content tagged as Product Development

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Food manufacturers have until June 2018 to remove all PHOs from food due to the overwhelming clinical evidence of the negative health impacts of trans fats. Ag-scientists, US farmers, and the edible oil industry have developed an all-soy US-grown solution positioned to offer food scientists and food companies a functional alterative to trans fats without negative health effects.

This session will address three primary topics, the first being an examination of health biomarkers in a double-blind clinical feeding study that was recently completed. Dr. David Baer, lead researcher from USDA’s Agricultural Research Service’s Food Components and Health Laboratory, will present new findings about the effect of high oleic soybean oil on the risk factors used to define metabolic syndrome, which includes biomarkers of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). He will also discuss the nutritional benefits of high stability oils.

Following Dr. Baer, the VP of Research, Development and Innovation at Stratas Foods will share results from new functionality testing of high-stability oils and shortenings used in baking and frying applications. Specific functionality results will be discussed for applications including fried donuts, white cake, cookies, and icing.

Lastly, attendees will hear firsthand from a soybean farmer about the advantages of growing high-oleic soybeans including increased demand due to better performance in some food and industrial applications, environmental sustainability at the farm, increased value, and competitive yields. They will also address current availability of the product and anticipated future growth of the crop due to the many functionality and health benefits offered by high oleic soybeans.
Compression of food in utilized to engineer low volume, high density products that fulfill nutritional or functional requirements for products. Compression is used to create meal replacement bars, snack items, and nutritionally dense food items. Increased caloric density and portability/low volume requirements have been goals for both military and space-exploration feeding; operational ration components for the military are required to be lightweight and highly portable, while foods used in the space program are subject to stringent weight and volume constraints. Uniaxial compression has been the historical norm for producing such products; however, the recent application of sonic welding technology to food compression has enabled the development of innovative products that reduce or eliminate the use of chemical “binders” that are conventionally required to achieve a compressed product. This symposium will include talks highlighting: caloric densification efforts, technologies, and products employed in military ration component development; densified meal-bar research and development for NASA; sonic compression technology applications to food; and mechanics of food compression and mechanical analysis of foods.

Several speakers in this session will focus on the application of compression and caloric densification which can be used for special missions or commercial application. One speaker will focus on the application of conventional compression and ultrasonic compression to develop a nutrient dense meal replacement bar for space feeding. Another speaker will apply this technology to develop lightweight, easy-to-consume, nutrient-dense ration components for military field feeding. A third speaker will discuss the application of a novel compression technology that eliminates the need of binders/fillers (these ingredients can be replaced with micro nutrients, macro nutrients, and/or bioactive compounds) to produce a robustly agglomerated, pliable product.
Insects are an attractive alternative source of high-quality animal protein for the food industry with a substantially lower environmental footprint than vertebrate livestock. Insects can be raised very naturally compared to other livestock, without the use of hormones, antibiotics, steroids; and very cleanly, free from hazards such as pathogens. Insects from farms in the US and Europe do not appear to contain foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria, E. coli or Staphylococcus aureus. Although billions of pounds of insects have been produced for the pet food and animal feed industry, a huge global potential exists for viable food and ingredient production from insects. Research is proving that insect farming, processing, and consumption are viable options both economically and nutritionally. The private sector is recognizing insects have potential for alleviating problems related to food security and are looking to them for food ingredients, fish meal, emergency food relief, and domestic animal feed.

This session will provide the audience with historical, current, and future research on the business of utilizing insects as viable food ingredients for both feeding the world and providing new functional and nutritional options for the food industry.
Participants will learn about the general biology of vitamin D and its hormonal regulation of multiple aspects of health apart from its key role in skeletal maintenance. Topics to be discussed include alternative sources of vitamin D supply by UV synthesis and diet and criteria for defining adequacy and risk of inadequacy.

Participants will also learn about results from a clinical intervention study where vitamin D was supplemented (both D2 and D3 forms) for a period of 6 months to examine its effects on cognitive function and mood in a healthy elderly cohort.

Vitamin D, by direct and indirect regulation of more than 200 genes, exerts bioactivity as a hormone, controlling calcium absorption, tissue and immune cell growth and inflammation. Current recommendations for vitamin D adequacy are associated with requirements for skeletal maintenance. The recommended daily allowances (RDA) as defined for bone health are 600 IU (15 μg)/day up to 70 years of age, and 800 IU/day over 70 years of age. By consensus, adequate vitamin D status for mineral homeostasis, bone health, and muscle function is defined as serum levels of 25-OH-D above 75 nM, insufficiency in the range of 50–75 nM, and deficiency below 50 nM. It is likely that elevated needs for vitamin D associated with chronic diseased states, including in bone, lead to depletion of tissue stores of vitamin D. Co-incidence of multiple diseases states frequently occurs in aging, and can account for the elevated need and risk of depletion in older people. In this session, the synthesis and regulation of the multiple functions of vitamin D and comparative bio-efficacy of vitamin D3 and D2 analogues will be explained.

UV-mediated synthesis of vitamin D3 accounts for more than 90% of vitamin D supply in adults, although dietary sources, including from oily fish, egg yolks, and meat, are known. A new and convenient source of vitamin D2 is increasingly available from UV-treated mushrooms and, potentially other fungal sources, including yeasts. Controlled production of vitamin D2 from the pro-vitamin D2 substrate ergosterol in fungi and yeasts represents an additional opportunity for development of functional-food ingredients to support dietary supplementation of vitamin D. In this session, the logistics of quality-controlled enhancement of vitamin D2 in substrates containing ergosterol for production of fresh and processed sources of vitamin D2 in the food supply will be discussed.

Despite abundant cross-sectional evidence that low-vitamin-D status is correlated with dementia and cognitive decline in aging, interventional evidence for benefits of vitamin D supplementation in the elderly is lacking. In support of the importance of vitamin D for brain health is the presence of the enzyme that produces the active form of vitamin D, 1α-hydroxylase, in cerebrospinal fluid, and that the receptor for the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, is found throughout the human brain. We conducted a clinical trial aimed at measuring effects of vitamin D, supplied as either vitamin D3 or vitamin D2 in a mushroom matrix together with control mushroom and placebo, on cognition and mood in a cohort of healthy elderly people. In this session, the findings from this pioneering clinical trial will be presented and interpreted.
Databases and peer-reviewed articles on sensory and consumer research are full of a lot of significant academic- and business-centric studies that discuss the “right sample size” for any given project. The choice of sample size has huge implications for all aspects of product development since it can impact the overall cost of a project, how expensive the product development time and energy might be, and therefore, whether a given approach will be commissioned or not. The goal of this curated symposium is to present IFT members with a dialog between industry professionals on the real truths and myths behind practices that are thought to be commonly agreed-upon approaches. When planning a product or consumer study, deciding on the number of people (whether panelists or consumers) seems arbitrary, but the truth (or myth) of the issue is much more involved and elaborate than picking a number at random. The literature tells us that the number of people is an essential measure of the power of a research study. The Sensory and Consumer Sciences Division (SCSD) has selected a number of practicing professionals to provide understanding to both the division membership and the greater food and beverage product design and development community on the status of this area of interest.
Insects are an attractive alternative source of high quality animal protein for the food industry with a substantially lower environmental footprint than vertebrate livestock. Insects can be raised very naturally compared with other livestock, without hormones, antibiotics, and steroids; and very cleanly, free from hazards such as pathogens. Insects from farms in the US and Europe do not appear to contain foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria, E. coli or Staphylococcus aureus. Although billions of pounds of insects have been produced for the pet food and animal feed industry, a huge global potential exists for viable food and ingredient production from insects. Research is proving that insect farming, processing and consumption a viable option both economically and nutritionally. The private sector is recognizing insects have potential in alleviating problems related to food security and are looking to them for food ingredients, fish meal, emergency food relief, and domestic animal feed.

This session will offer insights into the advances in all aspects of commoditizing insects as ingredients for the food industry, including farming and production, supply chain, processing developments and regulatory and economic aspects of this emerging industry.
The idea of producing meat using cell culture in a controlled and sterile environment, rather than from slaughtered animals has been discussed for decades. However, the technology to make this vision a reality has only recently come to fruition. Clean meat, or cell-cultured meat, has the ability to address all of the most pressing concerns about conventional animal agriculture, including land use, water consumption, food safety, antibiotic overuse, and animal welfare concerns. In this session, we will discuss the developments that have occurred along the entire pathway to commercialization – from translation between various related fields of academic research to launching start-ups to defining the regulatory landscape for this new category of food products.

Our speakers include a prominent academic researcher, the CEO of the leading U.S. clean meat company, and a food law policy expert – thus spanning the development of this emerging industry from basic research to regulatory approval. The session will be opened by Dr. Liz Specht, senior scientist with the Good Food Institute, to introduce the concept of clean meat, as this will be a novel topic for many members of the audience, and to put each speaker’s role in the development of this technology in context. She will also moderate the discussion following the speakers’ talks, in which audience members will be invited to engage in discussion with all members of the panel.

David Kaplan, PhD, is a Distinguished Professor and Director of the Bioengineering and Biotechnology Center at Tufts University, and is a renowned researcher in tissue, biomedical, and chemical engineering. He is currently advising a Ph.D. student conducting research directed towards cell cultured meat development, and will discuss the potential for translating advances in other academic areas towards accelerating the development of clean meat.

Uma Valeti, MD – a cardiologist by training – is the co-founder of Memphis Meats, which launched in 2015 and within months had produced its first cell cultured meatball. Uma will address the opportunities this field exhibits for entrepreneurial endeavors, the challenges he has faced in launching one of the very first clean meat companies, and an update of the rapid progress Memphis Meats has made in the last year.

Nicole Negowetti, JD, is a food policy expert and former law professor, and she currently serves as Policy Director for the Good Food Institute. She will provide insight on the regulatory roadmap that these new products will have to navigate – addressing questions of jurisdiction, labeling, and food safety – as well as discuss issues of transparency and consumer acceptability.
The acceptable daily intake (ADI), defined as the amount of a food additive on a body weight basis that can be ingested over a lifetime without an appreciable health risk, has been an important tool for food additive risk assessment for over 50 years. Deriving the ADI involves the selection of an appropriate intake threshold from chronic animal toxicity studies or human studies and applying safety factors to account for metabolic differences between animals and humans (interspecies differences) and human variability (intraspecies differences). Typically, a default factor of 10 is assigned to each of these parameters and multiplied together, resulting in a total safety factor of 100. While additional safety factors may be used to account for deficiencies in the available scientific evidence, the default safety factors may be revised to account for the mode of action of the food additive in animals and humans by using chemical-specific adjustment factors (CSAFs). Established using studies that characterize the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic differences of the food additive between humans and animals and/or within humans, CSAFs are useful tools to define the safety of a particular food additive and refine the estimated ADI, accordingly.

This symposium will present considerations for deriving and utilizing the ADI in food additive safety evaluations. Specifically, practical implications and challenges of developing studies to support food additive safety assessments will be discussed, with a focus on those studies required to define CSAFs. Additionally, the application and validity of utilizing CSAFs to derive an ADI will be presented using a recent case example.