Feed your future
June 2-5, 2019 | New Orleans, LA

Public Policy

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1 - 10 Results out of 10
New Cannabis Frontiers in Public Health, Medical Science, and Food Safety

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 275-277

After a thirty-five-year War on Drugs, cannabis marijuana (Cannabis sativa) is legalized for personal or recreational use in 30 states and the District of Columbia (State Marijuana Laws). Marijuana, known on the street by more than 200 names, is a schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act (1970), which is enforced by the Drug Enforcement Administration. It should be noted that two cannabis containing drugs have been approved by the FDA and that other components of marijuana may show promise for treating medical conditions including chronic pain, muscle spasms, seizure disorders, and nausea from cancer chemotherapy. However, a food containing marijuana is considered adulterated as defined under U.S. food regulations (21 CFR 342).
 
Despite these regulatory dynamics, food products that contain marijuana with its vast array of psychoactive and non-psychoactive substances represent approximately 10 percent of the total U.S. cannabis market, which is nearly $5 billion and escalating daily. In addition, many analytical challenges remain in order to accurately assess the content of food products that contain THC and related cannabinoids. Recent reports indicate many cannabis-containing food products are out of compliance in many aspects when applied to the normal food supply. Yet, a recent GRAS affirmation of CBD may represent the regulatory and safety beginning of future applications in foods and dietary supplements.
 
The pharmacokinetics of the various cannabinoids, such as THC, and the associated terpenes, differ based on route of administration, such as inhalation or oral ingestion. For example, inhalation of THC may produce psychotropic effects within seconds to a few minutes, whereas those effects are typically delayed 60-90 minutes post ingestion and in addition, may be amplified following oral consumption. Most importantly, cannabis yields over 770 chemical compounds, many of which are less than well-characterized, and for which no safety data are available. Furthermore, only limited toxicological evaluations have been conducted via oral administration.
 
Yet, these kinds of food products are readily available but without traditional safety assessment, clinical substantiation, or regulatory compliance. There is a desperate need to better understand how exposure via various routes of administration, including oral through marijuana edibles and especially during the developmental teen years, influences brain development and brain injury. The legalization of marijuana may prove to be of significant political and social benefit, but the medical impact of readily available and potent edible forms of this plant must be better understood and approached with utmost care and caution.
Nutraceutical and Functional Food Regulations in the United States, Europe, and the Asian Sub-Continents

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 271-273

Over the last three years there has been significant change in the nutraceuticals and functional foods regulations in the United States and around the world. On the other hand, a large number of additional population around the world started believing in the efficacy and functions of nutraceuticals and functional foods backed by scientific research studies. Additionally, a number of structurally and functionally active novel nutraceuticals and several new functional beverages have been introduced into the marketplace around the world. Furthermore, Japan and USA have undergone a major strategic change in the nutraceutical regulation since late 2015, so this symposium will create an awareness in the IFT delegates attending this symposium. 

On an average, there has been a 35-60% change in the worldwide regulations in nutraceuticals and functional foods since 2008. In addition, the common public is gaining confidence in the quality products backed by sophisticated quality control of nutraceuticals and functional foods, a broad spectrum of safety studies and GRAS, peer-reviewed publications, and cutting-edge human clinical studies. NSF approval has become a key quality mark in nutraceuticals and functional foods. The objective of this second edition is to capture all the updates and new contemporary topics and bring it to nutraceutical and functional food institutions and companies, regulatory authorities, and to consumers.

On the other hand, there is another discrete category known as “medical foods,” which has been overlooked by many in the food industry. This symposium will focus on a lecture on medical foods. Furthermore, kosher and halal certification, gluten free foods, and GMO foods are the subject of increasing interest in the USA. A detailed lecture will be provided by an eminent professor from Cornell University, Department of Food Science, New York.
The Labeling of Bioengineered (BE) Foods: Consumer Perception and Industry Impact

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262

Bioengineered (BE) foods, previously referred to as genetically modified (GM) foods, are defined by the world health organization (WHO) as “organisms…in which the genetic material (DNA) has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally by mating and/or natural recombination” (WHO, 2014). The concept is not new; genetic modification of crops and foods has been occurring for centuries, (e.g., breeding programs to introduce desired traits). Although the American Medical Association, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the WHO have all endorsed concepts that BE foods are “safe” for consumption, a large portion of consumers do not believe this to be true, even condemning such foods as “Frankenfoods.” This symposium aims to present the current global regulations regarding BE food labeling, with a focus on the new U.S. Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS). It will highlight consumer perceptions of BE foods and the impact of BE food labeling on purchase intent. Finally, the necessary precautions industry must take to reduce the risk of litigation regarding claims of non-BE (non-GM foods) will be highlighted. This symposium is a must for anyone wanting to learn more about the new labeling regulations for BE foods and how these will impact the industry and consumers.
Update on European and US Regulatory Developments in Nutrition and Health

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 288-290

This session will give an update on nutrition and health aspects of regulatory developments in Europe and the United States.
Best Practices for Fraud Prevention in the Global Organic Supply Chain

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 386-387

The global organic market has been on a steady rise for more than two decades, and has never been bigger. It is now an almost $90 billion market, with the U.S. organic market alone accounting for close to $50 billion. Organic imports into the United States in 2017 totaled around $2.1 billion, up nearly 25 percent from the previous year. In the past several years, however, investigations have revealed imported products fraudulently labeled as organic and gaps in the complex organic supply chain. Fraud is one of the biggest threats to the organic market, and it cannot be tolerated in the organic system. In May 2017, the Organic Trade Association convened a task force of 48 member companies to develop a fraud prevention program designed specifically for the organic industry. As the first step toward this program, a comprehensive “best practices” guide was created by the task force to facilitate the industry-wide implementation of systems and measures to prevent fraud, both inside and outside of the United States. Following creation of the Guide, the trade association launched a pilot program. The pilot was an intensive-focused exercise in which participants “test drove” in their specific businesses the fraud prevention strategies described in the guide. This session will provide an overview of the finalized best practices guide for fraud prevention and the program organic companies may voluntarily enroll in. You will hear first-hand case studies from pilot project participants, learn about the vulnerabilities that pose the most risk of fraud, and discover an effective mitigation system for improving internal programs to achieve organic integrity throughout your associated supply chains. Participants will also learn what to do when you suspect or detect fraud, and how to file an actionable complaint to USDA’s National Organic Program.

 
Healthy Oils at the Center of New Science, New Guidelines, and Personalized Nutrition

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 260-262

A major shift is occurring as consumers are demanding more personalized options for what they eat. They want validated information on how these foods can benefit their health. Researchers and public policy makers are now upping the evidence standards for setting 2020 dietary guidance and the development of new food products that claim health benefits.
 
This session will show how new science on specific fatty acids, examined in the context of an individual’s unique genetic and gut signatures, can produce different metabolic consequences. A rapidly growing understanding of epigenetics and of the human microbiome is providing researchers a valuable context to determine why the same food may have different effects in different individuals. The research on fats and oils is out in front of many other areas and Peter Jones, Ph.D, the Canada Research Chair in Functional Foods and Nutrition, will provide many insights on where the science of personalized nutrition is going.
 
The new 2020–2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans has a restructured process to better focus the abundance of research the science advisory council must review. There will be a review of topics and scientific questions across the life stages as well as from a dietary pattern perspective.  Barbara Schneeman, Ph.D, not only served on the committee assigned to restructure this process, but is the former director of the Office of Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements at FDA. She will provide perspective on how the new process will use good science to strengthen the nation’s dietary recommendations.
 
Ultimately the industry must meet the growing challenges to produce tasty, diverse products that impart health benefits demanded by consumers. Seed and ingredient innovation plays a key role in making this happen in the world of oils. David Dzisiak, NA Commercial Leader for Grains and Oils at Corteva Agriscience, will share his insights on recent consumer data, as well as how innovation in the industry is meeting the practical challenges for developing a wide array of new, healthier products consumers will enjoy.
Recent Challenges and Advances in Migration From Packaging Materials Into Foods

When: Wednesday, 06/05/2019 through Wednesday, 06/05/2019, 08:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

Packaging has a complemental role in the safety and quality of foods. Different forms of packaging include flexible or rigid, multilayer structures, petroleum-based, or bio-derived materials, or the combination thereof. During the manufacturing of polymeric materials, chemical substances such as plasticizers, antioxidants, slip-agents, inks, and adhesives are utilized to provide functional, aesthetic, and processability features. Such constituents can migrate into the packaged foods as a function of the type of polymer and food, environmental conditions such as temperature and processing effects. In addition, pulp-, glass-, and ceramic-based packaging materials that are traditionally considered inert can include additives and coatings migrating into packaged foods. Since packaging materials are also exposed to varying storage, handling, and processing conditions along with the type of food products, it is important to quantify the migration from safety perspectives due to its direct relation with the public health. For example, Bisphenol A (BPA), widely utilized in polycarbonates and epoxy resins in packages and containers (e.g. tinned-cans) as coatings, was found to migrate into the foods with heat exposure and disrupt the endocrine system causing several health concerns, especially for children and infants. Other examples of such chemicals of concern include phthalate esters, alkylphenols (APs) and di(2-ethyl hexyl) adipate (DEHA), and fluorinated compounds. Even though regulations on migration from food contact materials are available globally, there are distinctions of allowable limits, type of materials, testing simulants, and quantification methods. Many new thermal and non-thermal processing techniques comprising in-package sterilization such as high-pressure processing (HPP) and microwave-assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) have been developed; migratory aspects of substances in such processes need to be addressed.  
 
This symposium will provide up-to-date information on migration associated with new multilayer structures, petroleum-based, and bio-based materials, process-storage-material interactions, and regulatory activities for food-contact materials. First, an overview will be provided of the retrospective and recent food packaging contaminants, global migration regulations, experimental, and modeling approaches. Second, the migration of substances induced by HPP and HPP at elevated temperatures will be discussed. Finally, mathematical and computer-aided models on the migration of substances from packaging materials to food products and their reliability in predicting migration will be covered. The overall objective of this symposium is to provide the audience with recent information from regulatory, processing, and predictive modeling perspectives of migration from food contact materials into food products.
Hazard Assessment and Standard Development for Colors from Natural Sources

When: Tuesday, 06/04/2019 through Tuesday, 06/04/2019, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 388-390

Food color additives from natural sources have become popular in the global market. Referred to as “natural” colors by consumers, they are sourced from plants, minerals, and animals. Unlike synthetic color additives, in the US “natural” colors are exempt from the FDA color certification process. However, safety evaluations of colors from natural sources indicate that they may be associated with toxins, may induce neurotoxicity, and may promote selective cytotoxicity (normal and neoplastic cells). Despite the exempt regulatory status for color additives from natural sources, the development and application of more robust safety assessments, including classic toxicology and a more rigorous application of physiological chemistry, is warranted. Moreover, current regulations for colors from natural sources lack the consistent definitions and internationally accepted quality control and product safety specifications that typically comprise a harmonized regulatory framework. The development of an increasing global supply chain for colors from natural sources raises safety and quality concerns, including adulteration, pesticide residues, solvent residues, heavy metals, and microbiological contaminants. Hazard analysis has indicated that safety risks for colors from natural sources are high. In addition, there is a lack of agreement on standard testing methods to ensure safety, quality, and purity of food color additives from natural sources. Hence, developing public standards including methods and specifications for colors from natural sources will provide a science-based approach for the needed quality and safety assurances. This symposium will first provide a review on global regulations for color additives from natural sources. Then safety evaluation and hazard assessment for colors from natural sources will be presented. Lastly Food Chemicals Codex (FCC) standards development will be introduced as a mitigation strategy for ensuring quality and purity of food colors from natural sources. Case studies will also be presented, including FCC standards development for carmine and carthamus yellow.
Safety Assessment: Confidence in Your Ingredients From Nature to Table

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 265-268

Consumers are re-evaluating the complete life cycle of both standard and new food ingredients and food products, from the production of the raw agricultural ingredients, through processing and final product packaging. Consumers are wanting more transparency in the process, as well as a reduction in preservatives, excipients and artificial ingredients. The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) is helping to streamline and document multiple aspects of food production, and is potentially increasing food processing transparency, including the potential incorporation of blockchain technology in food production. Meeting FSMA requirements entails a re-evaluation of analytical methodology as well as the overall determination of the safety of both the ingredients and the final product. The symposium focuses on safety assessments of (new) food ingredients, by-products of other food products/production, products/by-products of fermentation processes, necessary analytical methodology modifications, and the potential impact of FSMA on the production processes and use of new ingredients.
Natural Colors: Opportunities for Innovation

When: Monday, 06/03/2019 through Monday, 06/03/2019, 03:30 PM - 05:00 PM

Where: Ernest N. Morial Convention Center - 291-292

Color is often the first characteristic that influences the purchasing decision, especially for new products. Colored foods and beverages are often more appealing visually and directly impact the perception of quality and overall experience. With the recent trend of consumers looking for foods with “clean labels,” the market demand for “natural” colors is increasing. Several case studies of brands that have converted to natural colors have shown that many consumers are willing to pay more for a more natural product.
 
However, global regulatory agencies do not have a harmonized viewpoint as to the definition of "natural" color additives nor their approval and use requirements. Failure to be aware of the disparate regulatory requirements can lead to compliance and labeling challenges. Additionally, color manufacturers have been engaging in innovative research and product development to meet this market demand, resulting in new natural color opportunities as well as the identification of limitations, although many commonly stated challenges are misperceptions.
 
This panel session brings together food color experts to share their experiences and perspectives on the impact of regulations on natural color innovation.
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