Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

Sessions

21 - 30 Results out of 95
The Labeling of Bioengineered (BE) Foods: Consumer Perception and Industry Impact

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262

Bioengineered (BE) foods, previously referred to as genetically modified (GM) foods, are defined by the world health organization (WHO) as “organisms…in which the genetic material (DNA) has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally by mating and/or natural recombination” (WHO, 2014). The concept is not new; genetic modification of crops and foods has been occurring for centuries, (e.g., breeding programs to introduce desired traits). Although the American Medical Association, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the WHO have all endorsed concepts that BE foods are “safe” for consumption, a large portion of consumers do not believe this to be true, even condemning such foods as “Frankenfoods.” This symposium aims to present the current global regulations regarding BE food labeling, with a focus on the new U.S. Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS). It will highlight consumer perceptions of BE foods and the impact of BE food labeling on purchase intent. Finally, the necessary precautions industry must take to reduce the risk of litigation regarding claims of non-BE (non-GM foods) will be highlighted. This symposium is a must for anyone wanting to learn more about the new labeling regulations for BE foods and how these will impact the industry and consumers.
Update on European and US Regulatory Developments in Nutrition and Health

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

This session will give an update on nutrition and health aspects of regulatory developments in Europe and the United States.
Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) Technology for the Nonthermal Pasteurization of Powdered Foods

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392

Powdered foods are widely used as ingredients in manufacturing processed foods or consumed directly by humans for their energy and nutrient contents. The popularity of powdered foods is rising due to the convenience and versatility of their usage. In order to extend their shelf-life and prevent the occurrence of food-borne diseases, powdered foods, like other food products, have to be decontaminated. Inappropriate and insufficient decontamination has led to numerous outbreaks of foodborne diseases in recent years due to the existence of pathogenic microbes in dry milk powder, infant formula, spices, bread crust, etc., or through the cross contamination when inappropriately pasteurized food ingredients such as spices were added into food products. The current processes to decontaminate powdered foods are thermal treatment, gamma irradiation, microwave, UV light, pulsed light, and fumigation, etc. However, these processes causes significant unwanted changes in powdered foods including moisture content, nutrient loss, and other chemical-related safety concerns.
 
In this session, intense pulsed light (IPL) will be presented and discussed as an emerging technology for non-thermal and safe pasteurization of powdered foods without inducing significant nutritional and quality damages. This session is a concentrated symposium that will introduce to the audience the fundamental inactivation mechanisms of IPL technology, the system development and scale-up possibilities, and the current industrial manufacturers.
Healthy Fats: Oleogels as Replacements for Saturated and Trans Fats

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-386

This session is a joint session between the Food Chemistry division and the Dairy Foods division of IFT. “Healthy fat” has been identified as a priority topic in the 2019 IFT Annual Meeting for these divisions. Oleogel (or organogel) technology has been recognized as one of the most promising technologies to replace saturated/trans fats used in many food products such as margarine, spread, shortening, ice cream, icing, and chocolate. Typical edible oleogels consist of a small amount of an edible oleogelator and vegetable oil. Properties of an oleogel are very similar to those of conventional fats containing high contents of saturated and/or trans fats. The interest in oleogels, as indicated by the number of publications, has dramatically increased over the last decade due to the need for alternatives to saturated/trans fats. This session will focus on the most recent advances in this technology and future directions.
Communicating Microbiome Science

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 04:15 PM - 05:30 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Presentations followed by a panel discussion on communicating the science of the microbiome.
The Gut Microbiome and Personalization of Diet and Health Interventions

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 03:00 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

In this session recent advances in linking the gut microbiome to personalized dietary recommendations will be examined. With the rise of uBiome and other gut microbial sequencing companies, consumers want to know what they can do with this data. Unfortunately, much as with human genomic sequencing the applications have trailed behind the data availability. While gut microbial composition has been correlated with a large number of disease states, the causal chain (did the microbes cause the disease or did the disease favor those microbes?) has yet to be established in most cases. However, the link between diet and our gut microbiome is much more direct although somewhat bidirectional, with diet influencing the microbial composition and microbial metabolism influencing human health. It is clear that diet quite readily alters the relative abundances of the various microorganisms in the gut, but it appears to be much more difficult to change membership, the strains of bacteria that are present. At present it appears we can only incrementally change the microbiome that established itself in our guts soon after weaning. From this springs the idea that we can customize our diets to take maximal advantage of the bacteria that are already present in our intestinal tracts. They can produce a number of health altering compounds such as the short chain fatty acids, compounds that are important modulators of the immune system and metabolism. This session will examine efforts to identify signatures in the microbiota that indicate when a particular food or food component will be more or less beneficial. Does this mean that every microbiome needs to be treated as unique? Perhaps, however, efforts have been made to find relevant differences based on gender, geography, age, weight status and others. Furthermore, there is the somewhat controversial idea that people can be divided into a small number of ‘enterotypes’ that represent functionally and phylogenetically distinct types of microbiomes. The goal is that attendees will come away with a sense of where this relatively nascent field is going and its implications for food and ingredient producers.
Dietary Fiber Structure Controls on Gut Microbiome Composition and Function

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 12:15 PM - 01:30 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

Dr. Bruce Hamaker will provide context for how food carbohydrates interact with the gut microbiota to influence human nutrition and health. He will emphasize the impact of the interaction between gut microbiota and specific carbohydrate structures on human physiology, that stem from the tripartite interaction of carbohydrates, microbiota, and human physiology. Dr. Lindemann will address how carbohydrate structures, including fine structural variants, can have targeted impacts on certain species and genotypes within human gut microbiota, and the degree to which carbohydrate structure governs the composition and metabolism of microbiota. Further, this session will explore the idea that carbohydrates can be designed and blended to feed certain populations and control metabolic and health outcomes. The goal of the session is to provide context for the emerging use of carbohydrate structures in foods as a set of tools to manipulate the gut ecosystem toward improved health.
Parallels Among the Microbial Diversity in Fermented Vegetables and the Human Gut and Potential Applications in Food and Beverage Products

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 02:00 PM - 02:30 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

This session will provide background on glycoscience and the role of glyco structures in cell-cell communication, also involved in the cross-kingdom communication system to develop i.e., a potentially mutualistic, commensalistic or parasitic interaction. The innate immune system in mammals is an older evolutionary defense strategy, relatively speaking, and also it is the dominant immune system response found in plants, fungi, insects, and primitive multicellular eukaryote organisms.  Therefore, it is not surprising to have analog immune responses to secondary metabolites of plants, stimulating our innate immune cells. Research is revealing the molecular mechanism and the role of some dietary functional sugars in potentially improving the cellular communication with the gut microbiota. Advances in research is creating novel marketing opportunities for gut health, to potentially prevent the large number of specific health challenges arising from microbiota imbalance.
Overview of Gut Microbiome, Diet and Health

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 393-396

The opening presentation will provide an overview of the gut microbiome and its importance on host health. A discussion on how different diets and dietary components may impact the composition and activity of the microbes residing in the gastrointestinal tract, and how those changes may affect host health outcomes, will follow.
Enhancing Food Safety Education in Food Science and Engineering Courses Using Simulation

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 391-392

Customized simulation-based learning can engage learning across multiple disciplines like food science and engineering, without having to be expert in each one. Using the power and flexibility of simulation, we have designed educational modules with embedded “what-if” capabilities. In applying to food safety, the symposium would focus on building, deployment, and assessment of these simulation-based education modules. They have been implemented as a supplement to existing lecture and laboratory courses in 10 universities over a 4-year period as part of a USDA Higher Education Challenge Grant and this symposium is a culmination reporting the findings. These modules cover microbial growth/inactivation, process plus microbiology (retorting and sanitation of biofilm), and risk assessment. Two sets of modules are available, one for the food scientists and one for the engineers. Implemented using a learning management software, they can be accessed by large audiences and are free. We will focus on successes and challenges in a number of areas including setting learning outcomes, pedagogical aspects of module design, software choices, instructor-proof deployment on a large scale, and a financial model for sustaining the effort and assessment.