a panel discussion of future applications of tribology.
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    Sustainability, Food Health & Nutrition United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 2: Achieving Zero Hunger by Reducing Food Waste, Improving Food Security, and Developing Innovations in Food Science Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-386
    Already over two billion people worldwide are affected by some form of food insecurity such as malnutrition or poverty. Furthermore, the world population is projected to grow to 9 billion by 2050, while urbanization is set to increase by 78%. The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018” (FAO) states that the number of hungry people is on the rise already today. While a great deal of attention is paid to improve the quality, production and delivery of food, an oft neglected aspect is preventing food loss as it makes its way from the producer to the consumer. Nearly one third of all food produced for human consumption is lost before it makes its way to the consumer. Global food supply chain losses are substantial, and amidst talk of having to increase food production significantly to meet growing demands, there appears to be a gap to identify how much food is lost and wasted and how we can prevent these food losses. Reducing this loss will not only have a direct impact on hunger by increasing the available supply of food, it will have several indirect economic and environmental benefits that can be observed throughout the food value chain. 

    Another aspect of achieving zero hunger, is solving “hidden hunger” or malnutrition. It is often the case that even when adequate food reaches a population, the proper nutrition is lacking. Finding the means to deliver proper and often specialized nutrients to large target populations is a vital technology in the fight against global hunger. This requires transformational thinking and innovation some examples of which will be introduced in this session.

    Lastly, this session also aims at providing clarity on how interested food technologists could participate either remotely or locally in the various programs managed by UN food agencies. This is a first collective step between these organizations and IFT to find avenues to identify food technology capabilities and resources that can contribute to the strengthening of capacities of local communities that these organizations assist.

    There do not exist clear venues for food technology professionals to contribute their expertise and collaborate with multilateral organizations in projects either remotely or locally. For example, WFP feeds 80 million people annually with only a staff of 20 food technologists contributing to the development, distribution and management of the safety and quality of food value chains in some of the planet’s most remote and insecure regions. We hope to bring awareness of the demand for food technologists in these vital sectors so we would have the talent necessary to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger. 
  • -
    Food Chemistry Chasing the Perfect Bite: Advancements in the Alternative Meat Landscape and Technology Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    The plant-based meat alternative market continues to expand quickly, with a projected growth of 6.8% between 2018 and 2023. This growth will transform the plant-based meat market from an estimated $4.63 billion (USD) in 2018 to $6.3 billion by 2023, thanks to an increase in consumers who seek healthy, high-protein, and sustainable options to traditional meat products. Flexitarians, those who consume a primarily vegetarian diet but occasionally seek meat or fish, also contribute substantially to meat alternative consumption as their principal protein source. In the past, traditional plant-based foods often had the appearance and texture of mixed vegetable patties; however, consumer demand has shifted. Today, trending products are the plant-based versions of animal-based meats which are similar in look, feel, and taste. Joanna Clifton of Innova Market Insights will open this session with an introduction to the alternative meat industry including growth, trends observed, and challenges encountered. Our next speaker, Dariush Ajami, Chief Innovation Officer of Beyond Meat, will share the production hurdles faced during manufacturing as well as the complexities of delivering organoleptically satisfying finished products. Jenni Harrington of Buhler Group will discuss advancements in extrusion technology and equipment, highlighted with tips on effective use of extrusion to create a desired finished product. Finally, the session will close with an overview of key plant-based proteins and functional ingredients by Ryan Kowalski from Ingredion, showcasing how to deliver a pleasant eating experience from both a taste and texture perspective. Session attendees will gain an introduction to the growing alternative meat segment with an understanding of finished product challenges and consumer acceptance. In addition, familiarity with equipment and key functional ingredients used during extrusion of plant-based meat alternatives will be provided.
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    Food Processing & Packaging, Food Safety & Defense Validation of Nonthermal Processing Methods Used for Controlling Pathogens in Foods to Ensure Compliance With Regulatory Requirements Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    Nonthermal processing methods have become popular due to the notable advantages over traditional food pasteurization methods. HPP validation is complex and poses a serious food safety risk if the correct processing parameters are not met. Validation protocols, as well an indicator to ensure foods receive the correct time-at-pressure cycle, will be discussed.

    Best practices and challenges related to the validation and adoption of nonthermal technologies for microbial inactivation and regulatory compliance will be presented.
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    Food Health & Nutrition, Food Chemistry Fat Is Back: Emerging Science Around Health, Nutrition, and Application Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    The science around fats is turning around to reshape the current knowledge as lots of new research findings are emerging in this area. Milk fats do not comprise only saturated fats but also other important components, such as phospholipids, branch chain fatty acids, short and medium chain fatty acids, etc., which play critical role in human health and nutrition. Recent findings suggest that (i) obesity risk may not be related to consumption of higher fat dairy foods, (ii) branch chain fatty acid type components may be promising in perinatal nutrition, (iii) consumption of saturated fats might not be linked with risk of CVD, and (iv) there is a link between dairy fat biomarkers and reduced risk of diabetes. Overall, a shift in thinking on the connection between dairy foods and heart health, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes as well as other diseases is shifting. These findings have a profound effect on consumer behavior as the consumption of full fat food products is going up. This session will cover the latest research, health benefits, and applications of dairy fats.
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    Teaching & Learning Fenema Workshop Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    TBD
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    Awards & Competitions, Student IFTSA College Bowl Competition - Rounds 7-12 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    Featuring eight regional team finalists, the College Bowl Competition will take place in multiple rounds of double elimination until a winner is crowned.  The final two-to-three rounds will be held during the IFTSA Closing Ceremony on Tuesday.
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    IFTNEXT Formulating for All Ages: Creating Food and Drink as Ongoing Wellness Solutions Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Now is the time to create food and drink for healthy aging - Based on the Mintel Food and Drink Trend “Through the Ages,” more food and drink companies can take inspiration from the beauty and personal care category and create products that help people prepare to live better for longer. Formulation opportunities include heart, bone and joint health as well as brain and eye health.
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    Sustainability, Food Health & Nutrition Food and Nutrition Security and Sustainability: Science, Technology, and Policy Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    With the challenges we face in meeting the food and nutrition needs of our rapidly increasing population in an environmentally sustainable way, it is imperative that we step up dialogue and interdisciplinary research and development; catalyze and implement solution-oriented innovations with speed and urgency; and drive policy changes to effect the needed transformations in our global food supply chains. This program convenes experts from multiple disciplines in the food system to discuss advances in gene-related techniques and other technologies and developments being pursued to enhance agricultural outcomes, food loss and waste reduction, and drive sustainability. How global food trade, politics and policy interplay will also be addressed.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 1pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Student, Awards & Competitions Developing Solutions for Developing Countries Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 343-345
    The 2019 competition theme is: In 2015, the United Nations adopted 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. More information about the SDGs can be found here. Create a nutritious food product targeting a particular developing country and addressing at least TWO of the UN’s SDGs, excluding the ‘zero hunger’ SDG.
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    Student, Awards & Competitions Smart Snacks for Kids Product Development Competition - Tasting (Closed) New Orleans Marriott - Salon A (3rd floor)
    The IFTSA Smart Snacks for Kids Competition challenges students to develop a fun and nutritious food or beverage product targeted at kids and/or teens. Teams are empowered to use their imagination in order to engage their chosen audience in the science and overall appeal behind a novel product of their creation. A crucial component of a winning product is the team’s ability to relay the food or beverage’s ”smart” qualities to both a technical AND a general audience. Winners will be announced during the IFTSA Closing Ceremony.
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    Student, Awards & Competitions The 29th Annual IFTSA & MARS Product Development Competition - Tasting (Closed) New Orleans Marriott - Salon B (3rd Floor)
    Closed Event!  In this long-standing annual competition, each participating team develops a new food idea and carries the concept through production and marketing, similar to a commercial product development team. Winners will be announced during the IFTSA Closing Ceremony.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 1:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    INFOR: Preparing for the Future of Traceability Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Traceability Stage
    The demand for end-to-end traceability is real and Blockchain is often positioned as the ultimate solution to address this.  Most analysts, though, believe this nascent system needs to mature and is many years away from delivering real value.  Regardless there are solutions available today that companies can adopt to address most of their traceability needs as well as set the stage for future traceability technologies.  Join this session to learn more about what your peers are doing
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    Professional Development Negotiating Your Salary and Benefits Package IFT Central Booth
    We all know we have the ability to negotiate our salary, but what are best practices? What other factors can be worked into our negotiation package? Whether you're searching for your first job or looking to learn more about the negotiation process, join this session to find out more!
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 1:40pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    IFTNEXT Climate Action for a Secure Food System Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    The food system is in an interesting predicament;it's a significant contributor to one of its own biggest threats—climate change. Poor land-management is degrading our soil, releasing greenhouse gases, and bringing about catastrophic events such as droughts, floods, fires, among others. Farmers and food industry members are deeply vulnerable to the disasters brought on by climate change, but the level to which they implement or encourage climate-friendly practices is dependent on multiple competing factors. This session will challenge the current thinking on climate mitigation with the understanding that multiple sectors must come together to make headway on this global issue. We will include cutting-edge innovations from the organic industry, which has been focusing its resources on climate mitigation and adaptation, to understand how these experiences and lessons can be used as a learning tool to advance climate-friendly techniques across sectors.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 2pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Food Health & Nutrition Plant-Based Proteins: Intakes, Adequacy, and Future Research Needs Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    There are 9 amino acids that are indispensable, meaning that they cannot be produced endogenously and therefore must be consumed from the diet so that proper protein synthesis can take place. As consumers become increasingly conscientious about their health, the environment, and the rights and welfare of animals, consumer interest in plant-based proteins has increased. As such, the food industry has responded with the introduction of foods containing novel plant-based proteins in the marketplace. How is protein quality determined, and can foods with novel plant-based proteins meet the protein requirements of the different segments of a population?   
     
    In this symposium, a background on dietary protein and amino acid requirements and the health implications of not meeting or exceeding these requirements, as well as the most recent advancements in the determination of protein quality, will be presented. In addition, information related to global trends in current protein intakes, including trends related to the intakes of animal versus plant-based proteins, will be presented. A discussion of the tools used to estimate dietary intakes in key global markets will be presented, and using these surveys, estimates of the intakes of total and animal- vs. plant-based proteins will be presented for different age and gender groups. An assessment of intakes versus recommendations will be provided to determine whether the consumption of protein is inadequate, adequate, or excessive, with a special focus on vulnerable age groups and individuals consuming predominantly plant-based diets. Finally, using data from the published literature, a systematic review of studies conducted in vegans/vegetarians will be presented, with the objective of determining whether the intakes of total protein and the indispensable amino acids are sufficient and whether there are any health implications.
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    W.K. Kellogg Award Lecture: Harnessing Food Technology to Improve Public Health and Nutrition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285
    The presentation will describe how Food Technology has revolutionized nutrition over the decades. It will also highlight how new advances in both food technology and nutrition will impact on global public health. Using case examples, the presentation will illustrate future challenges and opportunities that the intertwining of food technology and nutrition offers for a better world.
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    Sensory Science How Humanization and Premiumization Shape Pet Food Development Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    The pet food industry has been growing significantly in the past decades, as consumers are paying closer attention to the needs of their furry companions’ food than ever before. Social media exposure is also helping to provide additional transparency around food to consumers. Nowadays, pets typically live longer and eat better, with pet owners increasingly seeking less processed and more natural, premium pet food.
     
    Based on Euromonitor 2018, the global pet care market is expected to post dynamic growth compared to most other fast-moving consumer goods (FMGC) in 2018. Two overlapping trends, both in force for nearly two decades and both primarily marketing-driven, continue to influence the infusion of new products and services into the U.S. pet market: humanization and premiumization. To stay competitive, pet food companies need to make sure the food stays up to the trends and also tastes good to meet the demands of a competitive market. Due to the unique nature of pet food research, while the purchasing power is not the with the end consumer, there are a lot of challenges the pet food company has to face on a daily basis.


    This symposium will first review current evaluation methods being used in pet food sensory research, then go into novel research on pet enjoyment, followed with the use of traditional and novel ingredients and how they are applied in pet food development driven by humanization and premiumization trends.
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    Sustainability Utilizing Sustainability to Drive Value Across the Supply Chain Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    With changes to the environment on the rise and the rise in global population, food producers are forced to answer the question “How can we pursue future growth and survival with limited resources?” Agricultural production has been estimated to contribute 17 to 32% of global greenhouse emissions. When taken holistically, the food chain compromises food/ingredient production, processing, packaging, transportation, retail, consumption, and waste generation. Food suppliers have caught onto the fact that in order to thrive as a business it is vitally important for the business to implement sustainable practices to create a competitive advantage and have social impact, which in turn leads to increased market share. In this panel discussion we will be looking at three perspectives from the value chain: food ingredients, food processing, and food packaging. The speakers will discuss the initiatives that they have undertaken to reach their sustainability goals, the reasoning behind those initiatives, the challenges being faced in this area in their sector, and, more importantly from the business standpoint, how sustainability creates value for their businesses long term. In addition, we will be looking at the role of NGOs in developing sustainable practices across all three areas of the value chain and their role as drivers of growth through PR and work done with government bodies.
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    Food Engineering, Food Microbiology Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) Technology for the Nonthermal Pasteurization of Powdered Foods Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392
    Powdered foods are widely used as ingredients in manufacturing processed foods or consumed directly by humans for their energy and nutrient contents. The popularity of powdered foods is rising due to the convenience and versatility of their usage. In order to extend their shelf-life and prevent the occurrence of food-borne diseases, powdered foods, like other food products, have to be decontaminated. Inappropriate and insufficient decontamination has led to numerous outbreaks of foodborne diseases in recent years due to the existence of pathogenic microbes in dry milk powder, infant formula, spices, bread crust, etc., or through the cross contamination when inappropriately pasteurized food ingredients such as spices were added into food products. The current processes to decontaminate powdered foods are thermal treatment, gamma irradiation, microwave, UV light, pulsed light, and fumigation, etc. However, these processes causes significant unwanted changes in powdered foods including moisture content, nutrient loss, and other chemical-related safety concerns.
     
    In this session, intense pulsed light (IPL) will be presented and discussed as an emerging technology for non-thermal and safe pasteurization of powdered foods without inducing significant nutritional and quality damages. This session is a concentrated symposium that will introduce to the audience the fundamental inactivation mechanisms of IPL technology, the system development and scale-up possibilities, and the current industrial manufacturers.
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    Food Chemistry, Food Health & Nutrition Healthy Fats: Oleogels as Replacements for Saturated and Trans Fats Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-386
    This session is a joint session between the Food Chemistry division and the Dairy Foods division of IFT. “Healthy fat” has been identified as a priority topic in the 2019 IFT Annual Meeting for these divisions. Oleogel (or organogel) technology has been recognized as one of the most promising technologies to replace saturated/trans fats used in many food products such as margarine, spread, shortening, ice cream, icing, and chocolate. Typical edible oleogels consist of a small amount of an edible oleogelator and vegetable oil. Properties of an oleogel are very similar to those of conventional fats containing high contents of saturated and/or trans fats. The interest in oleogels, as indicated by the number of publications, has dramatically increased over the last decade due to the need for alternatives to saturated/trans fats. This session will focus on the most recent advances in this technology and future directions.
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    Food Processing & Packaging Future (Plant) Protein Processing Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262
    The market for products with plant-derived proteins has exploded in recent years and is predicted by market analysts to continue to grow at 6-17% per year through 2024. Protein processors and ingredient suppliers are working to address rapidly growing demand by exploring new sources, optimizing yield of existing crops, and extracting proteins from side streams. In this session, we explore the technologies enabling protein source diversification. Each talk examines a new or emerging plant protein source. We explain the innovative processes underpinning the emergence of these sources, and explore the case for applying the process to other sources. Each talk highlights the benefits to functional protein performance and concludes with the implications for product innovation in plant-based foods.
     
    To enable new protein sources, food industry processes need to be revisited or developed to take advantage of pulses, algae, and insects, among other foods. Our first speaker walks through state-of-the-art solutions to process them. Special attention is given to pulses, a low cost, nutrient-rich protein source which can be incorporated in various daily food items to improve the nutrition and sustainability of our diets. Challenges and opportunities in plant-based protein processing and market relevance will be discussed.
     
    Our second speaker describes the concept of hybrid ingredients as a sustainable plant-based food raw material. Efficient use of food resources and avoiding food waste are getting more and more important. Isolation of components is not always reasonable due to energy intensive extraction processes, which may also cause unwanted modifications in component functionality, e.g. denaturation of proteins. Therefore, an agile processed sustainable food ingredient should preferably be a hybrid (e.g. protein-carbohydrate in the case of bran fractions and protein concentrates) that deliver multi-scale functionalities and avoid production of unwanted waste streams.
     
    The poor solubility in water of many plant proteins poses a challenge to traditional processing. The research presented in our third talk demonstrates that this poor solubility in water can be turned into a benefit, applying a purely physical (i.e. not chemical) process to add functional value to cereal proteins. The result is a quasi-dissolved, sub-micron particle of protein. The particles show promising and versatile properties with respect to stabilization and encapsulation. In this way traditionally lower-added-value insoluble proteins, for example those from wheat or corn, can be applied in a variety of food applications.
     
    Many of the functionality challenges that limit the application of novel plant proteins may be circumvented using 3D printing technologies. In our final presentation, the use of 3D printing technologies such as fused deposition modelling, powder bed printing and selective laser sintering will be explored as potential processes that can integrate novel proteins into food structures. The incorporation of novel plant proteins from chickpeas, soybeans, and fava beans into 3D printed food products will be highlighted. Functionalities that enable successful 3D printing will be identified and translated to conclusions about the potential of using 3D printing technologies for product development concepts. The utility of 3D printing technologies for offering flexible, personalized formulations using novel plant proteins will be described.
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    Product Development & Ingredient Innovations The ABC of Gen Z: Who Are They and Why Are They Important to the Food Industry? Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    By the end of 2019 Gen Z will surpass Millennials as the most populous generation, comprising 7.7 billion people, or 32% of the global population. This year those born in 2001 will be turning 18. They will be entering college and in 2020 they will account for $29-$143 billion in direct spending and will influence a much larger amount. They have been growing up in a period of unrest and uncertainty with ubiquitous digital connections in a world that is increasingly urban and diverse. How do all of these factors impact who they are and how they make decisions? How do they behave in retail and food service? What kinds of ingredients and foods are they looking for? Join us to learn more while we explore these topics.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Meat Hybrids and Analogs: Product Trends, Research, and Nutrition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273
    Historically, protein advancements have primarily focused on animal based muscle, milk, and eggs. However in recent years, consumers increasing curiosity into protein heavy diets and concern for food manufacturing processes has fueled the development of all protein sources, especially alternatives to animal-based. This rapid development of alternative meat-like and plant-based protein alternatives in the recent decade has drastically shifted the light in which protein is now viewed, researched, and consumed. Plant-based protein inclusion into traditionally meat-centric meals and eating habits is not a new concept, nor is inclusion of plant fibers into processed meats; but, deliberately enhancing processed meats with plant proteins, or hybridizing, is emerging. Development of meat-like analogs and, subsequently, meat-plant hybrids has exploded as a result. Major restaurant chains have been adding alternative proteins to menus for a few years now, but recently hybrids are also starting to gain popularity as well. Research shows that inclusion of plant fibers and proteins can standardize and benefit the nutritional value and functionality of processed meats. Processing advancements in the industry have greatly improved the eating experience of meatless analogs by better improving texture and flavor and meat-plant hybrids and analogs serve to marry and amplify the best components of plant and animal ingredients. Developing a deeper understanding of the role meat-plant hybrids in the rapidly changing protein market will provide tools for food scientists and industry experts to push the envelope of protein product and process developments. This session is a collaboration between IFT's Muscle Foods Division, Protein Division and Phi Tau Sigma.
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    Sensory Science Consumer Choice, Not a New Nicholas Sparks Novel, Rather How We Observe and Measure Matters Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385
    The goal of this curated symposium is to present IFT members with a dialog between industry professionals on the real truths and myths behind practices that are thought to be commonly agreed upon approaches. When planning a research study, choice behavior is often overlooked. Choice behavior seems arbitrary, but the truth (or myth) on the issue is much more involved and elaborate than quickly running a consumer study. The literature tells us there is an underlying non-cognitive principle to the matter, as well as imparting context and the decision process consumers make/follow. The Sensory and Consumer Sciences Division (SCSD) has selected a number of practicing professionals to discuss this area and provide understanding to both the division membership and the greater food and beverage product design and development community on the status of this area of interest.
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    Food Safety & Defense Hazard Assessment and Standard Development for Colors from Natural Sources Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390
    Food color additives from natural sources have become popular in the global market. Referred to as “natural” colors by consumers, they are sourced from plants, minerals, and animals. Unlike synthetic color additives, in the US “natural” colors are exempt from the FDA color certification process. However, safety evaluations of colors from natural sources indicate that they may be associated with toxins, may induce neurotoxicity, and may promote selective cytotoxicity (normal and neoplastic cells). Despite the exempt regulatory status for color additives from natural sources, the development and application of more robust safety assessments, including classic toxicology and a more rigorous application of physiological chemistry, is warranted. Moreover, current regulations for colors from natural sources lack the consistent definitions and internationally accepted quality control and product safety specifications that typically comprise a harmonized regulatory framework. The development of an increasing global supply chain for colors from natural sources raises safety and quality concerns, including adulteration, pesticide residues, solvent residues, heavy metals, and microbiological contaminants. Hazard analysis has indicated that safety risks for colors from natural sources are high. In addition, there is a lack of agreement on standard testing methods to ensure safety, quality, and purity of food color additives from natural sources. Hence, developing public standards including methods and specifications for colors from natural sources will provide a science-based approach for the needed quality and safety assurances. This symposium will first provide a review on global regulations for color additives from natural sources. Then safety evaluation and hazard assessment for colors from natural sources will be presented. Lastly Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) standards development will be introduced as a mitigation strategy for ensuring quality and purity of food colors from natural sources. Case studies will also be presented, including FCC standards development for carmine and carthamus yellow.
  • -
    iTradeNetwork: Food Safety, Brand Loyalty, and More: The Value of the iTrade’s Traceability Platform, iTracefresh
  • -
    Professional Development Cultural Competence Begins with You IFT Central Booth
    Cultural competence is the ability to understand, appreciate, and interact with people from cultures or belief systems that are different from one’s own. With shifts in global demographics continuing to impact organizations, what role can you play to confidently connect with others from diverse backgrounds. 
  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 2:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 2:40pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

  • -
    IFTNEXT AI for Innovation in Product Development Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Artificial Intelligence is changing industries, fields, and the physical world. Now its creating new products that consumers will love. Join us to learn about the algorithms and technology behind Gastrograph AI, a specialized machine learning and artificial intelligence platform that works with human sensory perception to help shape food and beverage products for the consumer packaged goods industry.  Learn how AI/ML is taking big data and predictive analytics in to industries that have always had data on products, but couldn't quite optimize or quantify perception.  We can talk about specific issues within the world of food and drink in a town that appreciates both and bring some real world business cases to light.
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    ePoster Session 22: Food Packaging Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    Professional Development Why You Should Become the Traceability Guru at Your Organization IFT Central Booth
    Traceability is a rapidly developing area and hot topic in the science of food. Becoming a traceability subject matter expert within your organization can be instrumental in building your versatility, reputation, and ultimately your career. Join this session to explore ways of establishing yourself as a traceability guru and learn how traceability could be your calling.
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    ePoster Session 19: Food Engineering Part 1 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    Poster Session 4 - Food Engineering; Food Packaging; Nonthermal Processing Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Hall J
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    ePoster Session 23: Nonthermal Processing Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 20: Food Engineering Part 2 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    ePoster Session 21: Food Engineering Part 3 Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Room 293 - 296
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    (( centricity )) & OATS Center at Purdue University: Solving Integration Headaches Once And For All With The Open Source Trellis Framework
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    Meetings, Networking & Social Fellows Roundtable (Invitation Only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 242
    Invitation Only: IFT Fellows gather for annual networking event.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 3pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Tues, 3:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Professional Development Trends, Motivations, and Expectations of the Future Science of Food Workforce: Feeding Tomorrow Research Data IFT Central Booth
    Feeding Tomorrow, the Foundation of IFT, in collaboration with the Council of Food Science Administrators, will share original research findings that provide perspective on motivations and influencers that drove students to pursue a food science education path. Panelists will share perspectives on how this data will impact the future of the science of food profession.
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    IFTNEXT The Future of Food: Innovation, Commercialization, Supply Chain
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    Professional Development Critical Experiences to Elevate Your Career IFT Central Booth
    What experiences are critical in helping you advance your career? What is available and why should you care and take charge of your career plan?  Attend this interactive session to find out!
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    Networking & Social Division Networking Reception Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 243-245
    You're in for a fun-filled networking event at the annual Division Networking Reception!
    Open to any and all IFT19 attendees, attend this FREE event to speed-network with IFT's 24 Division leaders and volunteers all in one
    place. Enjoy an open bar and light, passed appetizers!
    No ticket required, just bring your business cards!
    Learn more about IFT's Division at http://www.ift.org/community/divisions.aspx
    #IFTConnect
    #IFTDivisions
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    Student, Networking & Social IFTSA and Feeding Tomorrow Student Celebration Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    All student attendees are invited to celebrate the IFT Student Association Competition Finalists and Feeding Tomorrow Scholarship recipients. Students will also have the opportunity to network, view competition finalists’ projects and celebrate among the best and brightest of IFT. Enjoy this “pre-party” just prior to the IFT Student Association Closing Ceremony. Special thanks to the Feeding Tomorrow Champions and IFT Student Association Sponsors for making this celebration, and many other student opportunities, possible.
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    Networking & Social Annual Business Meeting & Banquet: American Association of Food Scientists for the Indian Subcontinent (AAFSIS) Nirvana Indian Cuisine (4308 Magazine Street, New Orleans, LA)
    AAFSIS Annual Business Meet & Banquet serves as an excellent networking opportunity for students and professionals interested in the Indian subcontinent and beyond.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $42, Student - $20
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Networking & Social Sensory & Consumer Sciences Division Event Landry's Seafood House (620 Decatur Street, New Orleans, LA)
    Head to IFT's Sensory & Consumer Sciences Division social! Bid on silent auction items (cash or credit accepted) and enjoy 2 drink tickets per person. Heavy appetizers will be served.

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  Professional - $60, Student - $20
    Click here to register for this event!
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    Student, Awards & Competitions IFTSA Closing Ceremony Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    The IFTSA Closing Ceremony will take place immediately following the Student Celebration. Student competition winners will be announced, the championship rounds of the College Bowl Competition will take place, and IFTSA leadership will be introduced.
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    Student, Networking & Social IFTSA Student Party Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - La Nouvelle Ballroom
    IFT19 student attendees are welcome to enjoy a relaxed atmosphere of fun and networking with your peers.
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    Meetings CRFSFS Editorial Board Breakfast (by invite only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 237
    Comprehensive Reviews Editorial Board meeting.
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    Meetings Feeding Tomorrow Science of Food Educator Expo Program (Invitation Only) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 238-239
    Feeding Tomorrow invites local science educators, career guidance counselors, and youth influencers from partner organizations to explore the IFT19 Food Expo. The aim of the Science of Food Educator Expo Tour program is to raise awareness and understanding of the types of careers available for students in food science and technology.
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    Student, Networking & Social IFTSA Student Lounge Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 353-355
    To meet up with students, visit the Student Lounge, sponsored by PepsiCo. Be sure to stop by and pick up your student events brochure, OFG, and PepsiCo swag! Representatives from PepsiCo will be on hand, during specific times, to talk about all of the internship and full-time opportunities available with PepsiCo.
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    Sensory Science Enhancing Consumer Acceptability of Novel Ingredients and Processes: A ‘Product Plus’ Approach Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390
    The growth in scope and scale of innovation programs within food and beverage businesses is evidenced by the myriad of new ingredients, recipe reformulations, new technologies, and revised packaging formats that can be found across numerous product categories. Some of these initiatives are driven by changing regulatory frameworks, while others are a response to address either new or poorly met existing consumer needs.
     
    Consumer acceptability of these new initiatives is critical in maintaining a vibrant and effective food and beverage sector, however, a structural shift in the consumer food value equation is creating a significant challenge for industry in terms of innovation adoption rates. While traditional drivers such as taste, price and convenience in ‘the consumer value equation’ remain intact, the proportion of consumers who consider a series of evolving drivers as a significant part of the purchase decision has grown substantially. These evolving value drivers include attributes such as health & wellness, safety, social impact, experience and transparency.
     
    Within health and wellness consumers include attributes ranging from nutritional content to organic production to all-natural ingredients to fewer artificial ingredients. Safety encompasses attributes such as the absence of allergens and fewer ingredients. Social impact includes attributes such as local sourcing, sustainability, and animal welfare. Experience includes attributes such as the retail environment, personalization and brand interaction, while transparency relates to attributes such as clear labeling and trusted third party certification. Given the shifting nature of the consumer food drivers described above, purchase decisions are increasingly based on “product plus’’ factors, such as specific ingredients, how the product was made, where it was made, and what corporate values the manufacturer exemplify, to name but a few.

    This proposed session will provide insights on these evolving consumer drivers within a social, individual and product evaluation framework. The application of semiotics, multisensory and cross modal correspondences, industry practitioner perspectives, and novel approaches in consumer sensory product evaluation related to product development will be discussed through four podium presentations by leading experts in their respective fields.
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    Food Chemistry Functional Lipids: Unlocking Their Potential in Food Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-387
    This session will focus on considerations related to the usage of lipids in emulsion-based food systems such as the dairy matrix. Novel strategies will be discussed for preventing lipid oxidation in these types of systems as well as how the incorporation of various types of fat can alter the functional and nutritional properties of the food.
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    Food Processing & Packaging Current Issues and Innovations in Commercial Brewing Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385
    Global beer-manufacturing continues in transition as craft brews increase in popularity while large-volume producers merge and redefine themselves to changing consumer tastes. In 2017, craft beer sales rose approximately 5% in the U.S. while total beer consumption dropped 1.2%; craft beers’ share of the U.S. market is now approximately 12.7%, representing $26 billion in sales. Experimentation with novel results is part of the expectation in craft-brewing circles. Small breweries are more nimble, producing small volumes of product in changing flavor directions. The high-volume, popular brands are well-aware of the increasing popularity of craft beers with increased emphasis on flavor and uniqueness. Consequently, there is business pressure for even more consistent reproducibility of their own products in addition to an enhanced perception of flavor improvement or novelty. Today’s beer drinkers are far more demanding. This symposium will address three important areas related to beer quality and product development; those areas are: (1) beer flavors (current trends, development, and stability); (2) activities and use of exogenous enzymes in beer-making; and (3) development of strains of brewing yeasts for improvements in sensory quality and other desirable properties. Use of genetic engineering for strain improvements will be overviewed. Beer production as a technical topic is not well-represented at the IFT annual meeting; it is hoped this symposium will assist in drawing interest and participation of brewers to IFT annual meetings.
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    The Labeling of Bioengineered (BE) Foods: Consumer Perception and Industry Impact Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262
    Bioengineered (BE) foods, previously referred to as genetically modified (GM) foods, are defined by the world health organization (WHO) as “organisms…in which the genetic material (DNA) has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally by mating and/or natural recombination” (WHO, 2014). The concept is not new; genetic modification of crops and foods has been occurring for centuries, (e.g., breeding programs to introduce desired traits). Although the American Medical Association, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the WHO have all endorsed concepts that BE foods are “safe” for consumption, a large portion of consumers do not believe this to be true, even condemning such foods as “Frankenfoods.” This symposium aims to present the current global regulations regarding BE food labeling, with a focus on the new U.S. Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS). It will highlight consumer perceptions of BE foods and the impact of BE food labeling on purchase intent. Finally, the necessary precautions industry must take to reduce the risk of litigation regarding claims of non-BE (non-GM foods) will be highlighted. This symposium is a must for anyone wanting to learn more about the new labeling regulations for BE foods and how these will impact the industry and consumers.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Update on European and US Regulatory Developments in Nutrition and Health Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    This session will give an update on nutrition and health aspects of regulatory developments in Europe and the United States.
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    Food Engineering, Food Microbiology Ultraviolet Treatment of Beverages: From Theory to Practice Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392
    Ultraviolet (UV) light has been used for decades for disinfecting water, and is broadly applied in Europe and North America. But until recently it has not been adopted for opaque fluids such as liquid foods and beverages. Recently, successful application in juice treatment has demonstrated the feasibility of UV for treating these fluids, and UV technology has started to emerge as a promising non-thermal preservation processes for other beverages. As a non-thermal, non-chemical disinfection technology, UV is anticipated to have minimal effects on product quality, flavor, and nutritive content. UV treatment is effective against food and water borne pathogens, spoilage microflora, spores, and can control pathogen levels to comply with regulatory requirements. The challenge remains that the range of optical and other properties of beverages is extremely broad. Also, each disinfection process may have different microbiological targets, meaning that each UV process has to be developed individually using specific system designs. In each application, three factors must be assessed: the treatment level required for the necessary reduction in target pathogen levels; the impact on product quality; and the regulatory requirements.
     
    Since the challenges of implementing UV are both theoretical and practical, this symposium has been designed as collaboration between academic, government research, and UV industry experts. This symposium will briefly introduce the fundamental principles of UVC light germicidal effects and present approaches for evaluation of product and process parameters in applications of this technology for liquid foods and solid surfaces.
     
    The first focused presentation will address the commercialization of UVC light application for non-thermal pasteurization of water in the dairy industry and requirements for regulatory compliance with the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance that governs the production of Class A dairy products.
     
    The second presentation will discuss UV treatment for beverages with high absorption and scattering properties. The effect of fluid optical properties on achieving required log reduction of food-borne pathogens will be discussed, and inactivation of relevant pathogens will be demonstrated.
     
    The third presentation will discuss the application of UV treatment to milk, in order to inactivate Cronobacter sakazakii. The presenter will discuss results of a feasibility study of UVC light application to reduce Cronobacter sakazakii in milk. The D-values for different strains of Cronobacter sakazakii will be discussed; in addition data on UV dose response curves of different strains of Cronobacter sakazakii will be presented. 
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    Cultural Sensitivity Toward Underrepresented Communities Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
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    Food Processing & Packaging Decoupling Protein Production From Animal and Land Usage: Single Cell Proteins and Macroalgae Nutrient Opportunities Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    To supply a growing world population (reaching 9.1 billion by 2050 according to the FAO) with proteins, we need innovative approaches. To feed the global population, agriculture produces an estimated 525 million tons/year of plant proteins as found in corn, rice, wheat or soybeans of which only 25% goes directly into human nutrition. 60% of these proteins are fed to animals before reaching our fork, losing the 3/4 of these proteins in the animal conversion. This production is both land and animal dependent and carries a heavy environmental burden. In order to mitigate the environmental impact while sustainably supplying proteins, the controlled cultivation and processing of emerging alternative protein sources such as single cells (e.g. microalgae, yeasts) and seaweeds need to be demonstrated as competitive and affordable solutions.
     
    Microalgae are a possible solution to tackle these problems. They can be grown on non-arable land and fixate CO2, if grown photoautotrophically. However, the majority of microalgae based biorefinery concepts are currently not competitive compared to other established production systems. Prof. Mathys will show how abiotic sub-lethal stress induction via nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) treatment might be a viable process to increase the efficiency of microalgae protein production. The combination of nsPEF and µsPEF under certain operating conditions can also be applied to avoid culture crash due to the presence of biological pollutants or facilitate a gentle release of thermosensitive proteins.
     
    The market situation around microalgae also needs to be considered. Three major trends driving the food industry are naturally sourced products, the need to combine health and nutrition claims for food ingredients and an increased preference for environment friendly nutrition sources. Fermentalg’s innovative, sustainable, and cost-effective microalgae production technology fits into the above trends, with a product pipeline addressing three market segments. They will introduce how they oriented their R&D toward mixotrophy to provide a natural pigment to replace chemical blue colorants, and a promising alternative source of functional and nutritional proteins.
     
    Beyond microalgae, the concepts of cellular agriculture i.e. the production of agricultural products from cell cultures of bacteria, yeasts, fungi, animals, and plants, challenge the ways of conventional food production. The technologies have the potential to tackle some of the grand challenges in sustainable food production. In her presentation, Dr. Emilia Nordlund will describe the utilization of cultured plant cells as fresh food, use of microbial organisms for single cell protein and cutting edge technologies enabling feasible large-scale production of functional animal proteins in heterologous expression systems, by fermentation.
     
    Finally, Dr. Balunkeswar Nayak will discuss seaweed protein opportunities. Macroalgae, in particular red and green species, are gaining interest as protein-rich foods (5-45%) for human consumption and sources of proteinaceous bio-functional peptide ingredients. In his presentation, emphasis will be on a case study with dulse (Palmaria palmata) an edible red seaweed, found predominantly in high-latitude coastal areas, contains substantial amount of proteins ranged from 8 to 35% mainly phycobiliproteins. The feasibility of the use of proteins from dulse for high value-added products will be discussed.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Sugar Reduction in Foods: Challenges and Solutions Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273
    Health and wellness continue to be important concerns for consumers, with sugar reduction playing a large role. As public awareness of health increases, more consumers are looking for reduced-sugar and low-calorie alternatives. Reformulating full sugar products for sugar reduction or elimination can pose a number of challenges. Formulators try to build back sweetness by replacing sugar with natural or artificial sweeteners but this can affect the sweetness profile and flavor perception, as well as the body, mouthfeel, and viscosity of food products.
     
    This session will combine the perspective of an academic, a gum and hydrocolloid manufacturer, a flavor manufacturer, and a consumer packaged goods company (CPG) in one symposium. First the scope of sugar reduction will be discussed as it relates to different food applications. In-depth analysis of reduced-sugar, low-sugar, and diet food applications such as beverages, bakery, dairy, and confectionary products will be provided. We will explore each category in additional detail. For example, beverages will be broken into carbonates, flavored water, energy drinks, juice and juice drinks, nectars, RTD teas, and sport drinks. Next, we will cover technical challenges faced by food technologists in reducing sugar. Sensory and rheological data on different food products will showcase changes in food texture, body, and mouthfeel. A flavor company will provide perspective on flavor perception when sugar is removed from a food product. Addition of different gums, hydrocolloids and other carbohydrate-based caloric and non-caloric sweeteners can return lost body, texture, mouthfeel, and flavor perception of reduced-sugar foods. In the third presentation a gum and hydrocolloid manufacturer will provide information on a “complete texture and sweetener system” to make reduced-sugar or diet beverages without compromising texture, sweetness and flavor perception. In the last presentation, we will discuss challenges faced by CPG companies in developing and launching reduced sugar or diet beverages. 
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    Food Processing & Packaging Recent Challenges and Advances in Migration From Packaging Materials Into Foods Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    Packaging has a complemental role in the safety and quality of foods. Different forms of packaging include flexible or rigid, multilayer structures, petroleum-based, or bio-derived materials, or the combination thereof. During the manufacturing of polymeric materials, chemical substances such as plasticizers, antioxidants, slip-agents, inks, and adhesives are utilized to provide functional, aesthetic, and processability features. Such constituents can migrate into the packaged foods as a function of the type of polymer and food, environmental conditions such as temperature and processing effects. In addition, pulp-, glass-, and ceramic-based packaging materials that are traditionally considered inert can include additives and coatings migrating into packaged foods. Since packaging materials are also exposed to varying storage, handling, and processing conditions along with the type of food products, it is important to quantify the migration from safety perspectives due to its direct relation with the public health. For example, Bisphenol A (BPA), widely utilized in polycarbonates and epoxy resins in packages and containers (e.g. tinned-cans) as coatings, was found to migrate into the foods with heat exposure and disrupt the endocrine system causing several health concerns, especially for children and infants. Other examples of such chemicals of concern include phthalate esters, alkylphenols (APs) and di(2-ethyl hexyl) adipate (DEHA), and fluorinated compounds. Even though regulations on migration from food contact materials are available globally, there are distinctions of allowable limits, type of materials, testing simulants, and quantification methods. Many new thermal and non-thermal processing techniques comprising in-package sterilization such as high-pressure processing (HPP) and microwave-assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) have been developed; migratory aspects of substances in such processes need to be addressed.  
     
    This symposium will provide up-to-date information on migration associated with new multilayer structures, petroleum-based, and bio-based materials, process-storage-material interactions, and regulatory activities for food-contact materials. First, an overview will be provided of the retrospective and recent food packaging contaminants, global migration regulations, experimental, and modeling approaches. Second, the migration of substances induced by HPP and HPP at elevated temperatures will be discussed. Finally, mathematical and computer-aided models on the migration of substances from packaging materials to food products and their reliability in predicting migration will be covered. The overall objective of this symposium is to provide the audience with recent information from regulatory, processing, and predictive modeling perspectives of migration from food contact materials into food products.
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    Nonthermal Processing with Light and Plasma: Microbes and Mycotoxins Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285
    Recent technological advances have opened new opportunities for energy-based antimicrobial interventions, with rapid increases in efficacy, power efficiency, and scalability in the context of commercial implementation. In this symposium, leading experts will present the latest research on ultraviolet light, high-intensity LEDs, pulsed light treatments, and cold plasma processing. The current state of the art for each of these technologies will be described, along with key areas of ongoing research for a variety of commodities. This session is co-sponsored by Phi Tau Sigma, the honor society of food science and technology.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Growing Opportunities for Insects as Food Ingredients: New Insights Into Unique Nutritional Benefits Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    Alternative protein sources, gut health, gut microbiome, and nutrition are issues of great interest across the food ingredient space. Insects have recently been recognized as a great potential alternative protein source, but many questions remain. The three most pertinent are “what is the quality of this protein”, “are their other nutritional benefits”, and “is it possible to generate this protein and these benefits in a safe, reliable way”? Research in this field lags the industry by many years, and only recently has evidence begun to accumulate supporting benefits on insect consumption beyond simple protein content.

    This symposium will provide an update on the cutting edge of new developments and integrate insights into the potential of insects as a super-ingredient

    Simple testing on farmed insects provides a strong indicator that there is significant potential of additional benefits beyond access to quality protein. Going beyond this, researchers have identified simple, low-cost environmental manipulations that can radically increase the presence of key nutrients in some insects. However, chemical tests are only a beginning. Researchers out of Iowa state have performed in vivo rat trials assessing the use of different insects as a food to address specific induced nutritional deficiencies. Iron, brain weight, bone mineral content, and lean and fat mass all were improved using different insect-based diets.

    While rat models of nutrition are intriguing, double-blind randomized controlled human trials are obviously the gold standard. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison performed a 6-week RCT involving human consumption of insects. They assessed a broad array of variables related to metabolism, inflammation, and gut health and biota. This study is the first of its kind and shows that incorporating insects into the diet can have significant, unanticipated beneficial effect.

    Finally, the security and stability of the supply chain is the critical infrastructure that ensures quality insect ingredients. Lack of control, either in farming or later in processing, can lead to significant fluctuations in nutritional content and potential health hazards for consumers. However, farming livestock that can weigh a fraction of a gram presents novel challenges not accounted for in traditional farming best practices. Researchers from Aspire Food Group will present a FSMA and NRC-based approach to optimized insect farming with a focus on controlling nutritional quality and microbial activity.
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    IFTNEXT Start-Up Alley Showcase Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Get to know the the companies featured at IFT19's Start-Up Alley
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    Poster Session 5 - Aquatic Food Products; Carbohydrates; Fruit & Vegetable Products; Muscle Foods; Protein Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Hall J
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    Food Chemistry, Food Health & Nutrition Protein Based Nanoparticles as Novel Structure-Building Blocks and Delivery Systems for Bioactives: Functionality, Formation, and Characterization Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396
    Proteins are high molecular weight biopolymers composed of α-L amino acids connected by peptide bonds. Differences in the number, type (aliphatic, aromatic, charged, polar, or non-polar) and sequence of amino acids that form the primary structure of proteins lead to proteins with distinctly different molecular and physicochemical properties. As a result of the endless possible combinations of amino acids, proteins can differ in molecular weight, solubility, flexibility, conformation, polarity, charge, and isoelectric point. These differences provide each protein functional characteristics that will govern the type of interactions with each other or with other molecules in their environment. Such interactions happen through covalent, van der Waals, steric, hydrogen, hydrophobic, and electrostatic molecular interactions. As a result of the differences in properties and interactions, protein nanoparticles can be assembled using various preparation methods, from one or more types of protein, or from a combination of a protein and another type of biopolymer (usually a polysaccharide).
     
    The final characteristics of the nanoparticles are determined by the proteins and/or polysaccharides used, as well as conditions during their fabrication. Techniques that are commonly used in producing protein nanoparticles include antisolvent precipitation, heat set gelation, extrusion/emulsion templating, electrospinning, and formation of soluble complexes or coacervates with oppositely charge biopolymers. Once protein nanoparticles are formed they must be characterized to assess their functionality. Among the most common characterization methods are particle size and morphology and particle charge. On the other hand, in order to characterize the protein nanoparticles composition and physical state, one can employ fluorescence, infrared spectroscopy, or X-ray techniques. Proteins nanoparticles can be suitable for use in food products as structural elements in building novel structures. Using proteins to form structures on a nanoscale level is a promising strategy to improve the stability or organoleptic characteristics of food products, such as flavor, texture, and consistency. Protein nanoparticles can also be used as delivery systems for bioactive compounds that unless encapsulated would not be stable or bioaccessible. This symposium will consist of three presentation focused on the potential to use protein nanoparticles as either building blocks to create novel food structures or delivery systems for control release of bioactives or flavor compounds. The three talks will describe fabrication, characterization and functionality of the different protein-based nanoparticles. A fourth talk will focus on the use of novel techniques such as luminescence spectroscopy to further understand and predict the behavior of proteins during the formation of nanostructures.
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    Food Microbiology, Food Safety & Defense Pet Food Safety: Full Circle Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390
    The pet food industry is one of the fastest growing “food” sectors in the United States. According to the American Pet Products Association in 2017 pet owners in the United States sent $69.51 billion on the pet industry of which $29.07 billion on pet food. Consumers continue to seek out pet food options advertised as “natural,” “raw,” or minimally processed” due to perceived health benefits. At the same time, consumers are worried about food safety of the pet foods they feed their pets. This is due to recent pet food recalls in late 2017 and early 2018. In fact, a recent FDA study sampled 196 raw pet foods and found 15 positive for Salmonella and 32 positive for Listeria monocytogenes. Yet almost none were discovered in dry pet food during the same study. Pet food often is made utilizing a variety of muscle foods including products from the rendering industry. In a survey of muscle foods division members, pet food was the number one symposium topic they wished to see at IFT 2019. Rendering is often a side of the muscle foods industry that does not get discussed, but is a vital part of the industry that offers many products that are utilized to make other products. Products from rendering are often used in pet food. The symposium will also address pet food safety research being conducted in academia as well as an industry perspective on pet food safety.
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    Sustainability An Innovative and Comprehensive Approach to Value Creation From Waste: From Gold Nano Particles to Whey Beer Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385
    With the growing agricultural industry trying to feed the ever-increasing population, the focus has been slowly shifting towards the impact on environment and sustainability, a growing consumer category that places a higher value on sustainable products and concern about where their product comes. In this dynamic consumer base, where trends are influenced by social media, industries are forced to pay attention to sustainability and look for more efficient processing methods and alternative technologies that are more resource friendly and resonate with consumers.
     
    In this symposium we will focus on the consumer trends and drivers that are linked to sustainability and influence purchasing decisions and build a better brand image. We will provide a comprehensive approach on selecting an idea or concept from a consumer need and identifying a solution to address that need, and explore how to successfully commercialize these solutions.
    One of the two issues we focus on is acid whey generated by Greek yogurt manufacturing. This by-product is currently applied in limited amounts to soil, animal feed, anaerobic digesters, and the drain. These nutrients, however, make ideal substrates for microbial fermentations and the talk focus on utilization of acid whey to create value added products.

    The second area of focus explores how chemical and physical methods of nanoparticle synthesis use toxic chemicals in their synthesis protocols. A novel green method to develop gold nanoparticles using agricultural waste materials, such as grape seeds, skin, stalks, and even organic waste generated during the fall season due to the fall of maple leaves and pine needles, to synthesize gold nanoparticle will be presented in this session (AuNP).
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    Sustainability, Food Processing & Packaging Waste to Win: Food Industry R&D Projects Recovering Value From Waste Material Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273
    Management of food waste is an emerging trend driven not only by the economics of food processing, but increasingly, consumer demands for a sustainable food supply and corporate and industry-wide commitments to make our global food system sustainable for generations to come. Success stories within this field can be described by ecosystems that satisfy business models with technologies that work. This symposium will describe marketplace forces for food waste mitigation, the ecosystems that are emerging, and share three new industrial R&D stories describing how successfully applying today’s technology can convert food-waste to a value-added product stream.
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    Food Health & Nutrition, Sensory Science Enter the Matrix: Impact of Food Structure on Health Outcomes and Sensory Perception Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    Dietary guidance is developed to help people meet nutrient needs and limit their intake of certain nutrients, but it does not typically account for how nutrient delivery may vary based on food source. As recently as 2010, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans has recommended limiting total fat intake in the diet to reduce the risk of chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease. However, some foods, including some high in fat, have a different impact on health than would be expected based on their nutrient content. Recent research indicates that the structure of a food, or food matrix, affects the impact of that food on health outcomes and may be responsible for differences between the expected health outcomes linked with a food and its observed impact. Using dairy foods and avocados as case studies, this session explores the importance and feasibility of considering food form as well as nutrient profile in evaluating the health impact of dietary patterns and dietary recommendations. The impact of the food matrix on satiety and sensory perception of these foods will be addressed as well.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods in Sports Nutrition, Muscle Building, and Exercise Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290
    It is well recognized that optimal nutrition, selected nutraceuticals, and functional foods play a critical role in enhancing human performance in sports and exercise activities and overall health. With our growing knowledge of the functioning of human body, changing dietary requirements and recommendations, and rapid advances in the field of drugs and supplements that affect human health and performance, there is a growing need for a comprehensive appraisal of the nutritional benefits in exercise and human health which is addressed in a volume titled “The Nutritional Advantages in Enhanced Human Performance and Exercise.” The present symposium will be divided into four lectures.
     
    The introductory theme in this session is a general overview of the roles of nutrition in human health. This lecture will be focused on reviewing the nutritional prophylaxis in human health including the food exchange values, personalized nutrition, and a critical assessment of antioxidants, nutraceuticals and sports nutrition supplements, micronutrients, and various other nutritional supplements and their influence on human health, sports performance, and exercise. Performance enhancement drugs and selected sports supplements will be covered to address concerns associated with the benefits and potential toxicities of the use of performance-enhancing supplements.
     
    The second lecture will cover intricate aspects of cardiovascular function, resistance training, aerobic and anaerobic exercises, bioenergetics and energy balance, and the nutritional requirements associated with these various fitness programs. This lecture will cover vital features of endurance training, high-altitude sports, winter sports, paralympic games, zero-gravity (space) fitness, and extreme sports such as bungee jumping, hang gliding, sky diving, and sumo wrestling. The benefits of selected nutrients will also be emphasized in this lecture.
     
    The third lecture will cover detailed cellular and molecular mechanism associated with muscle growth, repair, preservation, and its association with physical performance. Intracellular signaling mechanisms, neuromuscular adaptations, and gene regulation topics covered in this section unveil cutting edge progress in molecular biology relating to muscle health. Nitric acid pathophysiology and the role of ATP will be discussed. The pathophysiology of mTOR signaling pathways in myogenesis, muscle hypertrophy, and muscle atrophy will be discussed. Roles of selected nutraceuticals and functional foods in mTOR-dependent muscle growth will be emphasized.
     
    The fourth lecture will provide an exhaustive overview of selected functional foods, minerals, supplements, phytochemicals, amino acids, transition metals, small molecules, and other ergogenic agents that have been implicated in sports nutrition, muscle building, and exercise performance. Doping agents will be briefly covered. Dietary recommendation for sports nutrition, performance athletes, and muscle and body builders will be emphasized. Finally, safety and toxicity issues will be elaborated.
     
    We will address various aspects of sports and nutrition in human health by examining cutting-edge scientific research relating to muscle physiology. By providing a comprehensive review of food and supplements affecting human health and well-being, this session hopes to extend our understanding of the nutritional advantages in enhanced human performance, muscle building, and exercise.
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    Sustainability, Food Engineering CRISPR: Practical Applications and Health Implications Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285
    CRISPR, an acronym for “clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats” is a gene-editing technology that may facilitate the reduction of diseases in humans, plants, and other organisms. A recent review of this technology by the National Academy of Sciences noted that this technology represents possibilities in preventing the transmission of genetically inheritable diseases. This technology may also represent opportunities to ensure and improve the global food supply as the agricultural and scientific communities strive to increase the quality of that food supply to be the needs of a growing population while being attentive to environmental challenges associated with less water, energy, and land. While some argue that the technology may produce genetic errors, thereby additional research is required, others suggest that as we expand our knowledge in bacterial immune systems, the production of non-browning mushrooms, mildew resistant wheat, virtual elimination of respiratory and reproductive diseases among livestock, better tasting fruits and vegetables, and drought-resistant crops may be possible. According to a recent statement by the USDA, the agency does not plan to regulate this technology any differently than traditional hybridization or breeding techniques. This session will outline the possibilities associated with CRISPR technologies, and discuss potential unintended consequences.
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    Teaching & Learning, Food Safety & Defense Enhancing Food Safety Education in Food Science and Engineering Courses Using Simulation Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392
    Customized simulation-based learning can engage learning across multiple disciplines like food science and engineering, without having to be expert in each one. Using the power and flexibility of simulation, we have designed educational modules with embedded “what-if” capabilities. In applying to food safety, the symposium would focus on building, deployment, and assessment of these simulation-based education modules. They have been implemented as a supplement to existing lecture and laboratory courses in 10 universities over a 4-year period as part of a USDA Higher Education Challenge Grant and this symposium is a culmination reporting the findings. These modules cover microbial growth/inactivation, process plus microbiology (retorting and sanitation of biofilm), and risk assessment. Two sets of modules are available, one for the food scientists and one for the engineers. Implemented using a learning management software, they can be accessed by large audiences and are free. We will focus on successes and challenges in a number of areas including setting learning outcomes, pedagogical aspects of module design, software choices, instructor-proof deployment on a large scale, and a financial model for sustaining the effort and assessment.
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    Food Safety & Defense Best Practices for Fraud Prevention in the Global Organic Supply Chain Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-387
    The global organic market has been on a steady rise for more than two decades, and has never been bigger. It is now an almost $90 billion market, with the U.S. organic market alone accounting for close to $50 billion. Organic imports into the United States in 2017 totaled around $2.1 billion, up nearly 25 percent from the previous year. In the past several years, however, investigations have revealed imported products fraudulently labeled as organic and gaps in the complex organic supply chain. Fraud is one of the biggest threats to the organic market, and it cannot be tolerated in the organic system. In May 2017, the Organic Trade Association convened a task force of 48 member companies to develop a fraud prevention program designed specifically for the organic industry. As the first step toward this program, a comprehensive “best practices” guide was created by the task force to facilitate the industry-wide implementation of systems and measures to prevent fraud, both inside and outside of the United States. Following creation of the Guide, the trade association launched a pilot program. The pilot was an intensive-focused exercise in which participants “test drove” in their specific businesses the fraud prevention strategies described in the guide. This session will provide an overview of the finalized best practices guide for fraud prevention and the program organic companies may voluntarily enroll in. You will hear first-hand case studies from pilot project participants, learn about the vulnerabilities that pose the most risk of fraud, and discover an effective mitigation system for improving internal programs to achieve organic integrity throughout your associated supply chains. Participants will also learn what to do when you suspect or detect fraud, and how to file an actionable complaint to USDA’s National Organic Program.

     
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    Food Chemistry Increasing Dairy Protein Hydration: A Fresh Look Using New Age Tools Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    The 2016 Food and Health Survey indicated that protein tops the list of nutrients consumers want to consume (64%). According to the 2017 Innova Insights, global new product launches with protein claims almost doubled since 2014. Food protein ingredients play an integral role in a food product by providing nutrition, taste, and, functionality which are all key for a great consumer experience. We are continuously seeing an increase in the utilization of new generation dairy protein ingredients such as milk protein concentrates and milk protein isolates to deliver the desired nutrition and functionality in food products and help food developers effectively satisfy the current consumer demands for “high protein.” However, the production of high protein foods is sometimes limited by the challenging rehydration characteristics of these ingredients in food formulations. Moreover, a complete hydration of protein powders is imperative to attain their full functionality potential in foods and consequently provide the desired consumer experience. This symposium will highlight emerging cutting-edge techniques to measure the protein hydration behavior and elucidate the mechanism of hydration to better understand the factors that affect the optimal rehydration of dairy protein powders. Furthermore, this session will also uncover current technological innovations to improve rehydration of dairy protein powders.
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    Food Health & Nutrition Healthy Oils at the Center of New Science, New Guidelines, and Personalized Nutrition Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262
    A major shift is occurring as consumers are demanding more personalized options for what they eat. They want validated information on how these foods can benefit their health. Researchers and public policy makers are now upping the evidence standards for setting 2020 dietary guidance and the development of new food products that claim health benefits.
     
    This session will show how new science on specific fatty acids, examined in the context of an individual’s unique genetic and gut signatures, can produce different metabolic consequences. A rapidly growing understanding of epigenetics and of the human microbiome is providing researchers a valuable context to determine why the same food may have different effects in different individuals. The research on fats and oils is out in front of many other areas and Peter Jones, Ph.D, the Canada Research Chair in Functional Foods and Nutrition, will provide many insights on where the science of personalized nutrition is going.
     
    The new 2020–2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans has a restructured process to better focus the abundance of research the science advisory council must review. There will be a review of topics and scientific questions across the life stages as well as from a dietary pattern perspective.  Barbara Schneeman, Ph.D, not only served on the committee assigned to restructure this process, but is the former director of the Office of Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements at FDA. She will provide perspective on how the new process will use good science to strengthen the nation’s dietary recommendations.
     
    Ultimately the industry must meet the growing challenges to produce tasty, diverse products that impart health benefits demanded by consumers. Seed and ingredient innovation plays a key role in making this happen in the world of oils. David Dzisiak, NA Commercial Leader for Grains and Oils at Corteva Agriscience, will share his insights on recent consumer data, as well as how innovation in the industry is meeting the practical challenges for developing a wide array of new, healthier products consumers will enjoy.
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    Food Health & Nutrition, Food Chemistry The Future of Carbohydrate Nutrition: Improving Carbohydrate Quality Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292
    Obesity and diabetes are global epidemics. Increased consumption of refined carbohydrates is one of the contributing factors to these disease conditions. As such, carbohydrates are addressed in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, with specific recommendations to reduce added sugars and include dietary fiber for optimal health. This highlights the importance of carbohydrate quality, demonstrating that carbohydrates have a wide range of physiological impacts. Non-digestible carbohydrates, which include some types of dietary fiber, and slowly digestible carbohydrates are high quality carbohydrates that provide distinct value to food manufacturers to meet consumer trends for weight management and sustained energy.
     
    Non-digestible carbohydrates such as resistant starch (RS) have nutritional and formulation benefits. RS reduces net carbs, lowers glycemic response, and contributes to fewer calories, making food products “better-for-you.” RS also supports gut health through intestinal fermentation and microbiome shifts. Substituting refined flour with resistant starch is a practical way to increase nutritional quality and achieve desirable sensory attributes in finished foods. Different RSes can be produced from various sources (corn, tapioca, potato, rice, etc.) using modifications, to increase value-added nutritional solutions for inclusion in food and beverages.
     
    Consumers are also interested in sustained energy for well-being and quality of life goals such as being more active. Slowly digestible starch (SDS) offers an ingredient solution that improves carbohydrate quality and can be included in a range of food and beverage formats. SDS is caloric, low GI (glycemic index), low-FODMAP, and shown to provide sustained energy. Both RS and SDS provide distinct value when incorporated into a wide range of food and beverage applications satisfying consumer needs. Linking the science with consumer-relevant messaging is essential for educating the public on healthy carbohydrate choices.
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    Professional Development Career Transition: The Art of Switching Roles IFT Central Booth
    Career pathways can take both expected and unexpected turns. Whether you’re ready to transition to a new role, you’ve recently been forced to find a new role, or you’re just curious about how to effectively transition jobs, this session is right for you! Hear from a diverse panel of career professionals about how they successfully transitioned to a new role, both by choice and by force.
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    A Data Quality Deep Dive: Inside Beaver Street Fisheries’ Commitment to Transparency Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Traceability Stage
    When a company is importing more than 100 million pounds of seafood every year from waters throughout the world, it has the potential to drown in product data. Any inaccuracies can lead to ripple effects and errors downstream, at a time when efficiency and transparency must be prioritized to meet consumer expectations. During this presentation, Beaver Street Fisheries (BSF) will discuss how their data quality program has resulted in a wealth of accurate product data that follows each product throughout the supply chain. Through their solid understanding of GS1 Standards and the ability to synchronize product information in real time, BSF has reduced their error rate from 27% to less than 1%.
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    IFTNEXT Accelerate Your Innovation: Using Intellectual Property Data to Drive R&D Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage

    Learn more about how  R&D, IP and business intelligence teams use PatSnap to search and analyze documents—including 130 million patents—containing data on how companies worldwide are innovating. See app or online planner for session description

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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Wed, 11am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Wed, 11:20am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Wed, 11:40am start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Professional Development Renew Your CFS in 3 Easy Steps IFT Central Booth
    Have all your questions answered about the 3 simple steps for maintaining and renewing your CFS and get tips on building a continuing education plan that will benefit both you and your organization.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Wed, 12pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    IFTNEXT Another Food Fusion: Shelf-Stable, Healthy, Convenient Foods in the Global Marketplace Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - IFTNEXT Stage
    Family celebrations, holidays, and special events center on food. Special recipes, indulgence, and enjoyment are center to these occasions. However, routine, day-to-day meal preparation is a challenge in households. Fast food, quick service restaurants, rotisserie chicken and a salad, the grocery deli menu, pre-cut meats and vegetables, and other convenience based foodservice are part of routine family meal plans and are not always healthy-choice options. Healthier food choices lead to reduced incidences of chronic health. Shelf-stable, ready-to-eat, portion sized packages, combined with agitating batch retort technology can play a larger role in healthier food choices. The center of the aisle should be part of the conversation of foods for health. Packaging and product positioning influence consumer choice. Combined with consumer insights research to identify what shoppers want, messages that resonate with consumers can be uncovered with conjoint analysis, to craft powerful packaging and marketing claims for innovative, healthier food products.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Wed, 12:20pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Professional Development Upcycled Ingredients: A Way to Reduce the Impact on the Planet, Fight Feed Insecurity, and Make Our Bodies Healthier IFT Central Booth
    The multi-year journey that the team at Planetarians has taken up to this point has taken many twists and turns. What started as a nutritional beverage became a popular snack chip before finally landing at the upcycled ingredient model. Along the way, the founder never took his eyes off his goal of improving the global food supply chain through his company. In this discussion, Aleh will take the audience through challenges and benefits of upcycling solid food waste into nutritions ingredients. Showcase current applications (like a black protein pasta and complete set of 2000 cal under $1) and invite everyone to take it further offering free samples.
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    IFTNEXT Using Robotics for Safe and Sustainable Food Production IFTNEXT Stage
    Safe and sustainable food production is an issue that every person on the planet should care about. Agriculture in the 21st century faces the challenge of producing more food to feed a growing population, with a smaller rural labor force. Over the past few years, we have seen a significant reduction in the availability of labor for produce and other food production markets. As a result, the cost of food has risen while the supply of food around the world has diminished. At the same time, governments are upgrading standards on sanitary requirements to ensure safe production of food. Rather than respond to food borne contamination outbreaks, how can we prevent it? Automation is an answer to both the labor crisis and food safety conundrum that place a burden on food production. Learn how automation across the entire food supply chain can lead to safe and sustainable food production that will feed the world, and ensure economic viability for farmers.
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    Virtual Reality Tasting Experience (Wed, 1pm start) Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - Behind IFTNEXT Stage

    Can one's environment influence your perception of flavor?  In this interactive ticketed event, participants will be immersed in different virtual environments to test whether one's surroundings can alter your experience of food. Get a behind the scenes look at how one research team has developed and easy-to-implement and affordable method for adapting virtual reality technology for use in food sensory evaluation. Come to be inspired!

     

    *IMPORTANT NOTE* THE TIME SELECTED FOR THIS EVENT IS NOT TRANSFERABLE.

     

    Allergy and Epilepsy Statement

    This virtual reality experience may include flashing or moving lights which may affect those susceptible to motion sickness, photosensitive epilepsy or other photo-sensitivities

     

    Registration and Ticket required to enter the event.  We strongly encourage you to purchase your tickets in advance.  $15/person.
    Click here to register for this event!

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    Food Health & Nutrition New Cannabis Frontiers in Public Health, Medical Science, and Food Safety Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277
    After a thirty-five-year War on Drugs, cannabis marijuana (Cannabis sativa) is legalized for personal or recreational use in 30 states and the District of Columbia (State Marijuana Laws). Marijuana, known on the street by more than 200 names, is a schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act (1970), which is enforced by the Drug Enforcement Administration. It should be noted that two cannabis containing drugs have been approved by the FDA and that other components of marijuana may show promise for treating medical conditions including chronic pain, muscle spasms, seizure disorders, and nausea from cancer chemotherapy. However, a food containing marijuana is considered adulterated as defined under U.S. food regulations (21 CFR 342).
     
    Despite these regulatory dynamics, food products that contain marijuana with its vast array of psychoactive and non-psychoactive substances represent approximately 10 percent of the total U.S. cannabis market, which is nearly $5 billion and escalating daily. In addition, many analytical challenges remain in order to accurately assess the content of food products that contain THC and related cannabinoids. Recent reports indicate many cannabis-containing food products are out of compliance in many aspects when applied to the normal food supply. Yet, a recent GRAS affirmation of CBD may represent the regulatory and safety beginning of future applications in foods and dietary supplements.
     
    The pharmacokinetics of the various cannabinoids, such as THC, and the associated terpenes, differ based on route of administration, such as inhalation or oral ingestion. For example, inhalation of THC may produce psychotropic effects within seconds to a few minutes, whereas those effects are typically delayed 60-90 minutes post ingestion and in addition, may be amplified following oral consumption. Most importantly, cannabis yields over 770 chemical compounds, many of which are less than well-characterized, and for which no safety data are available. Furthermore, only limited toxicological evaluations have been conducted via oral administration.
     
    Yet, these kinds of food products are readily available but without traditional safety assessment, clinical substantiation, or regulatory compliance. There is a desperate need to better understand how exposure via various routes of administration, including oral through marijuana edibles and especially during the developmental teen years, influences brain development and brain injury. The legalization of marijuana may prove to be of significant political and social benefit, but the medical impact of readily available and potent edible forms of this plant must be better understood and approached with utmost care and caution.
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    Food Health & Nutrition A Holistic Approach to Sugar Reduction in Food and Beverage Applications Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268
    With the continued emphasis on sugar content in foods, consumers are demanding more sugar reduction across all food categories. Governments around the globe are adding more pressure by implementing food labels to highlight the amount of sugar on front of the packs or listed specifically as “added sugars” on the nutritional labels. Because of these emerging demands, food scientists around the world are looking into developing and commercializing novel sweetener systems that can not only provide sweetness but also other key attributes, such as texture, shelf life, clean/consumer friendly label, and various other specific characteristics needed from the typical products.
     
    The initial presentation of this session will highlight the latest trends in sugar reduction and consumer perception over various ingredient solutions. The subsequent presentations will focus on sugar reduction in three application areas; dairy, chocolate and sweet baked goods. The speakers will outline the key challenges when it comes to replacing sugar and ingredient and/or formulation solutions are available to overcome these challenges. Each presentation will also demonstrate case studies to help illustrate how ingredients alone or in combination can address the challenges of sugar reduction in the different application categories.