content tagged as Symposium

31 - 40 Results out of 81
Improving Microbial Safety of Fresh Produce: Pilot Plant and Commercial Scaled Studies and Related Agricultural Economic Analysis

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

Fresh and fresh-cut produce has been linked to outbreaks resulting from bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens infection in the last 20 years. Since 2011, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) authorized the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue regulations for fresh produce processors that would require establishment of preventive controls for potential food safety hazards in their products. In addition, United Fresh Produce Association just published a guideline for fresh-cut produce processors to involve three options to prevent cross-contamination during produce washing process including: (1) apply a pathogen surrogate for the microbial hazard and verify that cross-contamination is prevented by the antimicrobial wash; (2) use of antimicrobial sensors and the demonstration that a critical antimicrobial level is maintained during worst-case scenario; and (3) validate the placement of the sensors in the processing equipment. The dynamics of processing conditions applied by various produce growers are more complex than laboratory conditions. Meanwhile, the new FSMA gives small farms and direct-market farms who sell produce locally the option of complying with state regulations; provide the US-FDA with the authority to exempt farms engaged in low or minimal risk processing from new regulatory requirements; reduce unnecessary paperwork and excess regulations required under the preventative control plan; and exempt farmers from extensive traceability and recordkeeping requirements. Therefore, it is crucial to ensure that both industry scale and locally grown fresh produce producers/growers are equipped with scientific pilot plant validated information, which are closer to real-life scenarios. Besides, the most recent USDA-NIFA RFA specifically identifies the development of economic incentives that lead to improved food safety including fresh produce safety as one of its key priorities. The agricultural economic cost-effectiveness analysis will provide direct and early identification of major economic factors that impact the adoption of the pathogen control strategies during fresh produce processing. This session will begin with an overview of key factors affecting bacteria survival and transfer during tomato and leafy green post-harvest washing processing in pilot plants. Following that, an industry scale in-plant validation study of antimicrobial application in various fresh produce processes and the application of pathogen surrogate will be discussed. In addition, a “three-step” washing process to control foodborne pathogens on fresh produce and storage bins in West Virginia local community will be presented. Finally, an analysis of economic feasibility of control strategies to improve microbial safety for fresh produce will conclude the session. The invited speakers include a food technologist, food microbiologist, food industry consultant, and agricultural economist, and represent expertise from the food industry, government research institutions, and academia.
Protein: Understanding Consumer Interest and Attitudes to Develop Impactful Messaging

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S405AB

Protein continues to experience a surge in popularity in the marketplace, representing significant opportunity for food processors developing new or extending current offerings to deliver protein to consumers throughout the day. But what do consumers really know about protein? Are they able to distinguish between sources, how protein supports health or even how much they should be consuming? Or is it simply a case of more is better? This symposium will explore current consumer understanding of these and other topics related to protein. Findings from a recent consumer study regarding what consumers know about protein and related benefits of specific sources. This talk will be followed by a presentation on current evidence for the role of dietary protein to support health-related outcomes recognized by consumers, as well as outcomes that are only just beginning to be well-understood. The evidence that exists for a variety of sources, including emerging, alternative proteins will be put in context with those sources with more longevity in the food supply. The final presentation will explore how this information can be put to use in labeling to engage or educate consumers who are seeking protein-containing products. The different channels available and messages most well-suited for each will be discussed.
Probiotics: Trends, Opportunities, and the Latest Quality-Management Technology

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

The 2016 global retail value of the probiotic market was estimated to be $39.9 billion; $4.3 billion was attributed to dietary supplements. With 38% growth expected between 2016 and 2021, this sector can drive incremental sales of many different food products formulated to contain probiotics. Hence, food product developers are increasingly paying attention. The most critical information for producers, formulators, and consumers is the number and identity of the organisms present, with the physiological state of those organisms recently starting to become of interest. Traditional enumeration adds many days and associated inventory costs to the probiotic product supply chain. Flow cytometry has recently migrated from the clinical laboratory into the probiotic space, where it is increasingly being used to address manufacturers’, formulators’, and consumers’ needs for rapid and accurate enumeration of probiotic organisms.

This symposium will explore trends in the rapidly growing probiotics marketplace and the impact of those trends on the food industry generally, along with the industry’s perception of testing needed to support this rapidly growing market. The technology of flow cytometry will be explained, with examples of how it can better address the needs of these food and food-related sectors than traditional microbiological methods. Finally, a case study on instrument and matrix validations will introduce the use of flow cytometry for enumeration of probiotics products and describe some of the technical challenges overcome in applying this technology to foods. The audience will leave with a clearer picture of opportunities for probiotic product development and a clearer picture of the latest technology available for managing probiotic quality.
Non-Targeted Methods and Application of Food and Dietary Supplement Adulteration Detection: Challenges and Future

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404D

The impact of fraud on the food industry is not just the huge economic loss, but also on public confidence in food producers and regulators, as well as the risk of serious public health consequences. Traditional targeted testing on potential adulterants or marker ingredients is widely used in Quality Assurance and Quality Control systems. However, criminals have successfully evaded the QA/QC systems by using new adulterants or adding market ingredients into the matrix. One of the newer tools to combat food fraud is non-targeted methods. Non-targeted methods focus on the overall characteristics of the ingredient itself instead of the adulterants. With the advances of techniques and data analysis, non-targeted methods have been gaining attention from academia and industry. Large food companies, testing laboratories, and instrument manufacturers are implementing their strategies on the non-targeted screening of food and botanical ingredients. However, the methodology is still not widely used for multiple reasons. There is insufficient solid information about the development, validation, and knowledge support of non-targeted methods. Additionally, there is a lack of standardization: the method may be in use, but with inconsistent development.
This symposium session will first introduce the advantages, challenges, and standardization of non-targeted methods for adulteration detection. Then the applications of non-targeted methods using novel techniques and chemometrics to detect and deter adulteration in different food and botanical matrices will be presented. Case studies will include highly susceptible ingredients including milk powders, cheese, olive, and botanical materials.
Dialing Plant Protein Functionality for Enhanced Utilization

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S403AB

Consumers interested in health continue to view plant proteins favorably. As a result, sales of plant-based foods have seen a sustained growth, 8.1 percent alone since the last year (Nielsen, 2017). However, formulating with plant proteins comes with its own unique set of challenges. As the protein concentration increases in a protein-fortified food, its interactions with its surrounding matrix dominate, e.g. protein-protein, protein-water, or protein-flavor interactions. Secondly, processing parameters chosen during protein extraction and its transformation into the finished product can also influence these interactions and impact taste, texture or stability of the finished food product. Within this context, an understanding of protein’s functionality becomes essential not only to formulate foods with superior sensory characteristics but also to enhance protein utilization in additional product categories. Against this backdrop, this symposium will focus on new fundamental insights that have advanced our understanding of plant protein functionality. Speakers will emphasize new learning in the area of protein-flavor interactions, protein-protein interactions in blends, processing for optimal protein functionality and discuss how the knowledge of functionality can be leveraged for superior application.
The Challenge of Meat Alternatives: Stepping Up to the Center of the Plate

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Meat alternatives, specifically foods developed to match the flavor, texture, appearance, and form of traditional muscle food products such as burgers and frankfurters, have been a tiny, albeit consistent, sector of the food industry for decades. Recently, however, the segment has seen growth, with 14% growth in product launches from 2012 through 2016 and 8.6% revenue growth in the last year alone. Previously, meat alternatives were regarded as appealing largely to vegetarians and vegans, which represent a small portion of the population with limited growth. The current consumer landscape, however, sees a large and growing number of individuals looking to actively reduce their meat consumption while not eliminating it entirely, due to concerns around the environmental impact of large scale animal agriculture and potential health effects of heavy consumption of animal products. In 2014, 69% of German consumers said they ate a meatless meal once a week or more followed by 53% of UK consumers and 38% of US consumers; these countries alone representing a combined addressable market of 200 million consumers. Philanthropists and capital investors alike have empowered startup companies to expand into the realm of ingredient and process technologies available to improve market offerings. Even traditional meat companies have seen the appeal of the sector, acquiring or investing in recognized brands to diversify and, potentially, insulate their share of the consumer protein market. Still, despite many years of effort, the task of recreating the sensory experience of muscle foods remains difficult due to their inherent complexity. This symposium will explore meat alternatives through multiple lenses: a marketing focus on the current consumer shape of the segment, a technical focus on the science of structure in meat and meat alternatives, and a practical focus drawing on the experiences of several key individuals within the meat alternative space.
Development of New Pet Food Ingredients: Understanding the Science and Regulations That Lead to Success

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S402AB

The opportunity for new ingredients intended to improve the well-being of both companion animals and livestock has been growing rapidly. Marketing advantages have been guiding research into these functional ingredients, however, there must be an understanding of the challenges that come with altering diets and meeting adequate nutritional requirements for the target animal. In addition, novel animal food additives can introduce new analytical challenges that must be overcome in order to ensure safety and consistency of the added ingredient. Finally, regulatory challenges that are unique to animal food need to be appreciated when developing the path forward for new ingredients. There are distinct differences between GRAS and food additives in the need for publicly available data, consensus of opinion on safety, historical and background use, and proprietary position that make choosing the right path critical for success. Equally important is the understanding that dietary supplements do not apply to animal feed and ingredients which are intended to affect structure/function of the body other than having a nutritional impact make the new product fall under the regulatory classification of “new animal drug.” These nutritional, analytical, and regulatory issues will be explored in depth to provide the attendee with a good understanding of the challenges in animal ingredient development.
Shedding Light on Food Safety, Quality, and Nutrition: Opportunities and Challenges With Light-Based Technologies

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

The CDC estimates that every year, there are 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the United States due to consumption of foods contaminated with pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to process foods to effectively inactivate these microorganisms to render food safe. Various preservation technologies have been developed and adopted successfully to eliminate or reduce microbial contamination of the food. However, conventional treatments are very highly energy intensive with high capital and operational costs. Most often these processes also result in deterioration of food quality. Therefore, there is a need for alternative processing methods that are simple, cost-effective, have high inactivation efficiencies and yield minimal quality changes. Emerging technologies such as UV light, pulsed light and LED light processing show great promise since they can inactivate the pathogenic microorganisms while preserving the quality of foods.

This session will focus on recent advances in the light-based technologies for microbial decontamination. There has been an increased interest in the applications of light-based technologies such as UV light, pulsed light and LED light for inactivating microorganisms. Typically, these technologies operate in the UV, visible and near-infrared light range. Studies have shown that these technologies can effectively inactivate myriad microorganisms. However, there are several challenges associated with these technologies. The identified speakers are experts in the light-based technologies. They will shed light on the applications and challenges of these technologies. Due to the increased interest in these technologies, a symposium on this topic is highly warranted.

This session is sponsored by Phi Tau Sigma, the honor society of food science and technology.
Eating Less Red Meat: The Evidence Behind the Recommendation

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S405AB

This session will explore the evidence underlying recommendations for restricting red meat intake. In particular, evidence regarding current vs. recommended intakes to achieve a healthy dietary pattern, red meat’s impact on health outcomes such as heart health and cancer, and if red meat is compatible with a sustainable diet will be discussed. Three dynamic speakers will approach the question of red meat intake from multiple vantage points. Specifically, the health implications of including red meats in a healthy diet will be discussed. Secondly, the role of red meats and cancer will be explained based on current evidence. Finally, the challenges of limiting livestock production as a means of improving environmental outcomes while maintaining healthful diets for a growing population will be discussed.
Whole Genome Sequencing

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 07:45 AM - 08:45 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S404D

Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is an emerging technology that allows scientists to map the genetic sequence of pathogens and other organisms with such precision that they can distinguish between different strains of a bacterium and even slight variations by geography within the same strain. WGS has proven to be a powerful tool for food manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The technology can be used to determine which illnesses are part of an outbreak and which are not; to determine which ingredient in a multi-ingredient food is responsible for an outbreak; to identify geographic regions from which a contaminated ingredient may have originated; to link illnesses to a processing facility; to link small numbers of illnesses that otherwise might not have been identified as common outbreak; and to identify unlikely routes of contamination. While rapid analysis of WGS data still remains somewhat of a challenge, and may in some situations represent a bottleneck, easy-to-use, high-throughput bioinformatics tools for bacterial WGS data have been developed and are rapidly being improved. The cost of gene sequencing equipment is also continuously declining. With its advantages and decreasing costs, WGS has been integrated into routine foodborne disease surveillance and may replace other technologies such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in the near future

This symposium was organized by the IFT Quality Assurance Division in collaboration with the IFT Food Microbiology Division.