content tagged as Product Development

11 - 20 Results out of 40
Formulating With Dairy and Non-Dairy Proteins

When: Monday, 01/01/0001 through Monday, 01/01/0001, 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Where:

According to Mintel, expansion of product offerings that emphasize plants as key ingredients is among the top six global food and drink trends for 2017. Food scientists now have a host of dairy and non-dairy ingredients to select for formulation of new products. Product development requires an understanding of consumer perception, opportunities, and challenges with each of the ingredients. This seminar will include a representative from Mintel to cover data on dairy and non-dairy product launches, consumer perception of non-dairy, and opportunities within the category. A representative from a dairy ingredient supplier will provide information on the types of dairy proteins, applications, methods for assessing functionality, and opportunities for innovation. Finally, a representative from a large food company will share an overview of the challenges in formulating with plant proteins in a variety of products and how ingredient manufacturers can work with food companies to support innovation.
Establishing the Safety of Cellulose Nanomaterials for Food Related Uses

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Nanocellulose research is a topic of increasing interest in multiple fields due to its unique physical properties derived from their nanoscale size such as the high viscosity. However, the use of nanocellulose in food applications has not been approved by regulatory agencies due to questions about its safety and health implications. This session will cover up-to-date information in processing and characteristics of nanomaterials, their behavior in the human GI tract, and the results of toxicity studies. The session will also discuss ongoing and future studies required for regulatory agencies to approve nanocellulose for use in food related applications.
From Lab to Fork: The Emergence of Cellular Agriculture

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

“Cellular agriculture,” the ability to produce agricultural products, such as meat, eggs, and milk through the use of biotechnology and cell culture and without the use of animals per se, is being touted as the next big breakthrough for ensuring a sustainable, safe, and ethical food supply. Meats produced via cellular agriculture have been given various monikers such as “cultured meats,” “animal-free meats,” “clean meats,” and “lab-grown meats,” to name a few. As this field of research emerges, it is conceivable that these cultured products could become commercially available in the near future. What are some of the regulatory challenges that will be faced by companies wanting to bring these products to market?

The market introduction of products developed via cellular agriculture poses a myriad of questions from a regulatory perspective. For example, what level of regulatory oversight will be needed? How will it be ensured that these products are safe? Will these products have to be nutritionally equivalent to their conventionally-obtained counterparts? How will they be labelled? When genetically modified (GM) foods were first developed and brought to market, existing regulations had to be adapted and new regulations had to be promulgated and, in some jurisdictions, GM foods continue to be contentious. Similar developments are likely to be needed for the commercialization of products obtained via cellular agriculture.

This symposium will begin with an overview of cellular agriculture: what it is, and the methods and technologies used to develop cultured animal products. The stakeholders involved in advancing the research and development of cultured animal products will be shared, in addition to the challenges associated with the progress of research in this area. Whether the existing regulatory framework in the United States for bringing food products to market can be adapted to support the commercialization of cultured animal products will be discussed, in addition to foreseen regulatory challenges.
Solving Formulation Challenges With Plant-Based Dairy Alternatives

When: Monday, 01/01/0001 through Monday, 01/01/0001, 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Where:

Alternative dairy products are seen as beneficial to consumers for a number of reasons including environmental impact, allergens, overall health, and vegetarian lifestyle choices. However, there are specific challenges and concerns that must be addressed in developing and formulating a nutritious and organoleptically acceptable alternative dairy product. Some of these concerns will be addressed in this symposium, including: (1) nutritional and regulatory concerns, (2) texture gaps and (3)fermentation/culturing challenges. Alternative dairy products encompass a wide range of food products that are derived from plant-based sources such as legume, nuts, grains, and seeds that have been developed to have similar taste, texture and appearance as dairy-based products. They come in forms ranging from milk-like beverages, cultured yogurts, frozen desserts or vegan cheese. Despite concerns from consumers towards dairy products, dairy products are powerful nutritional vehicles that contain important nutrients such as complete protein, calcium, and vitamins. Replacing dairy constitutes a challenge to develop a product that has a similar nutrient package as a real dairy product.

Nutritional aspects of formulating an alternative dairy product will be discussed by Dr. Christopher Marinangeli, Director of Nutrition, Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, Pulse Canada. He will discuss the nutritional attributes of plant-based diets, including, nutritional adequacy or risk of inadequacy, and chronic disease. The presentation will also discuss the regulatory challenges in North America, particularly with plant-based protein, which can affect the ability to communicate the nutritional attributes of plant-based protein to consumers. Another challenge involves product texture. Dairy components are highly functional ingredients as they contribute unique functionality such as gelling, viscosity, and mouthfeel in dairy products. Removing these ingredients will result in a product that is low in gel strength, lacks mouthfeel and may be powdery. Ingredient strategies to build back and optimize texture in alternative dairy products that has a similar texture to traditional dairy products will be shown by Hanna Clune, Senior Food Technologist at Ingredion. Finally, developing cultured alternative products represents a unique challenge from a fermentation perspective. Dr. Mirjana Curic-Bawden from Chr. Hansen will discuss culture requirements for developing a vegan dairy product and some of the challenges associated with it. This symposium will allow the audience to understand the challenges associated with developing vegan dairy products as well as strategies and tools for overcoming these challenges.
Current Nutritional Trends in Immune and Gut Health

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S405AB

Diet influences the immune response of individual both systemically and in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The effects of various dietary components on immune response continue to be studied and advances made. The effect of immune-active components on immune function can be measured by changes in the quantity and biological activity of numerous immune biomarkers. The impact of dietary interventions and additives (e.g. probiotics) on immune response are a current topic in nutrition research. It is possible to use functional food components to modulate immune response and support systemic and digestive health of the general population.

The symposia will examine this topic from three different perspectives: (1) current research into the immune response of PUFA ingredients in the diet, (2) the science supporting probiotic effects on immune response, and (3) an evaluation of the science supporting commercially available food ingredients affecting systemic and GIT immune response. Inclusion of key ingredients in the diet such as PUFA’s, prebiotic fibers and probiotics have been shown to modulate the immune response both systemically and in the GIT. The key message to be presented is that inclusion of select ingredients in functional foods can have a measurable, beneficial effect on the immune response of generally healthy people.
Characterizing Key Attributes of Various Proteins in Food Applications

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 08:00 AM - 09:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

In recent years protein has become the most important and preferred ingredient by all consumer segments. According to a Food and Health survey conducted by the International Food Information Council (2016), protein tops the list of nutrients people want to consume. In the past two years there has been an increase of about 63% in new products with some kind of protein claim. Globally this number is even higher: approximately 85% (Inova 2017).

Proteins from various sources are increasingly available for application in various food products. Depending on its source, protein plays three major roles in food products: taste, nutrition, and functionality. More and more consumers are interested to learn about value of proteins derived from various sources. This symposium is being organized with the objective of characterizing various properties of proteins derived from different sources (e.g. milk, whey, pea, potato, soy, rice, etc.). Eminent subject experts will provide the latest updates on the research that is being conducted in this area.
What Food Technologists May Not Know (and Should?) About the Sugar Industry

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 07:45 AM - 08:45 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S402AB

Sugar (sucrose), produced from cane or beet, is the gold standard for sweeteners and will continue to be so. Both cane and beet are processed to recover the naturally occurring sucrose, with no molecular transformation necessary. The physical and chemical properties of sucrose are well established, including those related to its role in baking and as an ingredient. The nutritional role of sucrose, and other caloric sweeteners, remains a controversial issue. The diversity of sugar products, especially from cane – refined, raw, organic, turbinado, panella, etc. – is not fully understood by sugar users and will be summarized.

However, the sugar industry is much more diverse and interesting than appreciated by most food technologists. The impact of the industry on migration (forced), politics, economics, international trade and literature is very wide and will be described in some detail. Sugar cane overshadows beet in this respect, though there are some interesting historical and literary aspects of the latter. Cane production and processing provides the economic and social backbone in many parts of the world, though this is changing and the industry modernizes and factories expand in capacity.

Other underappreciated aspects of the industry relate to its size and geographic diversity. World production of crystalline sucrose exceeds 150 million tons, arguably the highest for a crystalline organic chemical. Currently the industry is a mix of small, traditional processing operations and very large, automated factories processing more than 30,000 tons of cane per day, requiring a seasonal harvest of approximately 50,000 hectares. Energy and environmental issues become very significant at this scale, especially with the potential for cogeneration. Data on this aspect of the industry will be the third part of the presentation.
Probiotics: Trends, Opportunities, and the Latest Quality-Management Technology

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

The 2016 global retail value of the probiotic market was estimated to be $39.9 billion; $4.3 billion was attributed to dietary supplements. With 38% growth expected between 2016 and 2021, this sector can drive incremental sales of many different food products formulated to contain probiotics. Hence, food product developers are increasingly paying attention. The most critical information for producers, formulators, and consumers is the number and identity of the organisms present, with the physiological state of those organisms recently starting to become of interest. Traditional enumeration adds many days and associated inventory costs to the probiotic product supply chain. Flow cytometry has recently migrated from the clinical laboratory into the probiotic space, where it is increasingly being used to address manufacturers’, formulators’, and consumers’ needs for rapid and accurate enumeration of probiotic organisms.

This symposium will explore trends in the rapidly growing probiotics marketplace and the impact of those trends on the food industry generally, along with the industry’s perception of testing needed to support this rapidly growing market. The technology of flow cytometry will be explained, with examples of how it can better address the needs of these food and food-related sectors than traditional microbiological methods. Finally, a case study on instrument and matrix validations will introduce the use of flow cytometry for enumeration of probiotics products and describe some of the technical challenges overcome in applying this technology to foods. The audience will leave with a clearer picture of opportunities for probiotic product development and a clearer picture of the latest technology available for managing probiotic quality.
Dialing Plant Protein Functionality for Enhanced Utilization

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

Consumers interested in health continue to view plant proteins favorably. As a result, sales of plant-based foods have seen a sustained growth, 8.1 percent alone since the last year (Nielsen, 2017). However, formulating with plant proteins comes with its own unique set of challenges. As the protein concentration increases in a protein-fortified food, its interactions with its surrounding matrix dominate, e.g. protein-protein, protein-water, or protein-flavor interactions. Secondly, processing parameters chosen during protein extraction and its transformation into the finished product can also influence these interactions and impact taste, texture or stability of the finished food product. Within this context, an understanding of protein’s functionality becomes essential not only to formulate foods with superior sensory characteristics but also to enhance protein utilization in additional product categories. Against this backdrop, this symposium will focus on new fundamental insights that have advanced our understanding of plant protein functionality. Speakers will emphasize new learning in the area of protein-flavor interactions, protein-protein interactions in blends, processing for optimal protein functionality and discuss how the knowledge of functionality can be leveraged for superior application.
The Challenge of Meat Alternatives: Stepping Up to the Center of the Plate

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Meat alternatives, specifically foods developed to match the flavor, texture, appearance, and form of traditional muscle food products such as burgers and frankfurters, have been a tiny, albeit consistent, sector of the food industry for decades. Recently, however, the segment has seen growth, with 14% growth in product launches from 2012 through 2016 and 8.6% revenue growth in the last year alone. Previously, meat alternatives were regarded as appealing largely to vegetarians and vegans, which represent a small portion of the population with limited growth. The current consumer landscape, however, sees a large and growing number of individuals looking to actively reduce their meat consumption while not eliminating it entirely, due to concerns around the environmental impact of large scale animal agriculture and potential health effects of heavy consumption of animal products. In 2014, 69% of German consumers said they ate a meatless meal once a week or more followed by 53% of UK consumers and 38% of US consumers; these countries alone representing a combined addressable market of 200 million consumers. Philanthropists and capital investors alike have empowered startup companies to expand into the realm of ingredient and process technologies available to improve market offerings. Even traditional meat companies have seen the appeal of the sector, acquiring or investing in recognized brands to diversify and, potentially, insulate their share of the consumer protein market. Still, despite many years of effort, the task of recreating the sensory experience of muscle foods remains difficult due to their inherent complexity. This symposium will explore meat alternatives through multiple lenses: a marketing focus on the current consumer shape of the segment, a technical focus on the science of structure in meat and meat alternatives, and a practical focus drawing on the experiences of several key individuals within the meat alternative space.