content tagged as Symposium

11 - 20 Results out of 81
Is It Time to Change the Paradigm for Food Toxicology? Nitrate as a Case Study

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Nitrate is an anion produced naturally in the body, it occurs naturally in the environment, and it is also used as a fertilizer as well as a food additive, sometimes together with nitrite. Human exposure occurs readily, since it is part of a normal diet, primarily via consumption of vegetables (typically 60-80%), though nitrate is also found in fruits, dairy products, cured meats, fish, beers, water, and cereals. In recent years, significant human health benefits have been reported for nitrate, especially for cardiovascular effects such as blood pressure, platelets, endothelial function, mitochondrial efficiency, and exercise, as well as those health benefits that are typically associated with a diet high in vegetable content. Historically, going back over 70 years, however, there have been some reported health concerns related to nitrate exposure involving the occurrence of methemoglobinemia, an effect which is now understood to be limited to infants and which is confounded by other factors (e.g., gastroenteritis), as well as being associated with high-dose nitrate exposures in well water. While multiple nitrate toxicity values have been developed by several public health and regulatory agencies (USEPA, 1991; ATSDR, 2015), the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has also established an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI), but it is the only value unique to food consumption as a source of exposure. ADIs by definition are estimates of a food additive that can be ingested daily over a lifetime without appreciable health risk. The current JECFA ADI for nitrate is 0-3.7 mg/kg-day. However, those consumers around the world with high-vegetable intake diets, such as those on the “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” (DASH Diet), have nitrate intakes that greatly exceed the JEFCA ADI. Unfortunately, this ADI is based solely on effects seen in a chronic rat toxicology bioassay, which is in turn based on the current toxicology paradigm of using the results of animal toxicity studies to estimate possible human risk. This symposium will summarize the current science on dietary nitrate (and nitrite) as important precursors of nitric oxide (NO), which is an important cell-signaling molecule and potent vasodilator. It will also propose an alternative paradigm of reassessing the potential human health effects of nitrate, seeking to establish an evidence-based, health-protective ADI that takes into account the complexities surrounding nitrate, including effects such as the beneficial physiological role of nitrate and nitrite in maintaining adequate NO levels, the relevance of exposure scenarios associated with adverse effects, differential kinetics by age and species, and the health benefits of diets high in nitrate-rich vegetables and fruits.
It’s a New Day in Frozen Desserts: Decode the Latest Healthy Snack Channel Through Robust, Value Added Formulation

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

The face of frozen desserts is changing at a rapid pace, and a host of these products are no longer just expected to be a dessert. With advancements and consumer interests in alternative dairy, protein, expanding knowledge of added sugars and a host of other functional claims this traditional sometimes food is being revamped. These changes are impacting eating occasion, as well as acceptability of what is on the label with new products beginning to be viewed as a delivery system for nutritional balance as well as any other dairy food can be. These undeniable forces are leading industry formulators, process engineers, sensory analysts, and ingredient suppliers to work together to offer innovation faster, within the stringent terms of the final consumer. It truly is the dawning of a new age in the ice cream and frozen dessert category, just take a stroll down your local grocer’s aisle.

This session will focus on formulating for value and nutrition added ice cream frozen dessert products, and highlight the fast moving market space from the consumer’s view in addition to sensory evaluation surrounding new innovations. A variety of functional ingredients will be discussed, from stabilization to new technologies in reducing added sugars to protein and fruit and vegetable sources. Manufacturing experts will also discuss the formulation and processing challenges they are seeing, and how the industry is reacting to these fast paced drivers.
Physiological Functions of D-Allulose: Current Findings and Future Research of Physiological Benefits

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

D-allulose is a new, GRAS, and zero-calorie sugar. D-allulose is composed of rare sugars—one of approximately 50 that exist in nature. It tastes nearly sweet as sucrose while it has very little caloric value. Its original technology was found by Professor Izumori from Kagawa University and his developments took over 20 years. During those 20 years of research, he and his group found a way to manufacture D-allulose at commercial scale, demonstrated its safety as a food ingredient, and gained regulatory rights to market the ingredient in different countries. D-allulose can be used as a bulking agent, a low calorie sweetener, and so on. D-allulose is not only an ingredient that reduces calories in finished products, but has potential as a specialty ingredient. The session focuses on its physiological functions and future potential of health benefits. The session covers carbohydrates metabolism, lipids metabolism, and the effect of hormones with D-allulose intake. Each presenter has a unique background and covers the current study and future study of d-allulose and rare sugars.
The Codex Alimentarius Commission: A Harmonizing International Benchmark for Global Food Trade

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

Codex is an international food standards setting organization of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO), established to develop international food standards, codes of practice, and other guidelines to protect consumer health and ensure fair practices in international trade in food. Within the parameters of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the SPS Agreement (Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures), Codex texts are considered international benchmarks/reference points for national food measures and regulations, and are used as standards against which to evaluate the claims of parties in WTO trade disputes. IFT is actively involved in Codex, providing scientific and technical input at all levels of five Codex committees—the committees on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses, Food Hygiene, Food Additives, Contaminants in Foods, and Food Labeling. This session will illuminate for attendees the important role of Codex in international trade, and will inform them on the Codex process, and how outcomes of its deliberations affect world food commerce. In addition to this in-depth introduction to Codex, presenters will address the work of Codex committees in which IFT is involved. Attendees will also learn ways in which they may draw on their own expertise and specific insights to contribute to IFT’s input into Codex.
Biosensors: Multiple Transduction Architectures for Practical Applications in Food

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S401D

The biosensors industry is now worth billions of US dollars, with applications mostly in the biomedical field. The use of biosensors as emerging technologies could revolutionize the study and detection of foodborne pathogens, toxins, allergens, contaminants, and biomarkers for food quality. The development of biosensors will further serve the food industry, agricultural sector, regulatory community, and public health. This symposium will feature some recent and significant advances in the field of biosensing and its applications to food safety, food quality, and food processing and agriculture as well as other biological systems. Presentations will provide insightful scientific and engineering analysis of advanced biosensor systems and propose future research directions. The speakers will address current innovation in biosensors transduction architectures for practical (point-of-service) applications in food and discuss strategies and current efforts to translate their current research to real-life applications. To maximize the attendance and impact of this symposium, presenters have been carefully chosen for their diverse expertise on biosensing technologies including: cantilever based sensor for real-time detection of foodborne pathogens, capillary electrophoresis combined with electrochemistry based sensing for point-of-service diagnostics, optical-based paper biosensors for in-field detection and discrimination of toxins, and disposable electrochemically based all graphene microfluidic biosensor for real-time foodborne pathogen detection in food processing facilities.
High Pressure Processing of Meats: Validation and Pathogen Destruction as Influenced by Formulation and Processing

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

Understanding validation requirements is critical in effectively designing products that assure corporate and regulatory food safety objectives can be met. This session will focus on understanding validation requirements from the FDA perspective and then continue with examples of screening and validation experiments designed to explore the impact of product formulation and processing conditions on microbial kill and food safety in meat based products. A thorough understanding of product characteristics potentially impacting efficacy of high pressure processing is ultimately critical in providing a robust food safety program.

The symposium begins with a review of FDA regulatory expectations concerning the proper design and execution of HPP validation experiments, including identification of critical variables along with guidelines for monitoring and reporting, and end with a review of the key elements of a thorough validation report. The next session will focus on experiments designed to elucidate the impact of formulation and processing conditions on pathogen kill in raw ground meat pet food products. Recent research on the impact of additional hurdle technologies utilizing antimicrobials, natural essential oils and herbal extracts to synergistically enhance microbial kill in the high pressure processing of meats will be reviewed. The final session will review a series of validation experiments designed to explore the impact of formulation, ingredients, and processing conditions with a stated objective of achieving a minimum 5-log Salmonella inactivation in a raw chicken pet food product.
Embracing Agricultural Coexistence: Organic, Conventional, and Biotechnology

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S402ABC

Today’s consumer seeks greater transparency to all aspects of the food they purchase, including how it is grown or raised. This session will address the similarities between organic, conventional, and biotech food production, and dispel myths between the various agriculture methods. Technologies along the continuum of gene modification will be discussed, including CRISPR gene editing, methodologies used in the Artic Apple, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene transfer. Real life examples from the family farm will include how the synergies of different farming systems work together toward true sustainability and how farming in sensitive watersheds has more to do with which tools in the toolbox are utilized over which farming system is employed. Attendees will be challenged to ensure their decision-making, policy making, and communications align with science and fact-based information while meeting consumer demand for greater transparency to food production methodology. Too often we believe the answer is one way or another, but multiple methods of agriculture can co-exist in today's dynamic and global food supply to provide choice to consumers.
A National FSMA Training, Outreach, and Education Landscape for the Produce Industry, Part I

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S501ABCD

Recognizing that one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to training, USDA NIFA and FDA CFSAN collaboratively established the National Food Safety Training, Education, Extension, Outreach, and Technical Assistance Program, as mandated in Section 209 of FSMA in 2015. As mandated in FSMA, this competitive grant program provides food safety training, education, extension, outreach, and technical assistance to owners and operators of farms, small food processors, and small fruit and vegetable merchant wholesalers. Grants issued through this program provide funding for a National Coordination Center (NCC) and four Regional Centers (RCs), to extend food safety education, training, and technical assistance to specific audiences.

To provide a variety of training formats shaped by product, region, size and other factors, USDA NIFA and FDA CFSAN added to the training infrastructure in 2016. USDA NIFA established the Food Safety Outreach competitive grant program (FSOP). The program has created 50 FSOP awards; 12 Multistate Education and Training Projects that support collaborations among states not necessarily located within the same regions, but having common food safety concerns, or addressing common commodities; 22 Community Outreach Projects that support the growth and expansion of already existing food safety education and outreach programs currently offered in local communities; and 16 Pilot Projects that support the development of potentially high-risk and high-impact food safety education and outreach programs in local communities.

Simultaneously, FDA awarded the Local Food Producer Outreach, Education, and Training to Enhance Food Safety and FSMA Compliance cooperative agreement to the National Farmers Union Foundation. The Native American Tribes Outreach, Education, and Training to Enhance Food Safety and FSMA Compliance cooperative agreement was awarded to the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville to support the development of training curricula and delivery, in addition to education and outreach, among local foods producers and tribes, respectively.

This work builds upon an existing foundation created by the partnerships in the USDA and FDA FSMA Alliances, the Produce Safety Alliance, the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance, and the Sprout Safety Alliance which were established in 2010-2012. The FSMA Collaborative Forum, which first convened in April 2017, has provided a venue for collaboration among the training providers, including JIFSAN and NASDA.

These efforts have strategically focused on the delivery of customized training to target audiences to match the diversity of the food producers. This symposium will share the current program priority and RFA solicitation for FSOP potential applicants, work of the national produce safety training landscape, and the possibilities underway to leverage the momentum as a national best practice.
Innovations in Cost Reduction for the Cheese Industry

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427ABC

Milk production, prices, and imports have risen steadily to meet growing demand across regions like Asia, Africa, and Latin America; in the coming years it is expected that the global demand for dairy products will outpace the supply putting further pressure on the prices of dairy ingredients and the ability of manufacturers to formulate cost efficient and affordable products. Driven by the increasing number of fast food restaurants, food outlets, dining restaurants, and households across the globe it is expected that the global demand for cheese and cheese products will pass the $105 billion mark by 2019, up from $72 billion in 2012.

This growth represents challenges and opportunities for cheese manufacturers who need to address formulation cost, functionality, and processing efficiencies while maintaining the good eating experience in their cheese products. Furthermore, there is a trickle-down effect of prices on products derived as a result of cheese making such as whey protein isolates and concentrates. In this session, researchers and manufacturers will learn how to overcome these challenges by understanding the functionality of different ingredients, how different manufacturing practices/methodologies and equipment can impact efficiency and yield and how they can orchestrate all three to achieve cost reduction or yield improvement. Scientists and engineers from Agropur, Ingredion Incorporated, and GEA will present on the market trends, industry challenges, the latest technologies and ingredients, and how they can be used and incorporated in the present cheese making processes to address costs while maintaining functionality and eating experience. Participants will gain a greater understanding of both existing and new ingredients, technologies, and additives that would enable them reduce costs, improve yield, and increase profitability in a highly commoditized business.
Educating the Future Food Scientists Capable of Facing Evolving Regulatory and Technological Challenges in the Global Food Industry

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S501ABCD

Over the last 25 years, the food industry faced a great deal of change in food science and technology, culture, policy, and politics and has been truly “global” in its scope and impact. Also, the emergence of new foodborne hazards, along with consumer habits, preferences, and demand for convenience, nutrition, and safety of food and ingredients have resulted in increased need for understanding and navigating changing the regulatory landscape by food industry professionals. While the academic institutions have kept pace with technical training in food science and technology, the industry is experiencing a dire shortage of prospective employees: we need food scientists, technologists, and even production workers who can function adequately in changing the regulatory and technological climate. This symposium is designed to examine the current academic preparation for food science and technology graduates and discuss associated challenges and opportunities for the food industry. This symposium is sponsored by Phi Tau Sigma, the honor society of food science and technology.