Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

content tagged as Symposium

21 - 30 Results out of 66
Shedding Light on Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition: Opportunities and Challenges With Light-Based Technologies

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

The CDC estimates that every year, there are 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the United States due to consumption of foods contaminated with pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to process foods to effectively inactivate these microorganisms to render food safe. Various preservation technologies have been developed and adopted successfully to eliminate or reduce microbial contamination of the food. However, conventional treatments are very highly energy intensive with high capital and operational costs. Most often these processes also result in deterioration of food quality. Therefore, there is a need for alternative processing methods that are simple, cost-effective, have high inactivation efficiencies and yield minimal quality changes. Emerging technologies such as UV light, pulsed light and LED light processing show great promise since they can inactivate the pathogenic microorganisms while preserving the quality of foods.

This session will focus on recent advances in the light-based technologies for microbial decontamination. There has been an increased interest in the applications of light-based technologies such as UV light, pulsed light and LED light for inactivating microorganisms. Typically, these technologies operate in the UV, visible and near-infrared light range. Studies have shown that these technologies can effectively inactivate myriad microorganisms. However, there are several challenges associated with these technologies. The identified speakers are experts in the light-based technologies. They will shed light on the applications and challenges of these technologies. Due to the increased interest in these technologies, a symposium on this topic is highly warranted.

This session is sponsored by Phi Tau Sigma, the honor society of food science and technology.
Eating Less Red Meat: The Evidence Behind the Recommendation

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S405AB

This session will explore the evidence underlying recommendations for restricting red meat intake. In particular, evidence regarding current vs. recommended intakes to achieve a healthy dietary pattern, red meat’s impact on health outcomes such as heart health and cancer, and if red meat is compatible with a sustainable diet will be discussed. Three dynamic speakers will approach the question of red meat intake from multiple vantage points. Specifically, the health implications of including red meats in a healthy diet will be discussed. Secondly, the role of red meats and cancer will be explained based on current evidence. Finally, the challenges of limiting livestock production as a means of improving environmental outcomes while maintaining healthful diets for a growing population will be discussed.
New Advancements in Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Methods: From the Mouse Bioassay to Mass Spectrometry

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404D

Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins continue to be a threat to the global food supply through natural and possibly intentional routes of contamination. Rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of the most potent neurotoxin known, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), is of vital concern to prevent cases of the neuroparalytic disease (botulism). The mouse bioassay is considered the gold standard assay because it a positive result in the test requires all four steps of intoxication, internalization by the host through the small intestine, trafficking of the toxin to the target cell via the blood and lymphatic system, translocation into the target neuronal cell and finally, catalytic activity of the toxin's light chain on SNARE proteins to prevent the release of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction. Disadvantages to the mouse bioassay include the ethical concerns of using laboratory animals, the expensive cost, and the time to receive a positive result, which can take up to 4 days for a positive. Functional based assays (e. g. endopeptidase mass spectrometry, cell based and Förster resonance energy transfer) are specific and rely on the biological activity of the botulinum neurotoxin. Immunological and other in vitro assays, such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (e. g. DIG-ELISA) cannot discern between active and inactive toxins. This symposium will discuss the current assays used to detect botulinum neurotoxins in food and clinical samples, address their advantages and disadvantages, and highlight the most rapid, sensitive, and specific assays that are being widely adopted to replace existing toxin detection and/or screening methods.
The Future of Food Packaging

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

The future of food packaging concerns the consumer packaged food industry as well as business-to-business commerce in the case of food ingredients, as well as shipments of foods in intermediate states of processing for consumers. The future of food packaging relates to how packaging technology will be applied to extend the shelf life of food and decrease food waste while being competitive and meeting business-to-business as well as business-to-consumer needs. Future food packaging must be meet technical needs of a changing food supply, consumers’ buying patterns, and changes in complex supply and value chains. This session will not review past technologies in place; but, instead address emerging, future/pending food packaging technologies related to: sustainable packaging to align with the circular economy, meeting the needed of altering venues such as e-commerce, intelligent packaging to benefit the value chain, active packaging, and package design.

This topic is relevant to food industry professionals looking for innovations, development pipeline context, and competitive advantages, as well as researchers searching for alignment of their research to new packaging technologies. This session is co-sponsored by the Food Science and Technology Honorary Society Phi Tau Sigma.
Benchmarks, Hurdles, and Metrics to Compare Products and Categories: Is There a Right Way to Set a Standard for Success?

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S401ABC

Benchmarking is a tactic to assess how a given product matches up to competitors or standards in the marketplace. It can be used to establish sensory or business practice for the desired user experience. Benchmarking may be used to define fundamental, baseline metrics for a product, which allows for a form of performance tracking over product iterations. The benchmarking approach can be derived from a comprehensive series of quantitative studies all the way through to simple category review done in a small qualitative setting. Depending on the needs and risks, benchmarking can give the business informative design decisions to drive product design and user experience.

The goal of this curated symposium, the third in a series, is to present IFT members with a dialog between industry professionals on truths and myths behind practices that are thought to be commonly agreed upon approaches. In the case of benchmarking, knowing what the category benchmarks are for a given product may help the cross-functional team understand their strategy for product design, development and communication. There is a different point of view that the use of benchmarks that are general can hobble the same product design effort. Different disciplines in product design have varied perceptions regarding the value and approach to benchmarking. The Sensory and Consumer Sciences Division (SCSD) has selected a number of practicing professionals to discuss this area and provide understanding to both the division membership and the greater food and beverage product design and development community on the status of this area of interest.



*Our thanks to Compusense for their sponsorship of the Sensory Science track*
Whole Genome Sequencing: Overview and Role in Food Safety Systems

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S404D

In recent years, whole genome sequencing has emerged as a powerful food safety tool. The unprecedented resolution of whole genome sequencing allows for highly improved characterization and subtyping of microorganisms over methods such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis. This in turn has helped to improve epidemiological investigations of foodborne illnesses by more quickly and accurately linking clinical isolate whole genome sequence subtypes with those of food and environmental isolates. By providing this faster and more accurate link, foodborne illness outbreaks can be resolved in much more timely manner, which therefore helps reduce the number of foodborne illness cases. Consequently, whole genome sequencing has been adopted as a key tool in the repertoire of regulatory and public health agencies such as the FDA, USDA, and CDC for resolution of foodborne illness outbreak investigations and other applications such as monitoring of antimicrobial resistance.

Yet, although these agencies have begun to use whole genome sequencing in these ways, there is still a need for policy development surrounding the technology. As a result, the use of whole genome sequencing in the food industry has been limited. There are many different applications of the technology that would greatly improve food safety management from different areas of the food industry. For instance, whole genome sequencing can be used to identify possible harborage of a bacterium in a food processing facility. It can also be used to tie together isolates that were involved in a beef slaughter "event day." Other uses of next generation sequencing technology that are not directly applied to whole genome sequencing, such as 16S metagenomics, are also important for investigating sources of spoilage and determining the types of microorganisms present at different stages of the process. Yet, due to uncertainty around the regulatory perspective of the use of the technology, the food industry has been reluctant to widely adopt it as a tool in their food safety management systems.

This symposium will discuss an overview of the current technology that is available for performing whole genome sequencing and the current uses of whole genome sequencing by third party laboratories. This will then be followed up by presentations from the meat and produce industries where the use of whole genome sequencing by the members of these industries will be discussed, along with the concerns that still remain for these industries from a regulatory standpoint. Lastly, the session will be rounded out by a presentation on the legal and regulatory concerns on the use of whole genome sequencing, including information on the current landscape of policy development with regard to the technology.
Flavors of Food Protein Ingredients and Their Applications in Product Formulation

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

Plant proteins are important protein sources to meet the nutrition demands of the increasing population. Flavor is an important aspect of food ingredients, including protein ingredients, that dictates consumer acceptability of the final food products. Even though great progress has been made in the off-flavor control of soy protein, off-flavor of many plant protein ingredients remains a major limiting factor for their use in food products. Protein ingredients from different sources that carry unique flavor profiles, which can be influenced by the processing and storage conditions. In addition to their intrinsic flavors, protein ingredients interact with flavor compounds and influence the overall flavor profile of the final products when used in formulation or flavor encapsulation. This symposium aims to cover the intrinsic flavors of protein ingredients as well as their interaction with other food components that affect product flavor profiles. The odor and taste of protein ingredients and the effects of processing on protein flavor profile will be addressed in the first two presentations. The first presentation will be an overview of the off-flavor in pulses, which will also provide background knowledge for audiences who are not familiar with protein flavor or flavor chemistry. The second presentation will report the findings from ongoing research on rice protein flavor. Protein-flavor interaction and its influence on food formulation will be discussed in the third presentation. The fourth presentation will report on sensory evaluation studies of plant protein-based food products that are currently on the market. It will provide an understanding of how different attributes of protein ingredient influence consumer liking and how the information can be used in formulation to meet consumer needs. The topics will be of interest to audiences both from the food industry and academia who are working with protein ingredients or sensory evaluation.
Advances and Implementation in Ultraviolet Light Technology in Beverage, Dairy, and Grain Applications

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

Ultraviolet (UV) light has been used for decades for disinfecting water, and is broadly applied in Europe and North America. But until recently it has not been adopted for opaque fluids such as liquid foods and beverages. Recently, successful application in juice treatment has demonstrated the feasibility of UV for treating these fluids, and UV technology has started to emerge as a promising non-thermal preservation processes for other beverages. As a non-thermal, non-chemical disinfection technology, UV is anticipated to have minimal effects on product quality, flavor, and nutritive content. UV treatment is effective against food and water borne pathogens, spoilage microflora, spores, and can control pathogen levels to comply with regulatory requirements. The challenge remains that the range of optical and other properties of beverages is extremely broad. Also, each disinfection process may have different microbiological targets, meaning that each UV process has to be developed individually using specific system designs. In each application, three factors must be assessed: the treatment level required for the necessary reduction in target pathogen levels; the impact on product quality; and the regulatory requirements.

UV treatment may also be applied to destroy pathogens and chemical contaminants on solid surfaces, and UV is often used in laboratories to inactivate pathogens in fume hoods. Recently UV has been considered for treating surface toxins on grains, but in this application there are significant challenges in ensuring uniform treatment of an opaque, irregular object. In spite of this, recent research has shown promising results in this application, achieving significant reductions in mycotoxins on the surface of grain. Ultraviolet (UVC) light at 253.7 nm has shown promise as a non-ionizing postharvest strategy for the reduction of fungal and mycotoxin loads on both artificial and grain surfaces. Since the challenges of implementing UV are both theoretical and practical, this symposium has been designed as a collaboration between academic, government research, and UV industry experts. This symposium will briefly introduce the fundamental principles of UVC light germicidal effects and present approaches for evaluation of product and process parameters in applications of this technology for liquid foods and solid surfaces.

The first focused presentation will address the commercialization of UVC light application for non-thermal pasteurization of water in the dairy industry and requirements for regulatory compliance with the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance that governs the production of Class A dairy products. The second presentation will discuss UVC disinfection for beverages with low UV transmittance, focusing on juices. The effect of fluid optical properties on achieving required log reduction of food-borne pathogens will be discussed, and inactivation of relevant pathogens will be demonstrated. The third presentation will discuss the application of UV treatment for grain, in order to destroy mycotoxins on the food surface. The presenter will discuss results of a feasibility study of UVC light application to reduce fungal growth and mycotoxin loads on the surface of stored corn and wheat, and detail the challenges of UV treatment of UV treatment of irregular shapes.
The Ice Bucket Challenge to Develop New Food Technology Platforms

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S402AB

Most of the development and feedback from consumer research in new product platforms has evolved after the launch of beverage home appliances, however innovative platforms are emerging in the market and along with them the challenge of assessing the relevant attributes of the innovative product platform. Limitations when looking for appropriate reports, literature, methods and comparisons among different markets, limits the strategy of product launches and therefore opens the opportunity to scout/screen new experiences and attributes that consumers are looking in innovative product platforms across countries. The session includes the scouting of product market data, buying drivers, new product line concepts, and product dynamics.

Additionally, alternative nutritious ingredient sources are of the most importance due to the foreseen sustainable limitations of nutrients coming mainly from animal origin. Therefore the search for alternative highly nutritional sources and the development of new products with such ingredients, are one of the main drivers to fulfill the gap of innovative products with a high nutritional value. Additionally, fresh products, such as ready to bake products are highly desired by the consumer because they are commonly less processed food. As nutrition, flavor, and mouthfeel are the most important characteristics for product likeability, this opens the opportunity to develop new product lines and appliances that can deliver nutritious and delicious meals. This session summarizes the opportunities/challenges in the development of new food technology platforms and the scouting of consumer preferences on healthy, nutritious products.



*Our thanks to Naturex for their sponsorship of the Product Development & Ingredient Innovations track*
New Developments in Clean Meat: A New Era in Sustainable Meat Production

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 03:55 PM - 04:55 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

Clean meat – meat produced through cell culture – has the potential to address all of the most pressing concerns about industrialized animal agriculture, including land use, water consumption, food safety, antibiotic overuse, and animal welfare concerns. The first public demonstration and tasting showcasing clean meat technology occurred in 2013, with a price tag of hundreds of thousands of dollars per pound. In the intervening half-decade, the field has made tremendous progress – both in technological sophistication and in approaching economically feasible price points. As of the 2017 IFT session on clean meat in June of last year, over a half-dozen companies had launched to commercialize clean meat. Since that time a flurry of activity has occurred, including the genesis of several new companies and the influx of significant venture capital and meat industry corporate venture investment. In this session, we will focus on the developments that have occurred in this fast-moving field in the preceding 12 months. Our speakers include an academic with a long track record of rigorous bioprocess design for large-scale animal cell culture; the food policy expert who is spearheading the collaborative effort for clean meat’s regulatory approval; and the CEO of one of the first-established clean meat companies. The session will be opened and moderated by Dr. Liz Specht, senior scientist with the Good Food Institute, to introduce the concept of clean meat for audience members for whom this is a new concept and to put each speaker’s role in the development of this technology in context.

*Our thanks to Axiom for their sponsorship of the Alternative Protein Deep Dive programming*