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Food Health & Nutrition

11 - 20 Results out of 39
Planting the Microbiome: The Impact of Plant-Derived Exosome-Like Nanoparticles on the Gut Microbiome and Intestinal Homeostasis

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 02:30 PM - 03:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Ingestion by distinct gut microbes of exosome-like nanoparticles containing bioactive components can result in differential microbial gene expression that can contribute to host health.  This interkingdom communication between plant, microbe and host provides compelling approaches toward the development of precision tools aimed at health-directed dietary interventions for consumers.
Parallels Among the Microbial Diversity in Fermented Vegetables and the Human Gut and Potential Applications in Food and Beverage Products

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 02:00 PM - 02:30 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

This session will provide background on glycoscience and the role of glyco structures in cell-cell communication, also involved in the cross-kingdom communication system to develop i.e., a potentially mutualistic, commensalistic or parasitic interaction. The innate immune system in mammals is an older evolutionary defense strategy, relatively speaking, and also it is the dominant immune system response found in plants, fungi, insects, and primitive multicellular eukaryote organisms.  Therefore, it is not surprising to have analog immune responses to secondary metabolites of plants, stimulating our innate immune cells. Research is revealing the molecular mechanism and the role of some dietary functional sugars in potentially improving the cellular communication with the gut microbiota. Advances in research is creating novel marketing opportunities for gut health, to potentially prevent the large number of specific health challenges arising from microbiota imbalance.
Secondary Metabolites in the Control of Microbiota and Immunity: Functional Sugars

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 01:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

This session will provide background on glycoscience and the role of glyco structures in cell-cell communication, also involved in the cross-kingdom communication system to develop i.e., a potentially mutualistic, commensalistic or parasitic interaction. The innate immune system in mammals is an older evolutionary defense strategy, relatively speaking, and also it is the dominant immune system response found in plants, fungi, insects, and primitive multicellular eukaryote organisms.  Therefore, it is not surprising to have analog immune responses to secondary metabolites of plants, stimulating our innate immune cells. Research is revealing the molecular mechanism and the role of some dietary functional sugars in potentially improving the cellular communication with the gut microbiota. Advances in research is creating novel marketing opportunities for gut health, to potentially prevent the large number of specific health challenges arising from microbiota imbalance.
Dietary Fiber Structure Controls on Gut Microbiome Composition and Function

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 12:15 PM - 01:30 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Dr. Bruce Hamaker will provide context for how food carbohydrates interact with the gut microbiota to influence human nutrition and health. He will emphasize the impact of the interaction between gut microbiota and specific carbohydrate structures on human physiology, that stem from the tripartite interaction of carbohydrates, microbiota, and human physiology. Dr. Lindemann will address how carbohydrate structures, including fine structural variants, can have targeted impacts on certain species and genotypes within human gut microbiota, and the degree to which carbohydrate structure governs the composition and metabolism of microbiota. Further, this session will explore the idea that carbohydrates can be designed and blended to feed certain populations and control metabolic and health outcomes. The goal of the session is to provide context for the emerging use of carbohydrate structures in foods as a set of tools to manipulate the gut ecosystem toward improved health.
The Patent Landscape: The Gut Microbiome

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 03:45 PM - 04:15 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Patent activity in the food and beverage field is booming. This team will share its view of attempts to patent in the field of the gut microbiome (i.e. food, nutrition, diet, health), and what that means for you from a business and strategy perspective. We’ll explore the state of the art of the gut microbiome through the lens of patent activity. We’ll highlight major technologies, companies, and inventors. The patent landscape process may help you to identify research and business trends, potential research partners and collaborators, acquisition targets, and competitive threats. This patent landscape may also explore the use of human gut microbiome for therapeutic application in area of gastrointestinal diseases. Microbiome-based therapeutic approaches may be reviewed, including fecal transplants and selected novel therapies.
Microbiome Deep Dive Welcome

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Food and Nutrition Security and Sustainability: Science, Technology, and Policy

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 01:00 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

With the challenges we face in meeting the food and nutrition needs of our rapidly increasing population in an environmentally sustainable way, it is imperative that we step up dialogue and interdisciplinary research and development; catalyze and implement solution-oriented innovations with speed and urgency; and drive policy changes to effect the needed transformations in our global food supply chains. This program convenes experts from multiple disciplines in the food system to discuss advances in gene-related techniques and other technologies and developments being pursued to enhance agricultural outcomes, food loss and waste reduction, and drive sustainability. How global food trade, politics and policy interplay will also be addressed.
Growing Opportunities for Insects as Food Ingredients: New Insights Into Unique Nutritional Benefits

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268

Alternative protein sources, gut health, gut microbiome, and nutrition are issues of great interest across the food ingredient space. Insects have recently been recognized as a great potential alternative protein source, but many questions remain. The three most pertinent are “what is the quality of this protein”, “are their other nutritional benefits”, and “is it possible to generate this protein and these benefits in a safe, reliable way”? Research in this field lags the industry by many years, and only recently has evidence begun to accumulate supporting benefits on insect consumption beyond simple protein content.

This symposium will provide an update on the cutting edge of new developments and integrate insights into the potential of insects as a super-ingredient

Simple testing on farmed insects provides a strong indicator that there is significant potential of additional benefits beyond access to quality protein. Going beyond this, researchers have identified simple, low-cost environmental manipulations that can radically increase the presence of key nutrients in some insects. However, chemical tests are only a beginning. Researchers out of Iowa state have performed in vivo rat trials assessing the use of different insects as a food to address specific induced nutritional deficiencies. Iron, brain weight, bone mineral content, and lean and fat mass all were improved using different insect-based diets.

While rat models of nutrition are intriguing, double-blind randomized controlled human trials are obviously the gold standard. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison performed a 6-week RCT involving human consumption of insects. They assessed a broad array of variables related to metabolism, inflammation, and gut health and biota. This study is the first of its kind and shows that incorporating insects into the diet can have significant, unanticipated beneficial effect.

Finally, the security and stability of the supply chain is the critical infrastructure that ensures quality insect ingredients. Lack of control, either in farming or later in processing, can lead to significant fluctuations in nutritional content and potential health hazards for consumers. However, farming livestock that can weigh a fraction of a gram presents novel challenges not accounted for in traditional farming best practices. Researchers from Aspire Food Group will present a FSMA and NRC-based approach to optimized insect farming with a focus on controlling nutritional quality and microbial activity.
Healthy Oils at the Center of New Science, New Guidelines, and Personalized Nutrition

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262

A major shift is occurring as consumers are demanding more personalized options for what they eat. They want validated information on how these foods can benefit their health. Researchers and public policy makers are now upping the evidence standards for setting 2020 dietary guidance and the development of new food products that claim health benefits.
 
This session will show how new science on specific fatty acids, examined in the context of an individual’s unique genetic and gut signatures, can produce different metabolic consequences. A rapidly growing understanding of epigenetics and of the human microbiome is providing researchers a valuable context to determine why the same food may have different effects in different individuals. The research on fats and oils is out in front of many other areas and Peter Jones, Ph.D, the Canada Research Chair in Functional Foods and Nutrition, will provide many insights on where the science of personalized nutrition is going.
 
The new 2020–2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans has a restructured process to better focus the abundance of research the science advisory council must review. There will be a review of topics and scientific questions across the life stages as well as from a dietary pattern perspective.  Barbara Schneeman, Ph.D, not only served on the committee assigned to restructure this process, but is the former director of the Office of Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements at FDA. She will provide perspective on how the new process will use good science to strengthen the nation’s dietary recommendations.
 
Ultimately the industry must meet the growing challenges to produce tasty, diverse products that impart health benefits demanded by consumers. Seed and ingredient innovation plays a key role in making this happen in the world of oils. David Dzisiak, NA Commercial Leader for Grains and Oils at Corteva Agriscience, will share his insights on recent consumer data, as well as how innovation in the industry is meeting the practical challenges for developing a wide array of new, healthier products consumers will enjoy.
The Future of Carbohydrate Nutrition: Improving Carbohydrate Quality

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

Obesity and diabetes are global epidemics. Increased consumption of refined carbohydrates is one of the contributing factors to these disease conditions. As such, carbohydrates are addressed in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, with specific recommendations to reduce added sugars and include dietary fiber for optimal health. This highlights the importance of carbohydrate quality, demonstrating that carbohydrates have a wide range of physiological impacts. Non-digestible carbohydrates, which include some types of dietary fiber, and slowly digestible carbohydrates are high quality carbohydrates that provide distinct value to food manufacturers to meet consumer trends for weight management and sustained energy.
 
Non-digestible carbohydrates such as resistant starch (RS) have nutritional and formulation benefits. RS reduces net carbs, lowers glycemic response, and contributes to fewer calories, making food products “better-for-you.” RS also supports gut health through intestinal fermentation and microbiome shifts. Substituting refined flour with resistant starch is a practical way to increase nutritional quality and achieve desirable sensory attributes in finished foods. Different RSes can be produced from various sources (corn, tapioca, potato, rice, etc.) using modifications, to increase value-added nutritional solutions for inclusion in food and beverages.
 
Consumers are also interested in sustained energy for well-being and quality of life goals such as being more active. Slowly digestible starch (SDS) offers an ingredient solution that improves carbohydrate quality and can be included in a range of food and beverage formats. SDS is caloric, low GI (glycemic index), low-FODMAP, and shown to provide sustained energy. Both RS and SDS provide distinct value when incorporated into a wide range of food and beverage applications satisfying consumer needs. Linking the science with consumer-relevant messaging is essential for educating the public on healthy carbohydrate choices.