content tagged as Food Engineering

11 - 14 Results out of 14
Probabilistic Engineering Approaches to Food Safety, Quality, and Shelf-Life: A Primer on Applications to Moisture-Controlled, Thermally Processed, and Chilled/Frozen Foods

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 07:45 AM - 08:45 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S401D

All food manufacturers face great challenges when making decisions ensuring that quality and safety expectations are met for every item, all production lots, and up to the product expiration date. For example, low-acid food manufacturers use pasteurization and refrigeration, water activity reduction, or commercial sterilization to control or inactivate pathogenic bacterial spores. In each case, the alternative chosen should ensure product safety with high confidence. In terms of quality, market success requires meeting expectations when each product reaches its final consumer. Shelf-life estimation requires data on raw materials, processing factors, distribution conditions, and consumer product handling practices. Also necessary is a manufacturing policy on the percentage of products that must retain a desirable quality at the end of their shelf-life (varies significantly but 80% could be typical). Estimations supporting these decisions are inadequate or inappropriate if they are based on typical or extreme values, respectively. The Monte Carlo based approach covered in this primer will illustrate with practical examples the inclusion of data variability.

Safety, quality, and shelf-life estimation tools allowing the inclusion of multiple sources of variability, type of data needed, and the outputs generated will be demonstrated for dry, thermally-processed, and chilled/frozen foods. Attendees participation will be encouraged by asking them to select scenarios of their interest. Those bringing a laptop will receive a PC Excel 2016 spreadsheet to explore multiple scenarios and share findings with the group. The exploration will focus on the effect on the shelf-life of dry fruits of changes in net weight, initial moisture content, storage RH, and the percentage of products meeting the quality target.

The material selected by the speakers for this 60-minute primer (including introduction and closing comments by the session organizers) has been peer-reviewed, presented in seminars in the US, Europe, Asia, and Latin America, taught in graduate/undergraduate courses, and used in 2-day workshops for food industry professionals.
Innovation in Hybrid, High Pressure Thermal Processing for Commercial Manufacturing of Premium Ready-to-Eat Foods and Beverages

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

High pressure processing (HPP) is a well-established technology that has successfully carved out a niche in commercial food and beverage manufacturing. However, HPP applied at cold-ambient temperatures is limited in its ability to inactivate all microorganisms, and most notably, cannot inactivate microbial spores. For this reason, HPP cannot be used to safely manufacture products where spores are a concern and is therefore not reaching its market potential. High pressure thermal processing (HPTP), a hybrid-HPP technology simultaneously applying pressure and heat, can inactivate microbial spores and presents an exciting opportunity for innovation in the shelf- and chill-stable, low-acid food categories; particularly in the ready-to-eat meal category. Products with fresh-like attributes, extended shelf-life, and a reduced requirement for chemical preservatives and/or detrimental thermal processes, are examples of why HPTP is an attractive alternative to established approaches used for the preservation of low-acid foods. And while HPTP research dates back some 20 years, developments necessary to enable commercial adoption have been lacking; in particular, engineering developments to make available commercial-scale HPTP systems. Further, translation of fundamental research regarding spore inactivation and the formation of food processing contaminants into tangible information that underpins the development of safe commercial-scale processes has been similarly absent. An additional hurdle to the commercial application of HPTP has been the identification of suitable packaging materials that not only withstand the process itself, but provide suitable barrier properties throughout the shelf-life of the product. However, as the presentations in this proposed symposium will demonstrate, these barriers to commercialization are about to fall, unlocking significant market potential for the delivery of premium and high-quality/value products.

The proposed talks in this symposium will be presented by leading experts from industry. The symposium has been organized, and will be moderated, by Sandra Olivier (CSIRO) and Dr Kai Knoerzer (CSIRO).
Advances and Challenges in the Design, Development, and Implementation/Commercialization of Novel Food Processing and Packaging Technologies

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

The food processing industry and academic institutions are constantly researching and implementing novel technologies, improving existing technologies, and adapting them to new products and new markets. Challenges faced include reducing wastage through increased shelf-life with greater quality retention; better assessment of shelf-life of perishables through the development of novel sensors, intelligent packaging, and accurate monitoring of the cold supply chain; increased energy efficiencies and reduced carbon foot print through equipment and process modeling and optimization; scaling up from laboratory or pilot plant to industrial throughput; incorporating novel nano-scale and other materials into foods, food contact surfaces, or packaging materials; and economically integrating hurdle and combined technologies. Bridging research to commercial development, whether within food processing companies, equipment and instrumentation companies or from academic institutions is challenging

Three Distinguished Lectures from outstanding professionals identified by the Nonthermal, Packaging, and Food Engineering Divisions will shed light into the current advances and challenges in the design, development, and implementation of novel food processing and packaging technologies. The Distinguished Lecturers will contrast the scientific and technological merits of recent advances to the economic and multidisciplinary constraints of the industry. Reflection on previous success stories and an assessment of current research trends will provide attendees with a holistic perspective of the state-of-the art on emerging technologies. This session is co-sponsored by the Food Science and Technology Honorary Society Phi Tau Sigma.
The Status and Future of In-Place Cleaning, Part I

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S401D

The concept of in-place cleaning (CIP) has been commercialized for over 70 years, but many of the basic mechanisms of this approach to cleaning food contact surfaces remain unexplored. This approach to cleaning has had significant impacts on the time and labor for food manufacturing operations, and has ensured uniformity and consistency in cleaning practices. Although CIP processes are very effective, it is currently impossible to ensure that the outcomes are optimum. The overall objective of this symposium is to review the current status of CIP, and explore the research challenges to be addressed. Much of the reviewed interest in the science and engineering of CIP is associated with the mechanisms involved in creating the residues on food-contact surfaces, as well as the mechanisms associated with removal of the residues. Included in the renewed focus is the need to accomplish cleaning with reduced amounts of water, a more conservative use of cleaning agents, and an overall reduction in energy requirements. In multiuse product lines, product and operational losses due to cleaning and changeover are significant and represent an environmental impact of the manufacturing operation. Ultimately, the cleaning process must continue to meet an increasing array of challenges to ensure that food contact surfaces are free of residues that could support creation of biofilms and lead to product contamination.