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Food Health & Nutrition

21 - 30 Results out of 39
Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods in Sports Nutrition, Muscle Building, and Exercise

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

It is well recognized that optimal nutrition, selected nutraceuticals, and functional foods play a critical role in enhancing human performance in sports and exercise activities and overall health. With our growing knowledge of the functioning of human body, changing dietary requirements and recommendations, and rapid advances in the field of drugs and supplements that affect human health and performance, there is a growing need for a comprehensive appraisal of the nutritional benefits in exercise and human health which is addressed in a volume titled “The Nutritional Advantages in Enhanced Human Performance and Exercise.” The present symposium will be divided into four lectures.
 
The introductory theme in this session is a general overview of the roles of nutrition in human health. This lecture will be focused on reviewing the nutritional prophylaxis in human health including the food exchange values, personalized nutrition, and a critical assessment of antioxidants, nutraceuticals and sports nutrition supplements, micronutrients, and various other nutritional supplements and their influence on human health, sports performance, and exercise. Performance enhancement drugs and selected sports supplements will be covered to address concerns associated with the benefits and potential toxicities of the use of performance-enhancing supplements.
 
The second lecture will cover intricate aspects of cardiovascular function, resistance training, aerobic and anaerobic exercises, bioenergetics and energy balance, and the nutritional requirements associated with these various fitness programs. This lecture will cover vital features of endurance training, high-altitude sports, winter sports, paralympic games, zero-gravity (space) fitness, and extreme sports such as bungee jumping, hang gliding, sky diving, and sumo wrestling. The benefits of selected nutrients will also be emphasized in this lecture.
 
The third lecture will cover detailed cellular and molecular mechanism associated with muscle growth, repair, preservation, and its association with physical performance. Intracellular signaling mechanisms, neuromuscular adaptations, and gene regulation topics covered in this section unveil cutting edge progress in molecular biology relating to muscle health. Nitric acid pathophysiology and the role of ATP will be discussed. The pathophysiology of mTOR signaling pathways in myogenesis, muscle hypertrophy, and muscle atrophy will be discussed. Roles of selected nutraceuticals and functional foods in mTOR-dependent muscle growth will be emphasized.
 
The fourth lecture will provide an exhaustive overview of selected functional foods, minerals, supplements, phytochemicals, amino acids, transition metals, small molecules, and other ergogenic agents that have been implicated in sports nutrition, muscle building, and exercise performance. Doping agents will be briefly covered. Dietary recommendation for sports nutrition, performance athletes, and muscle and body builders will be emphasized. Finally, safety and toxicity issues will be elaborated.
 
We will address various aspects of sports and nutrition in human health by examining cutting-edge scientific research relating to muscle physiology. By providing a comprehensive review of food and supplements affecting human health and well-being, this session hopes to extend our understanding of the nutritional advantages in enhanced human performance, muscle building, and exercise.
NMR Applications in Food Science and Nutrition

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 07:45 AM - 08:45 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

Despite the increasing popularity of NMR spectroscopy among food scientists, it is still an underutilized methodology in this field, mainly due to the lack of expertise by many food scientists. In this session we will try to bridge the knowledge gap that may exist when attempting to apply NMR techniques in food science and nutrition. We will cover the basic principles required to apply NMR on the study of foods, nutrients, and biological fluids. A brief description of chemometrics will be provided. Finally, an overview of recent and key applications in the areas of compositional analysis, food authentication, quality control, and human nutrition will be presented.
Protein Based Nanoparticles as Novel Structure-Building Blocks and Delivery Systems for Bioactives: Functionality, Formation, and Characterization

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Proteins are high molecular weight biopolymers composed of α-L amino acids connected by peptide bonds. Differences in the number, type (aliphatic, aromatic, charged, polar, or non-polar) and sequence of amino acids that form the primary structure of proteins lead to proteins with distinctly different molecular and physicochemical properties. As a result of the endless possible combinations of amino acids, proteins can differ in molecular weight, solubility, flexibility, conformation, polarity, charge, and isoelectric point. These differences provide each protein functional characteristics that will govern the type of interactions with each other or with other molecules in their environment. Such interactions happen through covalent, van der Waals, steric, hydrogen, hydrophobic, and electrostatic molecular interactions. As a result of the differences in properties and interactions, protein nanoparticles can be assembled using various preparation methods, from one or more types of protein, or from a combination of a protein and another type of biopolymer (usually a polysaccharide).
 
The final characteristics of the nanoparticles are determined by the proteins and/or polysaccharides used, as well as conditions during their fabrication. Techniques that are commonly used in producing protein nanoparticles include antisolvent precipitation, heat set gelation, extrusion/emulsion templating, electrospinning, and formation of soluble complexes or coacervates with oppositely charge biopolymers. Once protein nanoparticles are formed they must be characterized to assess their functionality. Among the most common characterization methods are particle size and morphology and particle charge. On the other hand, in order to characterize the protein nanoparticles composition and physical state, one can employ fluorescence, infrared spectroscopy, or X-ray techniques. Proteins nanoparticles can be suitable for use in food products as structural elements in building novel structures. Using proteins to form structures on a nanoscale level is a promising strategy to improve the stability or organoleptic characteristics of food products, such as flavor, texture, and consistency. Protein nanoparticles can also be used as delivery systems for bioactive compounds that unless encapsulated would not be stable or bioaccessible. This symposium will consist of three presentation focused on the potential to use protein nanoparticles as either building blocks to create novel food structures or delivery systems for control release of bioactives or flavor compounds. The three talks will describe fabrication, characterization and functionality of the different protein-based nanoparticles. A fourth talk will focus on the use of novel techniques such as luminescence spectroscopy to further understand and predict the behavior of proteins during the formation of nanostructures.
United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 2: Achieving Zero Hunger by Reducing Food Waste, Improving Food Security, and Developing Innovations in Food Science

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-386

Already over two billion people worldwide are affected by some form of food insecurity such as malnutrition or poverty. Furthermore, the world population is projected to grow to 9 billion by 2050, while urbanization is set to increase by 78%. The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018” (FAO) states that the number of hungry people is on the rise already today. While a great deal of attention is paid to improve the quality, production and delivery of food, an oft neglected aspect is preventing food loss as it makes its way from the producer to the consumer. Nearly one third of all food produced for human consumption is lost before it makes its way to the consumer. Global food supply chain losses are substantial, and amidst talk of having to increase food production significantly to meet growing demands, there appears to be a gap to identify how much food is lost and wasted and how we can prevent these food losses. Reducing this loss will not only have a direct impact on hunger by increasing the available supply of food, it will have several indirect economic and environmental benefits that can be observed throughout the food value chain. 

Another aspect of achieving zero hunger, is solving “hidden hunger” or malnutrition. It is often the case that even when adequate food reaches a population, the proper nutrition is lacking. Finding the means to deliver proper and often specialized nutrients to large target populations is a vital technology in the fight against global hunger. This requires transformational thinking and innovation some examples of which will be introduced in this session.

Lastly, this session also aims at providing clarity on how interested food technologists could participate either remotely or locally in the various programs managed by UN food agencies. This is a first collective step between these organizations and IFT to find avenues to identify food technology capabilities and resources that can contribute to the strengthening of capacities of local communities that these organizations assist.

There do not exist clear venues for food technology professionals to contribute their expertise and collaborate with multilateral organizations in projects either remotely or locally. For example, WFP feeds 80 million people annually with only a staff of 20 food technologists contributing to the development, distribution and management of the safety and quality of food value chains in some of the planet’s most remote and insecure regions. We hope to bring awareness of the demand for food technologists in these vital sectors so we would have the talent necessary to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger. 
Enter the Matrix: Impact of Food Structure on Health Outcomes and Sensory Perception

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268

Dietary guidance is developed to help people meet nutrient needs and limit their intake of certain nutrients, but it does not typically account for how nutrient delivery may vary based on food source. As recently as 2010, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans has recommended limiting total fat intake in the diet to reduce the risk of chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease. However, some foods, including some high in fat, have a different impact on health than would be expected based on their nutrient content. Recent research indicates that the structure of a food, or food matrix, affects the impact of that food on health outcomes and may be responsible for differences between the expected health outcomes linked with a food and its observed impact. Using dairy foods and avocados as case studies, this session explores the importance and feasibility of considering food form as well as nutrient profile in evaluating the health impact of dietary patterns and dietary recommendations. The impact of the food matrix on satiety and sensory perception of these foods will be addressed as well.
Update on European and US Regulatory Developments in Nutrition and Health

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

This session will give an update on nutrition and health aspects of regulatory developments in Europe and the United States.
Healthy Fats: Oleogels as Replacements for Saturated and Trans Fats

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-386

This session is a joint session between the Food Chemistry division and the Dairy Foods division of IFT. “Healthy fat” has been identified as a priority topic in the 2019 IFT Annual Meeting for these divisions. Oleogel (or organogel) technology has been recognized as one of the most promising technologies to replace saturated/trans fats used in many food products such as margarine, spread, shortening, ice cream, icing, and chocolate. Typical edible oleogels consist of a small amount of an edible oleogelator and vegetable oil. Properties of an oleogel are very similar to those of conventional fats containing high contents of saturated and/or trans fats. The interest in oleogels, as indicated by the number of publications, has dramatically increased over the last decade due to the need for alternatives to saturated/trans fats. This session will focus on the most recent advances in this technology and future directions.
Meat Hybrids and Analogs: Product Trends, Research, and Nutrition

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273

Historically, protein advancements have primarily focused on animal based muscle, milk, and eggs. However in recent years, consumers increasing curiosity into protein heavy diets and concern for food manufacturing processes has fueled the development of all protein sources, especially alternatives to animal-based. This rapid development of alternative meat-like and plant-based protein alternatives in the recent decade has drastically shifted the light in which protein is now viewed, researched, and consumed. Plant-based protein inclusion into traditionally meat-centric meals and eating habits is not a new concept, nor is inclusion of plant fibers into processed meats; but, deliberately enhancing processed meats with plant proteins, or hybridizing, is emerging. Development of meat-like analogs and, subsequently, meat-plant hybrids has exploded as a result. Major restaurant chains have been adding alternative proteins to menus for a few years now, but recently hybrids are also starting to gain popularity as well. Research shows that inclusion of plant fibers and proteins can standardize and benefit the nutritional value and functionality of processed meats. Processing advancements in the industry have greatly improved the eating experience of meatless analogs by better improving texture and flavor and meat-plant hybrids and analogs serve to marry and amplify the best components of plant and animal ingredients. Developing a deeper understanding of the role meat-plant hybrids in the rapidly changing protein market will provide tools for food scientists and industry experts to push the envelope of protein product and process developments. This session is a collaboration between IFT's Muscle Foods Division, Protein Division and Phi Tau Sigma.
Integrity and Innovation in Probiotic Formulation

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 07:45 AM - 08:45 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center 283-285

Consumer acceptance of probiotics has grown rapidly over the past few years and the market for probiotics consumed by humans is estimated at $6.8 billion in 2018 with a CAGR of 8.3%, leading to a value of $12.7 billion in 2026. The total probiotics industry is predicted grow to an expected value of $64 billion by 2022 with a CAGR of ~7.0% from 2017-2022. The currently accepted definition of probiotics, proposed by a working group of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO), is: “live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host”. For consumers and suppliers alike, the key concerns are: (1) what health benefits and which microorganisms provide them; (2) how do I know that there is an “adequate amount” still alive at the end of shelf life, and; (3) how do I know which microorganisms are present and possibly at what relative concentrations in a blend. This symposium will address all three questions with examples of current best practices and leading-edge technologies.
 
Sugar Reduction in Foods: Challenges and Solutions

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273

Health and wellness continue to be important concerns for consumers, with sugar reduction playing a large role. As public awareness of health increases, more consumers are looking for reduced-sugar and low-calorie alternatives. Reformulating full sugar products for sugar reduction or elimination can pose a number of challenges. Formulators try to build back sweetness by replacing sugar with natural or artificial sweeteners but this can affect the sweetness profile and flavor perception, as well as the body, mouthfeel, and viscosity of food products.
 
This session will combine the perspective of an academic, a gum and hydrocolloid manufacturer, a flavor manufacturer, and a consumer packaged goods company (CPG) in one symposium. First the scope of sugar reduction will be discussed as it relates to different food applications. In-depth analysis of reduced-sugar, low-sugar, and diet food applications such as beverages, bakery, dairy, and confectionary products will be provided. We will explore each category in additional detail. For example, beverages will be broken into carbonates, flavored water, energy drinks, juice and juice drinks, nectars, RTD teas, and sport drinks. Next, we will cover technical challenges faced by food technologists in reducing sugar. Sensory and rheological data on different food products will showcase changes in food texture, body, and mouthfeel. A flavor company will provide perspective on flavor perception when sugar is removed from a food product. Addition of different gums, hydrocolloids and other carbohydrate-based caloric and non-caloric sweeteners can return lost body, texture, mouthfeel, and flavor perception of reduced-sugar foods. In the third presentation a gum and hydrocolloid manufacturer will provide information on a “complete texture and sweetener system” to make reduced-sugar or diet beverages without compromising texture, sweetness and flavor perception. In the last presentation, we will discuss challenges faced by CPG companies in developing and launching reduced sugar or diet beverages.