Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

content tagged as Sessions

1 - 10 Results out of 95
New Cannabis Frontiers in Public Health, Medical Science, and Food Safety

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277

After a thirty-five-year War on Drugs, cannabis marijuana (Cannabis sativa) is legalized for personal or recreational use in 30 states and the District of Columbia (State Marijuana Laws). Marijuana, known on the street by more than 200 names, is a schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act (1970), which is enforced by the Drug Enforcement Administration. It should be noted that two cannabis containing drugs have been approved by the FDA and that other components of marijuana may show promise for treating medical conditions including chronic pain, muscle spasms, seizure disorders, and nausea from cancer chemotherapy. However, a food containing marijuana is considered adulterated as defined under U.S. food regulations (21 CFR 342).
 
Despite these regulatory dynamics, food products that contain marijuana with its vast array of psychoactive and non-psychoactive substances represent approximately 10 percent of the total U.S. cannabis market, which is nearly $5 billion and escalating daily. In addition, many analytical challenges remain in order to accurately assess the content of food products that contain THC and related cannabinoids. Recent reports indicate many cannabis-containing food products are out of compliance in many aspects when applied to the normal food supply. Yet, a recent GRAS affirmation of CBD may represent the regulatory and safety beginning of future applications in foods and dietary supplements.
 
The pharmacokinetics of the various cannabinoids, such as THC, and the associated terpenes, differ based on route of administration, such as inhalation or oral ingestion. For example, inhalation of THC may produce psychotropic effects within seconds to a few minutes, whereas those effects are typically delayed 60-90 minutes post ingestion and in addition, may be amplified following oral consumption. Most importantly, cannabis yields over 770 chemical compounds, many of which are less than well-characterized, and for which no safety data are available. Furthermore, only limited toxicological evaluations have been conducted via oral administration.
 
Yet, these kinds of food products are readily available but without traditional safety assessment, clinical substantiation, or regulatory compliance. There is a desperate need to better understand how exposure via various routes of administration, including oral through marijuana edibles and especially during the developmental teen years, influences brain development and brain injury. The legalization of marijuana may prove to be of significant political and social benefit, but the medical impact of readily available and potent edible forms of this plant must be better understood and approached with utmost care and caution.
A Holistic Approach to Sugar Reduction in Food and Beverage Applications

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268

With the continued emphasis on sugar content in foods, consumers are demanding more sugar reduction across all food categories. Governments around the globe are adding more pressure by implementing food labels to highlight the amount of sugar on front of the packs or listed specifically as “added sugars” on the nutritional labels. Because of these emerging demands, food scientists around the world are looking into developing and commercializing novel sweetener systems that can not only provide sweetness but also other key attributes, such as texture, shelf life, clean/consumer friendly label, and various other specific characteristics needed from the typical products.
 
The initial presentation of this session will highlight the latest trends in sugar reduction and consumer perception over various ingredient solutions. The subsequent presentations will focus on sugar reduction in three application areas; dairy, chocolate and sweet baked goods. The speakers will outline the key challenges when it comes to replacing sugar and ingredient and/or formulation solutions are available to overcome these challenges. Each presentation will also demonstrate case studies to help illustrate how ingredients alone or in combination can address the challenges of sugar reduction in the different application categories.
From Farm to Fork: A Systemic Approach to Reducing Post-Harvest Losses Throughout the Supply Chain

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

From the large amount of food that is harvested in our global food system, for human and animal use, an overwhelming portion of the harvest does not make it to the end of the supply chain. This results in losses for food producers, as well as overall reduction in the quality and quantity of food. This ongoing gap regarding the reduction of post-harvest losses and conservation of quality food fit for consumption needs to be overcome in order to better address challenges associated with global food security. Major obstacles are present in all stages of the supply chain. The current session aims to give examples of how analysis of whole supply chains can assist with loss reduction, as well as specific examples of how loss can be tackled on the farm and at the shelf for different product categories. With all supply chains, a multifaceted approach is often necessary to pinpoint and develop suitable post-harvest loss reduction solutions for significant steps in the chain. The speakers have been selected based on their involvement in and knowledge of particular supply chains or points in the supply chain. Each of the speakers will share their expertise on a particular supply chain or point in the supply chain, which will include a discussion of critical points that influence post-harvest loss and strategies to tackle these. The following will be presented in this session: (i) an introduction to post-harvest losses from farm to fork, (ii) short food supply chain analysis as a system approach, (iii) post-harvest grain sorting as an on-farm strategy, and (iv) packaging options for loss-reduction of fresh produce. To end the session, a panel discussion will be held to allow the speakers and audience an opportunity to deliberate pros and cons of specific strategies, as well as to identify further areas of interest.
Protein Based Nanoparticles as Novel Structure-Building Blocks and Delivery Systems for Bioactives: Functionality, Formation, and Characterization

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Proteins are high molecular weight biopolymers composed of α-L amino acids connected by peptide bonds. Differences in the number, type (aliphatic, aromatic, charged, polar, or non-polar) and sequence of amino acids that form the primary structure of proteins lead to proteins with distinctly different molecular and physicochemical properties. As a result of the endless possible combinations of amino acids, proteins can differ in molecular weight, solubility, flexibility, conformation, polarity, charge, and isoelectric point. These differences provide each protein functional characteristics that will govern the type of interactions with each other or with other molecules in their environment. Such interactions happen through covalent, van der Waals, steric, hydrogen, hydrophobic, and electrostatic molecular interactions. As a result of the differences in properties and interactions, protein nanoparticles can be assembled using various preparation methods, from one or more types of protein, or from a combination of a protein and another type of biopolymer (usually a polysaccharide).
 
The final characteristics of the nanoparticles are determined by the proteins and/or polysaccharides used, as well as conditions during their fabrication. Techniques that are commonly used in producing protein nanoparticles include antisolvent precipitation, heat set gelation, extrusion/emulsion templating, electrospinning, and formation of soluble complexes or coacervates with oppositely charge biopolymers. Once protein nanoparticles are formed they must be characterized to assess their functionality. Among the most common characterization methods are particle size and morphology and particle charge. On the other hand, in order to characterize the protein nanoparticles composition and physical state, one can employ fluorescence, infrared spectroscopy, or X-ray techniques. Proteins nanoparticles can be suitable for use in food products as structural elements in building novel structures. Using proteins to form structures on a nanoscale level is a promising strategy to improve the stability or organoleptic characteristics of food products, such as flavor, texture, and consistency. Protein nanoparticles can also be used as delivery systems for bioactive compounds that unless encapsulated would not be stable or bioaccessible. This symposium will consist of three presentation focused on the potential to use protein nanoparticles as either building blocks to create novel food structures or delivery systems for control release of bioactives or flavor compounds. The three talks will describe fabrication, characterization and functionality of the different protein-based nanoparticles. A fourth talk will focus on the use of novel techniques such as luminescence spectroscopy to further understand and predict the behavior of proteins during the formation of nanostructures.
Pet Food Safety: Full Circle

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390

The pet food industry is one of the fastest growing “food” sectors in the United States. According to the American Pet Products Association in 2017 pet owners in the United States sent $69.51 billion on the pet industry of which $29.07 billion on pet food. Consumers continue to seek out pet food options advertised as “natural,” “raw,” or minimally processed” due to perceived health benefits. At the same time, consumers are worried about food safety of the pet foods they feed their pets. This is due to recent pet food recalls in late 2017 and early 2018. In fact, a recent FDA study sampled 196 raw pet foods and found 15 positive for Salmonella and 32 positive for Listeria monocytogenes. Yet almost none were discovered in dry pet food during the same study. Pet food often is made utilizing a variety of muscle foods including products from the rendering industry. In a survey of muscle foods division members, pet food was the number one symposium topic they wished to see at IFT 2019. Rendering is often a side of the muscle foods industry that does not get discussed, but is a vital part of the industry that offers many products that are utilized to make other products. Products from rendering are often used in pet food. The symposium will also address pet food safety research being conducted in academia as well as an industry perspective on pet food safety.
An Innovative and Comprehensive Approach to Value Creation From Waste: From Gold Nano Particles to Whey Beer

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385

With the growing agricultural industry trying to feed the ever-increasing population, the focus has been slowly shifting towards the impact on environment and sustainability, a growing consumer category that places a higher value on sustainable products and concern about where their product comes. In this dynamic consumer base, where trends are influenced by social media, industries are forced to pay attention to sustainability and look for more efficient processing methods and alternative technologies that are more resource friendly and resonate with consumers.
 
In this symposium we will focus on the consumer trends and drivers that are linked to sustainability and influence purchasing decisions and build a better brand image. We will provide a comprehensive approach on selecting an idea or concept from a consumer need and identifying a solution to address that need, and explore how to successfully commercialize these solutions.
One of the two issues we focus on is acid whey generated by Greek yogurt manufacturing. This by-product is currently applied in limited amounts to soil, animal feed, anaerobic digesters, and the drain. These nutrients, however, make ideal substrates for microbial fermentations and the talk focus on utilization of acid whey to create value added products.

The second area of focus explores how chemical and physical methods of nanoparticle synthesis use toxic chemicals in their synthesis protocols. A novel green method to develop gold nanoparticles using agricultural waste materials, such as grape seeds, skin, stalks, and even organic waste generated during the fall season due to the fall of maple leaves and pine needles, to synthesize gold nanoparticle will be presented in this session (AuNP).
Waste to Win: Food Industry R&D Projects Recovering Value From Waste Material

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273

Management of food waste is an emerging trend driven not only by the economics of food processing, but increasingly, consumer demands for a sustainable food supply and corporate and industry-wide commitments to make our global food system sustainable for generations to come. Success stories within this field can be described by ecosystems that satisfy business models with technologies that work. This symposium will describe marketplace forces for food waste mitigation, the ecosystems that are emerging, and share three new industrial R&D stories describing how successfully applying today’s technology can convert food-waste to a value-added product stream.
Enter the Matrix: Impact of Food Structure on Health Outcomes and Sensory Perception

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268

Dietary guidance is developed to help people meet nutrient needs and limit their intake of certain nutrients, but it does not typically account for how nutrient delivery may vary based on food source. As recently as 2010, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans has recommended limiting total fat intake in the diet to reduce the risk of chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease. However, some foods, including some high in fat, have a different impact on health than would be expected based on their nutrient content. Recent research indicates that the structure of a food, or food matrix, affects the impact of that food on health outcomes and may be responsible for differences between the expected health outcomes linked with a food and its observed impact. Using dairy foods and avocados as case studies, this session explores the importance and feasibility of considering food form as well as nutrient profile in evaluating the health impact of dietary patterns and dietary recommendations. The impact of the food matrix on satiety and sensory perception of these foods will be addressed as well.
Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods in Sports Nutrition, Muscle Building, and Exercise

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

It is well recognized that optimal nutrition, selected nutraceuticals, and functional foods play a critical role in enhancing human performance in sports and exercise activities and overall health. With our growing knowledge of the functioning of human body, changing dietary requirements and recommendations, and rapid advances in the field of drugs and supplements that affect human health and performance, there is a growing need for a comprehensive appraisal of the nutritional benefits in exercise and human health which is addressed in a volume titled “The Nutritional Advantages in Enhanced Human Performance and Exercise.” The present symposium will be divided into four lectures.
 
The introductory theme in this session is a general overview of the roles of nutrition in human health. This lecture will be focused on reviewing the nutritional prophylaxis in human health including the food exchange values, personalized nutrition, and a critical assessment of antioxidants, nutraceuticals and sports nutrition supplements, micronutrients, and various other nutritional supplements and their influence on human health, sports performance, and exercise. Performance enhancement drugs and selected sports supplements will be covered to address concerns associated with the benefits and potential toxicities of the use of performance-enhancing supplements.
 
The second lecture will cover intricate aspects of cardiovascular function, resistance training, aerobic and anaerobic exercises, bioenergetics and energy balance, and the nutritional requirements associated with these various fitness programs. This lecture will cover vital features of endurance training, high-altitude sports, winter sports, paralympic games, zero-gravity (space) fitness, and extreme sports such as bungee jumping, hang gliding, sky diving, and sumo wrestling. The benefits of selected nutrients will also be emphasized in this lecture.
 
The third lecture will cover detailed cellular and molecular mechanism associated with muscle growth, repair, preservation, and its association with physical performance. Intracellular signaling mechanisms, neuromuscular adaptations, and gene regulation topics covered in this section unveil cutting edge progress in molecular biology relating to muscle health. Nitric acid pathophysiology and the role of ATP will be discussed. The pathophysiology of mTOR signaling pathways in myogenesis, muscle hypertrophy, and muscle atrophy will be discussed. Roles of selected nutraceuticals and functional foods in mTOR-dependent muscle growth will be emphasized.
 
The fourth lecture will provide an exhaustive overview of selected functional foods, minerals, supplements, phytochemicals, amino acids, transition metals, small molecules, and other ergogenic agents that have been implicated in sports nutrition, muscle building, and exercise performance. Doping agents will be briefly covered. Dietary recommendation for sports nutrition, performance athletes, and muscle and body builders will be emphasized. Finally, safety and toxicity issues will be elaborated.
 
We will address various aspects of sports and nutrition in human health by examining cutting-edge scientific research relating to muscle physiology. By providing a comprehensive review of food and supplements affecting human health and well-being, this session hopes to extend our understanding of the nutritional advantages in enhanced human performance, muscle building, and exercise.
Plant-Based Proteins: Intakes, Adequacy, and Future Research Needs

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

There are 9 amino acids that are indispensable, meaning that they cannot be produced endogenously and therefore must be consumed from the diet so that proper protein synthesis can take place. As consumers become increasingly conscientious about their health, the environment, and the rights and welfare of animals, consumer interest in plant-based proteins has increased. As such, the food industry has responded with the introduction of foods containing novel plant-based proteins in the marketplace. How is protein quality determined, and can foods with novel plant-based proteins meet the protein requirements of the different segments of a population?   
 
In this symposium, a background on dietary protein and amino acid requirements and the health implications of not meeting or exceeding these requirements, as well as the most recent advancements in the determination of protein quality, will be presented. In addition, information related to global trends in current protein intakes, including trends related to the intakes of animal versus plant-based proteins, will be presented. A discussion of the tools used to estimate dietary intakes in key global markets will be presented, and using these surveys, estimates of the intakes of total and animal- vs. plant-based proteins will be presented for different age and gender groups. An assessment of intakes versus recommendations will be provided to determine whether the consumption of protein is inadequate, adequate, or excessive, with a special focus on vulnerable age groups and individuals consuming predominantly plant-based diets. Finally, using data from the published literature, a systematic review of studies conducted in vegans/vegetarians will be presented, with the objective of determining whether the intakes of total protein and the indispensable amino acids are sufficient and whether there are any health implications.