Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

Food Processing & Packaging

1 - 10 Results out of 17
From Farm to Fork: A Systemic Approach to Reducing Post-Harvest Losses Throughout the Supply Chain

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

From the large amount of food that is harvested in our global food system, for human and animal use, an overwhelming portion of the harvest does not make it to the end of the supply chain. This results in losses for food producers, as well as overall reduction in the quality and quantity of food. This ongoing gap regarding the reduction of post-harvest losses and conservation of quality food fit for consumption needs to be overcome in order to better address challenges associated with global food security. Major obstacles are present in all stages of the supply chain. The current session aims to give examples of how analysis of whole supply chains can assist with loss reduction, as well as specific examples of how loss can be tackled on the farm and at the shelf for different product categories. With all supply chains, a multifaceted approach is often necessary to pinpoint and develop suitable post-harvest loss reduction solutions for significant steps in the chain. The speakers have been selected based on their involvement in and knowledge of particular supply chains or points in the supply chain. Each of the speakers will share their expertise on a particular supply chain or point in the supply chain, which will include a discussion of critical points that influence post-harvest loss and strategies to tackle these. The following will be presented in this session: (i) an introduction to post-harvest losses from farm to fork, (ii) short food supply chain analysis as a system approach, (iii) post-harvest grain sorting as an on-farm strategy, and (iv) packaging options for loss-reduction of fresh produce. To end the session, a panel discussion will be held to allow the speakers and audience an opportunity to deliberate pros and cons of specific strategies, as well as to identify further areas of interest.
Waste to Win: Food Industry R&D Projects Recovering Value From Waste Material

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273

Management of food waste is an emerging trend driven not only by the economics of food processing, but increasingly, consumer demands for a sustainable food supply and corporate and industry-wide commitments to make our global food system sustainable for generations to come. Success stories within this field can be described by ecosystems that satisfy business models with technologies that work. This symposium will describe marketplace forces for food waste mitigation, the ecosystems that are emerging, and share three new industrial R&D stories describing how successfully applying today’s technology can convert food-waste to a value-added product stream.
Advances in Pulsed Electric Field Processing Toward Future Sustainable, Healthy, and Safe Food Production

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285

The food and bio-based industry are urged to find novel solutions to ensure sustainable, healthy, and safe product manufacturing in the future. A non-thermal technique able to present such a solution is pulsed electric field (PEF) processing. PEF technology is of growing interest for the food and biotech industry, where it was first implemented for potato and juice production. A low energy requirement, continuous operability, and short processing times are major advantages in comparison to conventional processing techniques. Since the first reports of PEF impact on plant, animal, and microbial cells in the 1960s, numerous applications in food and bioprocessing have been investigated.

Nowadays PEF is readily applied in other disciplines, including medicine and wastewater treatment. By varying the pulse amplitude and pulse length, a broad range of effects are induced, such as electroporated cells, cell permeabilization, and microbial inactivation, as well as cell disintegration.

In addition to those biological effects, pulsed systems are employed to determine target velocity, accelerate electrons and positrons within particle accelerators, and generate high peak power for fusion research as well as laser generation. Next generation PEF applications within the bio-based industry are emerging by bridging the gap between non-food and food applications. Implementation of knowledge in the food and biotech industry opens the possibilities to challenge the limitations of current PEF applications.

Emerging pulsed electric field processes are combined processing approaches such as PEF and vacuum drying, the integration of PEF into whole biorefinery concepts and the utilization of nanosecond pulses to increase intracellular electro effects.

The application of nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in bioprocess engineering is of major interest as the energy input could be further reduced compared to conventional PEF processing. Microbial contamination control, increased cell proliferation, and targeted release of intracellular valuables are among the possible applications.
Current Issues and Innovations in Commercial Brewing

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 383-385

Global beer-manufacturing continues in transition as craft brews increase in popularity while large-volume producers merge and redefine themselves to changing consumer tastes. In 2017, craft beer sales rose approximately 5% in the U.S. while total beer consumption dropped 1.2%; craft beers’ share of the U.S. market is now approximately 12.7%, representing $26 billion in sales. Experimentation with novel results is part of the expectation in craft-brewing circles. Small breweries are more nimble, producing small volumes of product in changing flavor directions. The high-volume, popular brands are well-aware of the increasing popularity of craft beers with increased emphasis on flavor and uniqueness. Consequently, there is business pressure for even more consistent reproducibility of their own products in addition to an enhanced perception of flavor improvement or novelty. Today’s beer drinkers are far more demanding. This symposium will address three important areas related to beer quality and product development; those areas are: (1) beer flavors (current trends, development, and stability); (2) activities and use of exogenous enzymes in beer-making; and (3) development of strains of brewing yeasts for improvements in sensory quality and other desirable properties. Use of genetic engineering for strain improvements will be overviewed. Beer production as a technical topic is not well-represented at the IFT annual meeting; it is hoped this symposium will assist in drawing interest and participation of brewers to IFT annual meetings.
Future (Plant) Protein Processing

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262

The market for products with plant-derived proteins has exploded in recent years and is predicted by market analysts to continue to grow at 6-17% per year through 2024. Protein processors and ingredient suppliers are working to address rapidly growing demand by exploring new sources, optimizing yield of existing crops, and extracting proteins from side streams. In this session, we explore the technologies enabling protein source diversification. Each talk examines a new or emerging plant protein source. We explain the innovative processes underpinning the emergence of these sources, and explore the case for applying the process to other sources. Each talk highlights the benefits to functional protein performance and concludes with the implications for product innovation in plant-based foods.
 
To enable new protein sources, food industry processes need to be revisited or developed to take advantage of pulses, algae, and insects, among other foods. Our first speaker walks through state-of-the-art solutions to process them. Special attention is given to pulses, a low cost, nutrient-rich protein source which can be incorporated in various daily food items to improve the nutrition and sustainability of our diets. Challenges and opportunities in plant-based protein processing and market relevance will be discussed.
 
Our second speaker describes the concept of hybrid ingredients as a sustainable plant-based food raw material. Efficient use of food resources and avoiding food waste are getting more and more important. Isolation of components is not always reasonable due to energy intensive extraction processes, which may also cause unwanted modifications in component functionality, e.g. denaturation of proteins. Therefore, an agile processed sustainable food ingredient should preferably be a hybrid (e.g. protein-carbohydrate in the case of bran fractions and protein concentrates) that deliver multi-scale functionalities and avoid production of unwanted waste streams.
 
The poor solubility in water of many plant proteins poses a challenge to traditional processing. The research presented in our third talk demonstrates that this poor solubility in water can be turned into a benefit, applying a purely physical (i.e. not chemical) process to add functional value to cereal proteins. The result is a quasi-dissolved, sub-micron particle of protein. The particles show promising and versatile properties with respect to stabilization and encapsulation. In this way traditionally lower-added-value insoluble proteins, for example those from wheat or corn, can be applied in a variety of food applications.
 
Many of the functionality challenges that limit the application of novel plant proteins may be circumvented using 3D printing technologies. In our final presentation, the use of 3D printing technologies such as fused deposition modelling, powder bed printing and selective laser sintering will be explored as potential processes that can integrate novel proteins into food structures. The incorporation of novel plant proteins from chickpeas, soybeans, and fava beans into 3D printed food products will be highlighted. Functionalities that enable successful 3D printing will be identified and translated to conclusions about the potential of using 3D printing technologies for product development concepts. The utility of 3D printing technologies for offering flexible, personalized formulations using novel plant proteins will be described.
Validation of Nonthermal Processing Methods Used for Controlling Pathogens in Foods to Ensure Compliance With Regulatory Requirements

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268

Nonthermal processing methods have become popular due to the notable advantages over traditional food pasteurization methods. HPP validation is complex and poses a serious food safety risk if the correct processing parameters are not met. Validation protocols, as well an indicator to ensure foods receive the correct time-at-pressure cycle, will be discussed.

Best practices and challenges related to the validation and adoption of nonthermal technologies for microbial inactivation and regulatory compliance will be presented.
Decoupling Protein Production From Animal and Land Usage: Single Cell Proteins and Macroalgae Nutrient Opportunities

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277

To supply a growing world population (reaching 9.1 billion by 2050 according to the FAO) with proteins, we need innovative approaches. To feed the global population, agriculture produces an estimated 525 million tons/year of plant proteins as found in corn, rice, wheat or soybeans of which only 25% goes directly into human nutrition. 60% of these proteins are fed to animals before reaching our fork, losing the 3/4 of these proteins in the animal conversion. This production is both land and animal dependent and carries a heavy environmental burden. In order to mitigate the environmental impact while sustainably supplying proteins, the controlled cultivation and processing of emerging alternative protein sources such as single cells (e.g. microalgae, yeasts) and seaweeds need to be demonstrated as competitive and affordable solutions.
 
Microalgae are a possible solution to tackle these problems. They can be grown on non-arable land and fixate CO2, if grown photoautotrophically. However, the majority of microalgae based biorefinery concepts are currently not competitive compared to other established production systems. Prof. Mathys will show how abiotic sub-lethal stress induction via nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) treatment might be a viable process to increase the efficiency of microalgae protein production. The combination of nsPEF and µsPEF under certain operating conditions can also be applied to avoid culture crash due to the presence of biological pollutants or facilitate a gentle release of thermosensitive proteins.
 
The market situation around microalgae also needs to be considered. Three major trends driving the food industry are naturally sourced products, the need to combine health and nutrition claims for food ingredients and an increased preference for environment friendly nutrition sources. Fermentalg’s innovative, sustainable, and cost-effective microalgae production technology fits into the above trends, with a product pipeline addressing three market segments. They will introduce how they oriented their R&D toward mixotrophy to provide a natural pigment to replace chemical blue colorants, and a promising alternative source of functional and nutritional proteins.
 
Beyond microalgae, the concepts of cellular agriculture i.e. the production of agricultural products from cell cultures of bacteria, yeasts, fungi, animals, and plants, challenge the ways of conventional food production. The technologies have the potential to tackle some of the grand challenges in sustainable food production. In her presentation, Dr. Emilia Nordlund will describe the utilization of cultured plant cells as fresh food, use of microbial organisms for single cell protein and cutting edge technologies enabling feasible large-scale production of functional animal proteins in heterologous expression systems, by fermentation.
 
Finally, Dr. Balunkeswar Nayak will discuss seaweed protein opportunities. Macroalgae, in particular red and green species, are gaining interest as protein-rich foods (5-45%) for human consumption and sources of proteinaceous bio-functional peptide ingredients. In his presentation, emphasis will be on a case study with dulse (Palmaria palmata) an edible red seaweed, found predominantly in high-latitude coastal areas, contains substantial amount of proteins ranged from 8 to 35% mainly phycobiliproteins. The feasibility of the use of proteins from dulse for high value-added products will be discussed.
New Markets for Food Waste and By-Product Utilization

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

North America is the largest food waste generator compared to any other continent in the world. In the U.S., we spend over $218 billion per year for growing, processing, transporting, and disposing 40% of the food that is never eaten. At the same time 42 million Americans face food insecurity. Food waste is the second largest component going to landfills generating methane, a greenhouse gas with 21 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide, making landfills the third largest source of methane in the U.S. While some food waste is currently being used as animal feed, in ethanol production, or for energy generation, compostable organic matter continues to represent the largest category of waste in landfills. Three types of waste are generated in retail/processing (a) surplus and edible fresh produce (e.g. apples), (b) surplus edible food products, and (c) inedible food waste from processing. These can be repurposed into nutritious food products, used to recover high-value functional components, and biobased materials. If this is achieved, complete utilization of food waste is possible, resulting in zero organic waste. This symposium will address new opportunities and challenges for food waste and by-products utilization on the commercial scale. The speakers will be a mix of industry, who will be sharing their success stories in utilizing food waste/by-products on the industrial scale; and academia, who will present new technologies for recovery of bioactives from by-products, and economic implications of such processes.
Emerging Food Processing and Packaging Technologies: Current Status and Future Prospects

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 283-285

The future of food production and consumption will be influenced substantially by the implementation of innovative technologies in the food industry, enabling manufacturing of safe and high-quality foods and efficient distribution of the products throughout the supply chain while minimizing wastage and environmental impact. In this symposium, the current status and future applications of several novel food processing and packaging technologies will be presented. Further, the importance of continuing fundamental research in the development of the next generation of food processing and packaging technologies for industrial use will be discussed. The session will feature three distinguished lectures from the selected speakers identified by the IFT Food Engineering, Nonthermal Processing and Food Packaging Divisions. The presenters are internationally recognized experts in the fields of food process engineering and packaging.
 
The Food Engineering Division Lecturer, Dr. V.M. (Bala) Balasubramaniam, Professor at the Department of Food Science and Technology, The Ohio State University and an IFT Fellow will present the engineering aspects of high pressure-based processing technologies and will cover the latest advancements in the process development and industrial adaptation of these technologies. Dr. Balasubramaniam is well-recognized internationally for his long-time contribution to the field of food process engineering, and particularly for his innovative research on high pressure processing (HPP) and pressure-assisted thermal sterilization (PATS).
 
The Nonthermal Processing Division Lecturer, Dr. Petros Taoukis, Professor at the School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens will review novel applications of the HPP technology beyond nonthermal pasteurization, including structural modification of macromolecules and improvement of textural and bioactive properties in selected food products. Dr. Taoukis is well-known internationally for his research in the areas of nonthermal food processing, osmotic processing, predictive microbiology, and enzyme technology.
 
The Food Packaging Division Lecturer, Dr. Kit Yam, Professor at the Department of Food Science, Rutgers University will present the principles of emerging active and intelligent packaging technologies and discuss how these technologies can create value in the food supply chain. Dr. Yam is an internationally well-known expert in food packaging and is recognized for his research on developing innovative food packaging technologies to improve food safety and quality. He is the recipient of the prestigious Riester-Davis-Brody Award in 2019 for lifetime achievement in food packaging.
 
This session is co-sponsored by Phi Tau Sigma, The Honor Society of Food Science and Technology.
Recent Challenges and Advances in Migration From Packaging Materials Into Foods

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

Packaging has a complemental role in the safety and quality of foods. Different forms of packaging include flexible or rigid, multilayer structures, petroleum-based, or bio-derived materials, or the combination thereof. During the manufacturing of polymeric materials, chemical substances such as plasticizers, antioxidants, slip-agents, inks, and adhesives are utilized to provide functional, aesthetic, and processability features. Such constituents can migrate into the packaged foods as a function of the type of polymer and food, environmental conditions such as temperature and processing effects. In addition, pulp-, glass-, and ceramic-based packaging materials that are traditionally considered inert can include additives and coatings migrating into packaged foods. Since packaging materials are also exposed to varying storage, handling, and processing conditions along with the type of food products, it is important to quantify the migration from safety perspectives due to its direct relation with the public health. For example, Bisphenol A (BPA), widely utilized in polycarbonates and epoxy resins in packages and containers (e.g. tinned-cans) as coatings, was found to migrate into the foods with heat exposure and disrupt the endocrine system causing several health concerns, especially for children and infants. Other examples of such chemicals of concern include phthalate esters, alkylphenols (APs) and di(2-ethyl hexyl) adipate (DEHA), and fluorinated compounds. Even though regulations on migration from food contact materials are available globally, there are distinctions of allowable limits, type of materials, testing simulants, and quantification methods. Many new thermal and non-thermal processing techniques comprising in-package sterilization such as high-pressure processing (HPP) and microwave-assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) have been developed; migratory aspects of substances in such processes need to be addressed.  
 
This symposium will provide up-to-date information on migration associated with new multilayer structures, petroleum-based, and bio-based materials, process-storage-material interactions, and regulatory activities for food-contact materials. First, an overview will be provided of the retrospective and recent food packaging contaminants, global migration regulations, experimental, and modeling approaches. Second, the migration of substances induced by HPP and HPP at elevated temperatures will be discussed. Finally, mathematical and computer-aided models on the migration of substances from packaging materials to food products and their reliability in predicting migration will be covered. The overall objective of this symposium is to provide the audience with recent information from regulatory, processing, and predictive modeling perspectives of migration from food contact materials into food products.