content tagged as Public Policy

1 - 10 Results out of 15
Healthy Oils: The New Go-To Ingredient for Health and Function

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N426C

A paradigm shift is occurring as global dietary guidance and regulatory action moves to encouraging optimal amounts of “good fats” in the diets of consumers. Quickly accumulating nutrition research is driving this trend and innovation throughout the food chain is making the development of new oil ingredients possible. This session will examine the latest science driving the trends on healthy oils, review the biggest regulatory and policy changes coming on fats and oils in over two decades, and delve into the innovations that will allow product developers to create healthier, tasty, functional products.

Dr. Cyril Kendall, an internationally respected researcher at the University of Toronto who specializes in healthy diet patterns, will discuss how an ever-growing body of nutrition research is showing that poly and monounsaturated fats should not only be used to replace trans and saturated fats in the diet, but how they also confer independent health benefits. Since dietary fats and oils constitute about one third of our daily calories, this is a significant development for the very large, and growing, population afflicted with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Public policy groups and regulatory agencies are in the process of implementing the first major update in over two decades of package labels. Patricia Kearney, President of PMK Associates, Inc. and former Chief of Staff of USDA, will address how FDA and USDA will integrate efforts on back of pack nutrition labels and GMO labeling, discuss which foods might use the claim “healthy,” and how a new structure for establishing the next Dietary Guidelines for Americans could affect product development in the future. The demand for healthy, functional and tasty products is on the rise. Innovative technologies using advanced breeding techniques and customized blends of new generation oils create functional ingredients that can help companies meet this demand. Christopher Nowlan, who as a senior oil products manager at Dow DuPont, Inc., is a food chain expert on areas from seed development to end use products. He will talk about the use of new techniques used to develop GMO and non-GMO seeds, traceability, new oil blends, and customized ingredients.
Whistleblower Protections Under FSMA: Food Industry and Legal Perspectives

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

As the FDA focuses on the development and implementation of food safety rules under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is responsible for implementation and enforcement of FSMA’s Whistleblower Protection Provision (FSMA Section 402). The FSMA Whistleblower Protection Provision “prohibits entities engaged in manufacturing, processing, packing, transporting, distributing, receiving, holding, or importing food from retaliating against employees for engaging in certain protected activities, including reporting alleged violations of the FD&C.” The protected activities may include “providing information relating to any violation of the FD&C or any act that he or she reasonably believed to be a violation of the FD&C to: − the employer, − the Federal Government, or − the attorney general of a state, testifying, assisting, or participating in a proceeding concerning a violation of the FD&C; or objecting to or refusing to participate in any activity that he or she reasonably believed to be in violation of the FD&C.” In contrast to the significant outreach efforts expended on the food safety rules in FSMA, section 402 is neither well known nor understood, and many questions remain. For example, is a food testing laboratory a covered entity? If an employee objects to “re-dating” or selling “expired” food products, does that constitute a protected activity?

Many IFT members are “employees” of food “entities” and serve as representatives for their employers in decision-making processes. This symposium is designed to help all attendees understand the Ins and Outs of FSMA whistleblower protection.
Food Importing: Green Light Strategies for Compliance With Game Changing FSVP Requirements

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

In order to meet the new stringent demands under FSMA, FDA, and CBP have conducted more extensive evaluations foreign food shipments impacted by FSVP. FDA and CBP want to ensure that all compliance information from the FSVP Importer, DUNS numbers, and other FDA compliance information are accurately captured, and demonstrate that foreign food manufacturers are producing food with at least the same assurance of safety as is required of domestic manufacturers.

Understanding the nuanced requirements of FSMA documentation can be daunting. Problems can result in holding or refusing an imported product, creating a real challenge for importers. From language barriers to reliability of supplier documents, this session will cover some common issues importers are encountering and suggestions for assessing and improving systems so that production, transportation, and import operations runs smoothly. We will discuss FDA requests for written documents under Sec 1.512(b)(5)(ii)(C) and the various means of providing this documentation, along potential benefits and pitfalls in doing so. Finally, FDA expectations during an inspection will be reviewed so that a best practices approach can be implemented for a smooth process and positive findings.
Is It Time to Change the Paradigm for Food Toxicology? Nitrate as a Case Study

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - N427D

Nitrate is an anion produced naturally in the body, it occurs naturally in the environment, and it is also used as a fertilizer as well as a food additive, sometimes together with nitrite. Human exposure occurs readily, since it is part of a normal diet, primarily via consumption of vegetables (typically 60-80%), though nitrate is also found in fruits, dairy products, cured meats, fish, beers, water, and cereals. In recent years, significant human health benefits have been reported for nitrate, especially for cardiovascular effects such as blood pressure, platelets, endothelial function, mitochondrial efficiency, and exercise, as well as those health benefits that are typically associated with a diet high in vegetable content. Historically, going back over 70 years, however, there have been some reported health concerns related to nitrate exposure involving the occurrence of methemoglobinemia, an effect which is now understood to be limited to infants and which is confounded by other factors (e.g., gastroenteritis), as well as being associated with high-dose nitrate exposures in well water. While multiple nitrate toxicity values have been developed by several public health and regulatory agencies (USEPA, 1991; ATSDR, 2015), the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has also established an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI), but it is the only value unique to food consumption as a source of exposure. ADIs by definition are estimates of a food additive that can be ingested daily over a lifetime without appreciable health risk. The current JECFA ADI for nitrate is 0-3.7 mg/kg-day. However, those consumers around the world with high-vegetable intake diets, such as those on the “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” (DASH Diet), have nitrate intakes that greatly exceed the JEFCA ADI. Unfortunately, this ADI is based solely on effects seen in a chronic rat toxicology bioassay, which is in turn based on the current toxicology paradigm of using the results of animal toxicity studies to estimate possible human risk. This symposium will summarize the current science on dietary nitrate (and nitrite) as important precursors of nitric oxide (NO), which is an important cell-signaling molecule and potent vasodilator. It will also propose an alternative paradigm of reassessing the potential human health effects of nitrate, seeking to establish an evidence-based, health-protective ADI that takes into account the complexities surrounding nitrate, including effects such as the beneficial physiological role of nitrate and nitrite in maintaining adequate NO levels, the relevance of exposure scenarios associated with adverse effects, differential kinetics by age and species, and the health benefits of diets high in nitrate-rich vegetables and fruits.
The Codex Alimentarius Commission: A Harmonizing International Benchmark for Global Food Trade

When: Wednesday, 07/18/2018 through Wednesday, 07/18/2018, 01:15 PM - 02:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

Codex is an international food standards setting organization of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization (WHO), established to develop international food standards, codes of practice, and other guidelines to protect consumer health and ensure fair practices in international trade in food. Within the parameters of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the SPS Agreement (Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures), Codex texts are considered international benchmarks/reference points for national food measures and regulations, and are used as standards against which to evaluate the claims of parties in WTO trade disputes. IFT is actively involved in Codex, providing scientific and technical input at all levels of five Codex committees—the committees on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses, Food Hygiene, Food Additives, Contaminants in Foods, and Food Labeling. This session will illuminate for attendees the important role of Codex in international trade, and will inform them on the Codex process, and how outcomes of its deliberations affect world food commerce. In addition to this in-depth introduction to Codex, presenters will address the work of Codex committees in which IFT is involved. Attendees will also learn ways in which they may draw on their own expertise and specific insights to contribute to IFT’s input into Codex.
A National FSMA Training, Outreach, and Education Landscape for the Produce Industry, Part I

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S501ABCD

Recognizing that one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to training, USDA NIFA and FDA CFSAN collaboratively established the National Food Safety Training, Education, Extension, Outreach, and Technical Assistance Program, as mandated in Section 209 of FSMA in 2015. As mandated in FSMA, this competitive grant program provides food safety training, education, extension, outreach, and technical assistance to owners and operators of farms, small food processors, and small fruit and vegetable merchant wholesalers. Grants issued through this program provide funding for a National Coordination Center (NCC) and four Regional Centers (RCs), to extend food safety education, training, and technical assistance to specific audiences.

To provide a variety of training formats shaped by product, region, size and other factors, USDA NIFA and FDA CFSAN added to the training infrastructure in 2016. USDA NIFA established the Food Safety Outreach competitive grant program (FSOP). The program has created 50 FSOP awards; 12 Multistate Education and Training Projects that support collaborations among states not necessarily located within the same regions, but having common food safety concerns, or addressing common commodities; 22 Community Outreach Projects that support the growth and expansion of already existing food safety education and outreach programs currently offered in local communities; and 16 Pilot Projects that support the development of potentially high-risk and high-impact food safety education and outreach programs in local communities.

Simultaneously, FDA awarded the Local Food Producer Outreach, Education, and Training to Enhance Food Safety and FSMA Compliance cooperative agreement to the National Farmers Union Foundation. The Native American Tribes Outreach, Education, and Training to Enhance Food Safety and FSMA Compliance cooperative agreement was awarded to the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville to support the development of training curricula and delivery, in addition to education and outreach, among local foods producers and tribes, respectively.

This work builds upon an existing foundation created by the partnerships in the USDA and FDA FSMA Alliances, the Produce Safety Alliance, the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance, and the Sprout Safety Alliance which were established in 2010-2012. The FSMA Collaborative Forum, which first convened in April 2017, has provided a venue for collaboration among the training providers, including JIFSAN and NASDA.

These efforts have strategically focused on the delivery of customized training to target audiences to match the diversity of the food producers. This symposium will share the current program priority and RFA solicitation for FSOP potential applicants, work of the national produce safety training landscape, and the possibilities underway to leverage the momentum as a national best practice.
Sugar: Dietary Recommendations, Current Intakes, and the Future of Sweets

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

The World Health Organization (WHO) has taken a firm stance on “free sugars,” advocating a reduction in the intakes of free sugars to less than 10% of total energy (and preferably to less than 5% of total energy) to deal with the growing epidemic of overweightness and obesity worldwide. In this session, the basis for the WHO recommendations will be discussed, and targets and definitions for sugars that have been adopted in key countries globally will be reviewed. Using national diet and nutrition surveys, the current intakes of total and free sugars will be presented, and the foods that are contributing most to these intakes will be discussed. Finally, challenges in the reformulation of foods and beverages with added sugars will be presented, with some promising solutions presented.
Protein: Understanding Consumer Interest and Attitudes to Develop Impactful Messaging

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S405AB

Protein continues to experience a surge in popularity in the marketplace, representing significant opportunity for food processors developing new or extending current offerings to deliver protein to consumers throughout the day. But what do consumers really know about protein? Are they able to distinguish between sources, how protein supports health or even how much they should be consuming? Or is it simply a case of more is better? This symposium will explore current consumer understanding of these and other topics related to protein. Findings from a recent consumer study regarding what consumers know about protein and related benefits of specific sources. This talk will be followed by a presentation on current evidence for the role of dietary protein to support health-related outcomes recognized by consumers, as well as outcomes that are only just beginning to be well-understood. The evidence that exists for a variety of sources, including emerging, alternative proteins will be put in context with those sources with more longevity in the food supply. The final presentation will explore how this information can be put to use in labeling to engage or educate consumers who are seeking protein-containing products. The different channels available and messages most well-suited for each will be discussed.
Development of New Pet Food Ingredients: Understanding the Science and Regulations That Lead to Success

When: Tuesday, 07/17/2018 through Tuesday, 07/17/2018, 02:15 PM - 03:45 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S402AB

The opportunity for new ingredients intended to improve the well-being of both companion animals and livestock has been growing rapidly. Marketing advantages have been guiding research into these functional ingredients, however, there must be an understanding of the challenges that come with altering diets and meeting adequate nutritional requirements for the target animal. In addition, novel animal food additives can introduce new analytical challenges that must be overcome in order to ensure safety and consistency of the added ingredient. Finally, regulatory challenges that are unique to animal food need to be appreciated when developing the path forward for new ingredients. There are distinct differences between GRAS and food additives in the need for publicly available data, consensus of opinion on safety, historical and background use, and proprietary position that make choosing the right path critical for success. Equally important is the understanding that dietary supplements do not apply to animal feed and ingredients which are intended to affect structure/function of the body other than having a nutritional impact make the new product fall under the regulatory classification of “new animal drug.” These nutritional, analytical, and regulatory issues will be explored in depth to provide the attendee with a good understanding of the challenges in animal ingredient development.
Preventive Controls for Human Foods: Successes and Challenges for FDA and the Food Industry

When: Monday, 07/16/2018 through Monday, 07/16/2018, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Where: McCormick Place - S502AB

With FDA’s Preventive Controls for Human Foods (PCHF) under the Food Safety Modernization ACT (FSMA), the food industry has been working hard to meet expectations – reviewing and updating protocols, creating more thoroughly documented processes, and working with suppliers to ensure a robust safety standard throughout the supply chain. From hazard analysis, preventive controls, monitoring, corrective actions verification and validation activities, each area of the food industry, from the ingredient and packaging suppliers through the retailer is affected.

This session starts with a brief analysis of FDA’s boots-on-the-ground experience in enforcing the PCHF rule (Part 117), including FDA 483 findings, FDA field investigator focus and trends as well as a review of recent FDA Preventive Control industry guidance documents and instructions to its field investigative staff. This session will also share FDA Preventive Control investigations from the perspective of the food manufacturer via panelists from large US food processors. It will then explore the FDA enforcement direction versus the food processing industry understandings to identify gaps in perceptions and understandings from both perspectives and propose recommendations on hot to cover these gaps Case study examples will be used to provide insight into actual Form FDA 483 findings to learn more about industry weaknesses and how FDA conducts follow-up enforcement and which enforcement “tools” are being used. This will then identify which industry preparations are working, which will require tweaking to better meet FDA expectations. It will conclude with a discussion on the FDA enforcement of the Foreign Supplier regulation and its impact on foreign food manufacturers.

Food safety and PCHF is everyone’s business, from food manufacturers, shareholders, mainstream and social media to the public and their perception of how companies manage their business and brand. Don’t try to guess where to invest your food safety resources, attend this session to learn directly from both the FDA and food processing industry’s perspectives. Then utilize this information to make adjustments in your food safety program and reduce regulatory risk, all for the purpose of a safer food supply. The speakers will report on the implementation and impact of PCHF as well as provide new applicable and practical information on implementation. Specific industry examples will be given including perspectives from the ice cream ice cream industry.

This is a must-attend session for all industry and government food safety regulators as PCHF touches every food manufacturer in some way and collectively each level of the supply chain has responsibility for delivering on the safety of food in the US marketplace. Lack of compliance and missteps will have huge implications for business, industry, and the public.