content tagged as Symposium

21 - 30 Results out of 66
High Pressure Processing of Meats: Validation and Pathogen Destruction as Influenced by Formulation and Processing

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

Understanding validation requirements is critical in effectively designing products that assure corporate and regulatory food safety objectives can be met. This session will focus on understanding validation requirements from the FDA perspective and then continue with examples of screening and validation experiments designed to explore the impact of product formulation and processing conditions on microbial kill and food safety in meat based products. A thorough understanding of product characteristics potentially impacting efficacy of high pressure processing is ultimately critical in providing a robust food safety program.

The symposium begins with a review of FDA regulatory expectations concerning the proper design and execution of HPP validation experiments, including identification of critical variables along with guidelines for monitoring and reporting, and end with a review of the key elements of a thorough validation report. The next session will focus on experiments designed to elucidate the impact of formulation and processing conditions on pathogen kill in raw ground meat pet food products. Recent research on the impact of additional hurdle technologies utilizing antimicrobials, natural essential oils and herbal extracts to synergistically enhance microbial kill in the high pressure processing of meats will be reviewed. The final session will review a series of validation experiments designed to explore the impact of formulation, ingredients, and processing conditions with a stated objective of achieving a minimum 5-log Salmonella inactivation in a raw chicken pet food product.
Embracing Agricultural Coexistence: Organic, Conventional, and Biotechnology

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S402ABC

Today’s consumer seeks greater transparency to all aspects of the food they purchase, including how it is grown or raised. This session will address the similarities between organic, conventional, and biotech food production, and dispel myths between the various agriculture methods. Technologies along the continuum of gene modification will be discussed, including CRISPR gene editing, methodologies used in the Artic Apple, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene transfer. Real life examples from the family farm will include how the synergies of different farming systems work together toward true sustainability and how farming in sensitive watersheds has more to do with which tools in the toolbox are utilized over which farming system is employed. Attendees will be challenged to ensure their decision-making, policy making, and communications align with science and fact-based information while meeting consumer demand for greater transparency to food production methodology. Too often we believe the answer is one way or another, but multiple methods of agriculture can co-exist in today's dynamic and global food supply to provide choice to consumers.
A National FSMA Training, Outreach, and Implementation Strategy for the Produce Industry, Part I

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S501ABCD

Recognizing that one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to training, USDA NIFA and FDA CFSAN collaboratively established the National Food Safety Training, Education, Extension, Outreach, and Technical Assistance Program, as mandated in Section 209 of FSMA in 2015. As mandated in FSMA, this competitive grant program provides food safety training, education, extension, outreach, and technical assistance to owners and operators of farms, small food processors, and small fruit and vegetable merchant wholesalers. Grants issued through this program provide funding for a National Coordination Center (NCC) and four Regional Centers (RCs), to extend food safety education, training, and technical assistance to specific audiences.

To provide a variety of training formats shaped by product, region, size and other factors, USDA NIFA and FDA CFSAN added to the training infrastructure in 2016. USDA NIFA established the Food Safety Outreach competitive grant program (FSOP). The program has created 50 FSOP awards; 12 Multistate Education and Training Projects that support collaborations among states not necessarily located within the same regions, but having common food safety concerns, or addressing common commodities; 22 Community Outreach Projects that support the growth and expansion of already existing food safety education and outreach programs currently offered in local communities; and 16 Pilot Projects that support the development of potentially high-risk and high-impact food safety education and outreach programs in local communities.

Simultaneously, FDA awarded the Local Food Producer Outreach, Education, and Training to Enhance Food Safety and FSMA Compliance cooperative agreement to the National Farmers Union Foundation. The Native American Tribes Outreach, Education, and Training to Enhance Food Safety and FSMA Compliance cooperative agreement was awarded to the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville to support the development of training curricula and delivery, in addition to education and outreach, among local foods producers and tribes, respectively.

This work builds upon an existing foundation created by the partnerships in the USDA and FDA FSMA Alliances, the Produce Safety Alliance, the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance, and the Sprout Safety Alliance which were established in 2010-2012. The FSMA Collaborative Forum, which first convened in April 2017, has provided a venue for collaboration among the training providers, including JIFSAN and NASDA.

These efforts have strategically focused on the delivery of customized training to target audiences to match the diversity of the food producers. This symposium will share the current program priority and RFA solicitation for FSOP potential applicants, work of the national produce safety training landscape, and the possibilities underway to leverage the momentum as a national best practice.
Educating the Future Food Scientists Capable of Facing Evolving Regulatory and Technological Challenges in the Global Food Industry

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S501ABCD

Over the last 25 years, the food industry faced a great deal of change in food science and technology, culture, policy, and politics and has been truly “global” in its scope and impact. Also, the emergence of new foodborne hazards, along with consumer habits, preferences, and demand for convenience, nutrition, and safety of food and ingredients have resulted in increased need for understanding and navigating changing the regulatory landscape by food industry professionals. While the academic institutions have kept pace with technical training in food science and technology, the industry is experiencing a dire shortage of prospective employees: we need food scientists, technologists, and even production workers who can function adequately in changing the regulatory and technological climate. This symposium is designed to examine the current academic preparation for food science and technology graduates and discuss associated challenges and opportunities for the food industry. This symposium is sponsored by Phi Tau Sigma, the honor society of food science and technology.
Formulating With Dairy and Non-Dairy Proteins

When: Monday, 01/01/0001 through Monday, 01/01/0001, 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Where:

According to Mintel, expansion of product offerings that emphasize plants as key ingredients is among the top six global food and drink trends for 2017. Food scientists now have a host of dairy and non-dairy ingredients to select for formulation of new products. Product development requires an understanding of consumer perception, opportunities, and challenges with each of the ingredients. This seminar will include a representative from Mintel to cover data on dairy and non-dairy product launches, consumer perception of non-dairy, and opportunities within the category. A representative from a dairy ingredient supplier will provide information on the types of dairy proteins, applications, methods for assessing functionality, and opportunities for innovation. Finally, a representative from a large food company will share an overview of the challenges in formulating with plant proteins in a variety of products and how ingredient manufacturers can work with food companies to support innovation.
Novel Application of Nanotechnology for Control of Pathogenic Viruses and Bacteria: An Innovative Approach to Food Safety

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S401D

Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize global agricultural and food systems in numerous ways, and can provide promising insights into potential applications for pathogenic control in food as well as disease treatment in food-producing animals and agricultural plants.

The prevalence of diverse, potentially harmful contaminants in food requires our continual attention. Foodborne diseases are caused by ingesting bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses through contaminated food or water, or via person-to-person contact. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the United States each year. The economic impact of five major foodborne bacterial pathogens was estimated to be $6.9 billion in 2000. Due to ever increasing trends in food safety, food manufacturers should take sanitary/ hygienic processes into key consideration. Minimizing the attachment of spoilage and pathogenic organisms to the surface of food processing equipment is one of the major challenges in the fields of food science and biosafety.

The effectiveness of antibiotics has been challenged by the occurrence of dangerous infections that antibiotics can no longer treat, as pathogens are developing resistance to the drugs. There is thus a compelling need to develop mitigation strategies based on the nanotechnology for antimicrobial resistant microorganism in food animals. Modern day agriculture requires extensive application of pesticides and agricultural biocides for preventing and treating microbial origin diseases, vector-borne diseases and other seasonal diseases. Specifically, yield loss in food crop production would have a significant effect on both food availability and food prices thereby directly affecting the global hunger levels. However, wide use of these biocides in the past few decades has resulted in accumulation of copper residues at alarming levels in the soil and in surrounding ecosystem. Strong motivation exists on improving efficacy of current Cu bactericide/fungicide through nanoscale engineering.

The proposed session will help build a diverse community committed to advancing work in the area of nanotechnology for agriculture and food systems, leading to novel ideas and approaches to create a sustainable and safe future. In appreciation of the above multidisciplinary nature, a diverse range of invited speakers will present a comprehensive vision of critical and emerging nanotechnology research advances across the field of agricultural sciences including animals, crops, and food processing, including: (1) development of nanotechnology based self-sanitizing surfaces for the control of human norovirus; (2) nano-engineered surfaces for prevention of microbes and biofilm; (3) copper and zinc based nanoformulations for controlling citrus canker and bacterial spot of tomatoes; and (4) engineering and in vivo evaluation of chitosan-based nanoparticles as alternative antimicrobial agents in food producing animals.
Establishing the Safety of Cellulose Nanomaterials for Food Related Uses

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Nanocellulose research is a topic of increasing interest in multiple fields due to its unique physical properties derived from their nanoscale size such as the high viscosity. However, the use of nanocellulose in food applications has not been approved by regulatory agencies due to questions about its safety and health implications. This session will cover up-to-date information in processing and characteristics of nanomaterials, their behavior in the human GI tract, and the results of toxicity studies. The session will also discuss ongoing and future studies required for regulatory agencies to approve nanocellulose for use in food related applications.



*Our thanks to Naturex for their sponsorship of the Product Development & Ingredient Innovations track*
Sugar: Dietary Recommendations, Current Intakes, and the Future of Sweets

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

The World Health Organization (WHO) has taken a firm stance on “free sugars,” advocating a reduction in the intakes of free sugars to less than 10% of total energy (and preferably to less than 5% of total energy) to deal with the growing epidemic of overweightness and obesity worldwide. In this session, the basis for the WHO recommendations will be discussed, and targets and definitions for sugars that have been adopted in key countries globally will be reviewed. Using national diet and nutrition surveys, the current intakes of total and free sugars will be presented, and the foods that are contributing most to these intakes will be discussed. Finally, challenges in the reformulation of foods and beverages with added sugars will be presented, with some promising solutions presented.
Solving Formulation Challenges With Plant-Based Dairy Alternatives

When: Monday, 01/01/0001 through Monday, 01/01/0001, 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Where:

Alternative dairy products are seen as beneficial to consumers for a number of reasons including environmental impact, allergens, overall health, and vegetarian lifestyle choices. However, there are specific challenges and concerns that must be addressed in developing and formulating a nutritious and organoleptically acceptable alternative dairy product. Some of these concerns will be addressed in this symposium, including: (1) nutritional and regulatory concerns, (2) texture gaps and (3)fermentation/culturing challenges. Alternative dairy products encompass a wide range of food products that are derived from plant-based sources such as legume, nuts, grains, and seeds that have been developed to have similar taste, texture and appearance as dairy-based products. They come in forms ranging from milk-like beverages, cultured yogurts, frozen desserts or vegan cheese. Despite concerns from consumers towards dairy products, dairy products are powerful nutritional vehicles that contain important nutrients such as complete protein, calcium, and vitamins. Replacing dairy constitutes a challenge to develop a product that has a similar nutrient package as a real dairy product.

Nutritional aspects of formulating an alternative dairy product will be discussed by Dr. Christopher Marinangeli, Director of Nutrition, Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, Pulse Canada. He will discuss the nutritional attributes of plant-based diets, including, nutritional adequacy or risk of inadequacy, and chronic disease. The presentation will also discuss the regulatory challenges in North America, particularly with plant-based protein, which can affect the ability to communicate the nutritional attributes of plant-based protein to consumers. Another challenge involves product texture. Dairy components are highly functional ingredients as they contribute unique functionality such as gelling, viscosity, and mouthfeel in dairy products. Removing these ingredients will result in a product that is low in gel strength, lacks mouthfeel and may be powdery. Ingredient strategies to build back and optimize texture in alternative dairy products that has a similar texture to traditional dairy products will be shown by Hanna Clune, Senior Food Technologist at Ingredion. Finally, developing cultured alternative products represents a unique challenge from a fermentation perspective. Dr. Mirjana Curic-Bawden from Chr. Hansen will discuss culture requirements for developing a vegan dairy product and some of the challenges associated with it. This symposium will allow the audience to understand the challenges associated with developing vegan dairy products as well as strategies and tools for overcoming these challenges.
From Lab to Fork: The Emergence of Cellular Agriculture

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

“Cellular agriculture,” the ability to produce agricultural products, such as meat, eggs, and milk through the use of biotechnology and cell culture and without the use of animals per se, is being touted as the next big breakthrough for ensuring a sustainable, safe, and ethical food supply. Meats produced via cellular agriculture have been given various monikers such as “cultured meats,” “animal-free meats,” “clean meats,” and “lab-grown meats,” to name a few. As this field of research emerges, it is conceivable that these cultured products could become commercially available in the near future. What are some of the regulatory challenges that will be faced by companies wanting to bring these products to market?

The market introduction of products developed via cellular agriculture poses a myriad of questions from a regulatory perspective. For example, what level of regulatory oversight will be needed? How will it be ensured that these products are safe? Will these products have to be nutritionally equivalent to their conventionally-obtained counterparts? How will they be labelled? When genetically modified (GM) foods were first developed and brought to market, existing regulations had to be adapted and new regulations had to be promulgated and, in some jurisdictions, GM foods continue to be contentious. Similar developments are likely to be needed for the commercialization of products obtained via cellular agriculture.

This symposium will begin with an overview of cellular agriculture: what it is, and the methods and technologies used to develop cultured animal products. The stakeholders involved in advancing the research and development of cultured animal products will be shared, in addition to the challenges associated with the progress of research in this area. Whether the existing regulatory framework in the United States for bringing food products to market can be adapted to support the commercialization of cultured animal products will be discussed, in addition to foreseen regulatory challenges.



*Our thanks to Naturex for their sponsorship of the Product Development & Ingredient Innovations track*