content tagged as Food Processing

1 - 10 Results out of 18
High Pressure Processing of Meats: Validation and Pathogen Destruction as Influenced by Formulation and Processing

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

Understanding validation requirements is critical in effectively designing products that assure corporate and regulatory food safety objectives can be met. This session will focus on understanding validation requirements from the FDA perspective and then continue with examples of screening and validation experiments designed to explore the impact of product formulation and processing conditions on microbial kill and food safety in meat based products. A thorough understanding of product characteristics potentially impacting efficacy of high pressure processing is ultimately critical in providing a robust food safety program.

The symposium begins with a review of FDA regulatory expectations concerning the proper design and execution of HPP validation experiments, including identification of critical variables along with guidelines for monitoring and reporting, and end with a review of the key elements of a thorough validation report. The next session will focus on experiments designed to elucidate the impact of formulation and processing conditions on pathogen kill in raw ground meat pet food products. Recent research on the impact of additional hurdle technologies utilizing antimicrobials, natural essential oils and herbal extracts to synergistically enhance microbial kill in the high pressure processing of meats will be reviewed. The final session will review a series of validation experiments designed to explore the impact of formulation, ingredients, and processing conditions with a stated objective of achieving a minimum 5-log Salmonella inactivation in a raw chicken pet food product.
Innovations in Cost Reduction for the Cheese Industry

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427ABC

Milk production, prices, and imports have risen steadily to meet growing demand across regions like Asia, Africa, and Latin America; in the coming years it is expected that the global demand for dairy products will outpace the supply putting further pressure on the prices of dairy ingredients and the ability of manufacturers to formulate cost efficient and affordable products. Driven by the increasing number of fast food restaurants, food outlets, dining restaurants, and households across the globe it is expected that the global demand for cheese and cheese products will pass the $105 billion mark by 2019, up from $72 billion in 2012.

This growth represents challenges and opportunities for cheese manufacturers who need to address formulation cost, functionality, and processing efficiencies while maintaining the good eating experience in their cheese products. Furthermore, there is a trickle-down effect of prices on products derived as a result of cheese making such as whey protein isolates and concentrates. In this session, researchers and manufacturers will learn how to overcome these challenges by understanding the functionality of different ingredients, how different manufacturing practices/methodologies and equipment can impact efficiency and yield and how they can orchestrate all three to achieve cost reduction or yield improvement. Scientists and engineers from Agropur, Ingredion Incorporated, and GEA will present on the market trends, industry challenges, the latest technologies and ingredients, and how they can be used and incorporated in the present cheese making processes to address costs while maintaining functionality and eating experience. Participants will gain a greater understanding of both existing and new ingredients, technologies, and additives that would enable them reduce costs, improve yield, and increase profitability in a highly commoditized business.
Improving Microbial Safety of Fresh Produce: Pilot Plant and Commercial Scaled Studies and Related Agricultural Economic Analysis

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

Fresh and fresh-cut produce has been linked to outbreaks resulting from bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens infection in the last 20 years. Since 2011, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) authorized the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue regulations for fresh produce processors that would require establishment of preventive controls for potential food safety hazards in their products. In addition, United Fresh Produce Association just published a guideline for fresh-cut produce processors to involve three options to prevent cross-contamination during produce washing process including: (1) apply a pathogen surrogate for the microbial hazard and verify that cross-contamination is prevented by the antimicrobial wash; (2) use of antimicrobial sensors and the demonstration that a critical antimicrobial level is maintained during worst-case scenario; and (3) validate the placement of the sensors in the processing equipment. The dynamics of processing conditions applied by various produce growers are more complex than laboratory conditions. Meanwhile, the new FSMA gives small farms and direct-market farms who sell produce locally the option of complying with state regulations; provide the US-FDA with the authority to exempt farms engaged in low or minimal risk processing from new regulatory requirements; reduce unnecessary paperwork and excess regulations required under the preventative control plan; and exempt farmers from extensive traceability and recordkeeping requirements. Therefore, it is crucial to ensure that both industry scale and locally grown fresh produce producers/growers are equipped with scientific pilot plant validated information, which are closer to real-life scenarios. Besides, the most recent USDA-NIFA RFA specifically identifies the development of economic incentives that lead to improved food safety including fresh produce safety as one of its key priorities. The agricultural economic cost-effectiveness analysis will provide direct and early identification of major economic factors that impact the adoption of the pathogen control strategies during fresh produce processing. This session will begin with an overview of key factors affecting bacteria survival and transfer during tomato and leafy green post-harvest washing processing in pilot plants. Following that, an industry scale in-plant validation study of antimicrobial application in various fresh produce processes and the application of pathogen surrogate will be discussed. In addition, a “three-step” washing process to control foodborne pathogens on fresh produce and storage bins in West Virginia local community will be presented. Finally, an analysis of economic feasibility of control strategies to improve microbial safety for fresh produce will conclude the session. The invited speakers include a food technologist, food microbiologist, food industry consultant, and agricultural economist, and represent expertise from the food industry, government research institutions, and academia.
The Challenge of Meat Alternatives: Stepping Up to the Center of the Plate

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Meat alternatives, specifically foods developed to match the flavor, texture, appearance, and form of traditional muscle food products such as burgers and frankfurters, have been a tiny, albeit consistent, sector of the food industry for decades. Recently, however, the segment has seen growth, with 14% growth in product launches from 2012 through 2016 and 8.6% revenue growth in the last year alone. Previously, meat alternatives were regarded as appealing largely to vegetarians and vegans, which represent a small portion of the population with limited growth. The current consumer landscape, however, sees a large and growing number of individuals looking to actively reduce their meat consumption while not eliminating it entirely, due to concerns around the environmental impact of large scale animal agriculture and potential health effects of heavy consumption of animal products. In 2014, 69% of German consumers said they ate a meatless meal once a week or more followed by 53% of UK consumers and 38% of US consumers; these countries alone representing a combined addressable market of 200 million consumers. Philanthropists and capital investors alike have empowered startup companies to expand into the realm of ingredient and process technologies available to improve market offerings. Even traditional meat companies have seen the appeal of the sector, acquiring or investing in recognized brands to diversify and, potentially, insulate their share of the consumer protein market. Still, despite many years of effort, the task of recreating the sensory experience of muscle foods remains difficult due to their inherent complexity. This symposium will explore meat alternatives through multiple lenses: a marketing focus on the current consumer shape of the segment, a technical focus on the science of structure in meat and meat alternatives, and a practical focus drawing on the experiences of several key individuals within the meat alternative space.
High Hydrostatic Pressure: A Non-Thermal Technology to Increase Safety and Valorization of Traditional Raw-Like Foods

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S401D

One of the most promising non-thermal food processing technique is high hydrostatic pressure (HP), which can be an alternative to traditional thermal methods being a possible method to apply in raw ingredients/unprocessed traditional food products with peculiar characteristics that can be affected by thermal processing. For this purpose, pressure levels in the range of 400-600 MPa are used. HP is capable of producing microbiologically safe products with minimal changes on food characteristics, and so with clear advantages over thermal processing. Recently, HP has been also applied for extraction (HPE) of bioactive compounds from several matrices and has been recognized as an environmentally-friendly technology by the Food and Drug Administration, ensuring that bioactive compound denaturation is avoided, facilitating the extraction of such components, particularly the thermo-labile ones. The effects of HP have been largely studied in the last decades, being already successfully, and predominantly, applied in the processes of “cold” pasteurization for gentle food preservation and commercialization. Other HP applications in food and biotechnology industries are related to the inactivation of enzymes, modification of proteins and food physicochemical properties. Moreover, HP is an environmentally friendly food processing methodology, since it only involves energy expenditure during compression and decompression phases; and once-recirculated water is the usual pressure transmission medium (without effluents production).

This session aims to unveil the very recent evolution of knowledge related to HP effects on different applications in order to valorize traditional raw or containing raw ingredients food products from different world locations (Portugal, Spain, and Australia), and it will rely on the presentation of research concerning the different possible applications of HP. For example, raw fish (from Australia), dairy products (such as Serra da Estrela cheese from Portugal) and meat products (such as steak tartar, fermented sausages, and dry-cured ham from Spain), are highly appreciated by the consumers due to their unique sensory characteristics. Nevertheless, their commercialization can be made difficult by the presence of several different microorganisms or the modification of its organoleptic characteristics. Also, stinging nettle bioactive compounds are usually extracted using conventional or supercritical fluid extraction, being highly degraded by high temperature, and HP can be a beneficial and useful tool to overcome all these problems. Recently obtained results that are still unpublished will be presented, with the objective of discuss questions such as the caused effects, advantages and benefits of using HP as a processing or extraction technique for valorization of traditional products. The session will address several important questions such as: Which pressure levels can be used to obtain maximum extraction yields, and/or inhibit microbial growth? What happens for longer storage times? Which are the effects of HP on the extracts biological activities?
The Future of Food Packaging

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

The future of food packaging concerns the consumer packaged food industry as well as business-to-business commerce in the case of food ingredients, as well as shipments of foods in intermediate states of processing for consumers. The future of food packaging relates to how packaging technology will be applied to extend the shelf life of food and decrease food waste while being competitive and meeting business-to-business as well as business-to-consumer needs. Future food packaging must be meet technical needs of a changing food supply, consumers’ buying patterns, and changes in complex supply and value chains. This session will not review past technologies in place; but, instead address emerging, future/pending food packaging technologies related to: sustainable packaging to align with the circular economy, meeting the needed of altering venues such as e-commerce, intelligent packaging to benefit the value chain, active packaging, and package design.

This topic is relevant to food industry professionals looking for innovations, development pipeline context, and competitive advantages, as well as researchers searching for alignment of their research to new packaging technologies. This session is co-sponsored by the Food Science and Technology Honorary Society Phi Tau Sigma.
Advances and Implementation in Ultraviolet Light Technology in Beverage, Dairy, and Grain Applications

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

Ultraviolet (UV) light has been used for decades for disinfecting water, and is broadly applied in Europe and North America. But until recently it has not been adopted for opaque fluids such as liquid foods and beverages. Recently, successful application in juice treatment has demonstrated the feasibility of UV for treating these fluids, and UV technology has started to emerge as a promising non-thermal preservation processes for other beverages. As a non-thermal, non-chemical disinfection technology, UV is anticipated to have minimal effects on product quality, flavor, and nutritive content. UV treatment is effective against food and water borne pathogens, spoilage microflora, spores, and can control pathogen levels to comply with regulatory requirements. The challenge remains that the range of optical and other properties of beverages is extremely broad. Also, each disinfection process may have different microbiological targets, meaning that each UV process has to be developed individually using specific system designs. In each application, three factors must be assessed: the treatment level required for the necessary reduction in target pathogen levels; the impact on product quality; and the regulatory requirements.

UV treatment may also be applied to destroy pathogens and chemical contaminants on solid surfaces, and UV is often used in laboratories to inactivate pathogens in fume hoods. Recently UV has been considered for treating surface toxins on grains, but in this application there are significant challenges in ensuring uniform treatment of an opaque, irregular object. In spite of this, recent research has shown promising results in this application, achieving significant reductions in mycotoxins on the surface of grain. Ultraviolet (UVC) light at 253.7 nm has shown promise as a non-ionizing postharvest strategy for the reduction of fungal and mycotoxin loads on both artificial and grain surfaces. Since the challenges of implementing UV are both theoretical and practical, this symposium has been designed as a collaboration between academic, government research, and UV industry experts. This symposium will briefly introduce the fundamental principles of UVC light germicidal effects and present approaches for evaluation of product and process parameters in applications of this technology for liquid foods and solid surfaces.

The first focused presentation will address the commercialization of UVC light application for non-thermal pasteurization of water in the dairy industry and requirements for regulatory compliance with the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance that governs the production of Class A dairy products. The second presentation will discuss UVC disinfection for beverages with low UV transmittance, focusing on juices. The effect of fluid optical properties on achieving required log reduction of food-borne pathogens will be discussed, and inactivation of relevant pathogens will be demonstrated. The third presentation will discuss the application of UV treatment for grain, in order to destroy mycotoxins on the food surface. The presenter will discuss results of a feasibility study of UVC light application to reduce fungal growth and mycotoxin loads on the surface of stored corn and wheat, and detail the challenges of UV treatment of UV treatment of irregular shapes.
Low Energy Electron Beams: Effective and Environmentally Friendly Surface Decontamination for Food and Packaging

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 07:45 AM - 08:45 AM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

Low-energy electron beam (LEEB) technology is a promising non-thermal food processing technology for microbial decontamination. This technology treats the target material with low energy electrons (≤300 keV), which provides an efficient surface decontamination with reduced energy consumption. Compared to other decontamination technologies, LEEB has several advantages. First, the technology is easy to operate, as it does not involve any chemicals, produce no wastewater, and does not contain radioactive material. Second, it is controllable and flexible as the lamps that provides the electrons can be turned off. Third, it is easy to be implemented in the existing processing line as it does not need heavy shielding due to the low penetration depth. Fourth, since the low-energy electrons interaction stays only on surface, the internal part of the target material remains unaltered. Therefore, the technology has minimal or no impact on quality. Moreover, due to its low energy input, LEEB produces more secondary electrons compared to high-energy electron beam and these secondary electrons can shadowlessly treat complex surfaces with high inactivation efficiency. In 2012, LEEB was introduced into the food industry as a sterilization method for packaging material. Nowadays, scientists and industry are actively looking for wider application fields of LEEB for decontamination of dry foods such as spices, seeds, etc.

In this session, two main aspects of LEEB will be discussed. First, the general knowledge and current development, such as how it works, how efficient the decontamination is, the influencing factors of its effectiveness, etc. Second, the advantages of LEEB compared to other microbial decontamination methods, and the possible implementation and application, including both the technical and legislative aspects.
Emerging Drying Technologies for Efficient Manufacture of Dried Ingredients for 3D Food Printing Application

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S404A

The proposed symposium is the continuation of a very well received symposium held at the IFT Meeting and Food Expo 2017 in Las Vegas, which attracted a significant number of participants. This symposium will further identify, describe and discuss emerging drying technology platforms suitable for efficient manufacture of high quality dried powders as ingredient for development of new food products with the application of 3D printing technology. Depending on 3D printing techniques (powder-based or liquid-based), the powders can be used as a suitable ingredient in its current form or hydrated into a slurry/paste in combination with other ingredients to prepare for a printable ink. The focus is on the development and application of cost-effective emerging drying technologies and their effect on the characteristics of the final product or during usage. These include but are not limited to: drying processes and their influence on product behavior and performance, the effect of emerging drying methods on the microstructure development of food products, ultrasound assisted low temperature drying of food materials for 3D printing applications, and extrusion porosity technology (EPT) drying process for manufacture of porous dried powders. These technologies and their influence on product characteristics will be discussed by internationally renowned experts from research organizations, academia and industry, focusing on process design, optimization and modeling, energy efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of the process, and impact on product quality attributes. The symposium is being organized by Dr Henry Sabarez (CSIRO); and Dr Pablo Juliano (CSIRO).
Fried Foods in Developing Countries: Consumption, Enrichment, and Optimization for Fat Reduction

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

In spite of the recent shift towards baking in place of frying, consumption of traditional fried foods is still prevalent in under-developed and developing countries. This session will explore the current status of various fried foods with focus on latest research data on production practices, consumer insights, optimization of production process for fat reduction, and fiber enrichment of fried foods. There are several factors (such as product formulation and process conditions) to consider in developing optimum nutrient-rich fried foods. A combination effect of these factors can be analyzed and interpreted through optimization. Utilization of fibers and other natural food additives with immense health benefits is possible without compromise of taste and functionality.